Speedwell Projects Presents: PARALLAX | Deborah Klotz

Untitled (installation detail), 2020 Poured abaca handmade paper and spruce 26″x26″x6″

SPEEDWELL projects winter artist-in-resident, Deborah Klotz, will exhibit new works in the upcoming exhibition PARALLAX (object+-subject) (expand+-compress).

The exhibit will be on view from February 6, 2020 – March 7, 2020 in Portland. The opening reception will take place on Saturday, February 15th from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM. On Sunday, March 1st at 4 pm Deborah will be in conversation with artists Katarina Weslien and Jan Piribeck. Extended hours for First Friday Art Walk – Friday, February 7 and Friday, March 6.

Deborah Klotz is an object and image-maker who explores the process by responding to a sequence: object/response/action/repeat. Her work in the upcoming solo show is a visual and material dialogue with the practice and concept of “drawing”: inverting and torquing hierarchies of subject and surface, form and image, material and intent/expectation, object scale and visual /conceptual weight. Working with both physical objects, (cast paper drawings, large scale image transfers, magnetically charged skins of paper, and compressed sculptural shapes), as well as ephemeral states of shifting light, air currents, and wall/ floor/ object transitions, she invites traditional materials of paper, steel, and wood, to fuse with non-traditional techniques. The visual expanse we see as the landscape can be built by shifting how we see interior work. Attention to the ground, to close observation and material sensation is invited with copper floor formats and silkscreened “carpets” on concrete.

PARALLAX (object+-subject) (expand+-compress) features iron prints, compressed and expanded cast fiber structures, copper and steel woven lace surfaces, roots and wood wheels with veils of poured pulp, as well as an excerpt from a large scale installation of imaged objects which fused digital and analog texture, “Fungus on Spineboards” (last shown at the Decordova Museum at the seminal show “The Computer in the Studio” c1995.) Deborah’s new works respond to the more ancestral sculptural presence of a time-shifted yet persistent narrative of the Spineboards.

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