Author Archive for Anthony Anderson – Page 2

The Framemakers host Cozy Retreat Exhibition and Curates Gallery at The Last Unicorn

David Clinard

 

The Framemakers in Watervill host Cozy Retreat Exhibition from January 15 through March 13.

Artist collections on display include:
Mixed Media by Todd Devin Burns;
Photography by David Clinard;
Acrylics by Barbara Chase;
Jewelry by Kami Thorpe;
Prints & Earrings by Greta Joseph.
Also featuring the first public showing of “Mirsad and Cousin” by Larry Stanton.

 

Barbara Chase

Craft items such as Pottery and Art Cards are available
for purchase throughout the exhibit.

Also,

 

Ryan Kohler

 

We are excited to announce that we are partnering with The Last Unicorn Restaurant in the curation of their gallery. This exhibit includes the works of Ryan Kohler. His artwork will be displayed in both dining areas until March 13th.

UMaine Museum of Art announces Winter Exhibitions

 The University of Maine Museum of Art, located at 40 Harlow Street in downtown Bangor, opens three new exhibitions in January. UMMA is open Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am – 5 pm and brings modern and contemporary art to the region, presenting approximately 12 original exhibitions each year. UMMA’s winter shows open to the public on January 18 and runs through May 4, 2019. Admission to the Museum of Art is free in 2019 thanks to the generosity of Deighan Wealth Advisors.

REVERSIBLE ROLES: MEGHAN BRADY

Meghan Brady, Blue + Gold Gardenhead 2018, oil on canvas

Meghan Brady’s large-scale paintings and collages are brought to life through intense color saturation and dynamic, abstract forms. The compositions are vibrantly structured with unadulterated blues, intense yellows, and oranges. The focal point of the exhibition is a work titled Everyday that spans over 16 feet and explores shape and form on a grand scale. The artist states, “The container form—human or otherwise—is a jumping off point to do what I want to do, which is to construct, deconstruct, and hopefully land somewhere totally unexpected.” Brady also layers bold colors, such as acidic green over deep blue, as a means of creating unique shapes in her compelling compositions. The use of saturated color and powerful gestural marks articulate Brady’s exploration of energetic geometric forms and how they relate to each other.

The selected works of Reversible Roles involve both the concept of representation and abstraction and explore how the negative spaces—the spaces created between and around color—can become the focal point of the piece. Brady explains, “Negative shapes are the by-product of cutting shapes from canvas and these shapes transform from negative to positive in the course of one quick decision.” These works are the culmination of Brady’s practice of working with diverse media, including ceramics, woodcut, collage, and oil paint as a means of expanding her creative praxis and extending her process. Brady adds, “Reversible Roles is about the possibility of upending expectations by swapping places. Or in the case of painting, turning them upside down, placing them on the floor, or cutting them in half.” Producing works of this size is a challenging endeavor. The physicality of this process is like a dance between artist and canvas and this corporeality infuses the paintings with energy, spirit, and life.

BIG ROCK CANDY MOUNTAIN: ZACH HORN

Zach Horn, Tomatoes 2018, graphite on arches

 

Boston-based artist Zach Horn has created an exhibition where food and landscape take center stage. Horn has depicted key ingredients of a picnic: a watermelon, sliced cucumbers, a hot dog, bowls of spaghetti and even a life-sized gingham blanket. A massive graphite drawing of a cave functions like a backdrop that allows the viewer to almost step into the scene. In another area, the viewer confronts a three-dimensional sculpture of a yellow-hued mountain range that curiously projects from the wall.

Pattern and repetition are prominently featured throughout these selected works. In the large graphite drawing Tomatoes, 2018, the artist has meticulously rendered slices of tomatoes placed in perfect rows. Horn states, “The food pictures are arranged in symmetrical abstraction, often with a closed composition. It’s recognizable form, but it is couched in the language of spiritual abstraction: patterns, mandalas, the grid, and the sublime landscape”. The artist’s celebration of routine daily tasks and the importance of coming together around food have inspired these compositions. The repetitive act of carefully preparing ingredients for the family meal may be a ruminative experience, just as drawing may be a meditative act. Ultimately, Horn invites the viewer to contemplate feelings evoked through food and the environment.

EDGING FORWARD: RICHARD KEEN

Richard Keen, Form Singularity No. 107 2017, acrylic and oil on canvas

 

Maine-based artist Richard Keen explores abstraction in both paintings and mixed media, wall-oriented sculptures. Keen states that “experiences are brought into focus by removing unnecessary detail, often simplifying the world into line, shape, color and texture.” In his paintings there are often predominant solid shapes, sometimes further accentuated by precisely painted pin-striped lines, that occupy other expanses of color. Imbued with order and clarity, the angular forms in Keen’s paintings seem to be derived from aerial views of the landscape. Dominant central shapes often have smaller lines that are like pathways or roads, leading the eye off the picture plane.Shapes that emerge in Keen’s paintings inform his wall sculptures—often incorporating surfaces created by sanding though successive layers of paint. Originally inspired by the undersides of boats being stripped of paint, Keen’s revelation of these layers of history is integral to his process. The quirky, enigmatic forms created by the artist integrate objects such discarded wood and other found materials.  Using polyester resin, fillers and spray enamel, Keen brings together these contrasting surfaces within his singular compositions.

Jerri Finch Works Showcased at Thos. Moser in Freeport

Belfast artist Jerri Finch is pleased to be part of the Thos. Moser Winter-Spring Show, “Maine’s Four Seasons for Art” at Thos. Moser Cabinetmakers in Freeport.

Featuring work by David Little and introducing artists Kristine Biegel, Richard William Blanchard, Mark Coates, Jerri Finch, Lisa Kyle, David D. Pearce, Lea’ Peterson, Donald Rainville and Andrea Rouda.

Ongoing exhibitors include Linda Bail, Philip Barter, Andre’ Benoit, Tom Curry, David Estey, Philip Frey, Anne Ireland, James Kucheman, Ann Mohnkern, Don Ripper, Marguerite Robichaux and Judy Taylor.

The show concludes April 29, 2019.

Dowling Walsh Gallery Hosts a Performative Drawing Project by Connie Hayes

 

Connie Hayes, Nick Ruffin, 2019, Graphite on paper, 13″ x 9 1/2″

For the months of January and February, Connie Hayes will draw one hundred portraits at Dowling Walsh Gallery of people from a cross section of the community. This performative drawing project will create a visual dialogue and representation of our area through the artist’s work. Each drawing is available for $100, with one hundred percent of the proceeds gifted to an organization chosen by the subject of the drawing.

For more information, visit us online at www.dowlingwalsh.com  or call 207-596-0084

Sara Hotchkiss Workshop Dates

 

Weave a Rug/Color Your Home Workshop Experience 2-day class:
Class fee: $275, includes all materials and lunch.
Maximum 4 students.
Dates May 22-23, August 21-22.

Weave a Tapestry Rug/Color Your Home Workshop Experience 3-day class:
Class fee: $400, includes all materials and lunch.
Maximum 4 students.
June 4-5-6, July 9-10-11, September 10-11-12, October 29,30-31

Email sararugweaver@gmail.com for registration

The Workshop

The first day we will begin at 10am and work until 5 or 6pm. The second (and third) day we start at 9am and usually work until 6pm. We gather for lunch in my sunroom/dining room or outside on the patio (weather permitting) for a delicious and nutritious homemade lunch with as many locally sourced products as possible – sometimes from my own garden. Snacks and tea are available throughout the day.

The dates and fees are listed above. Payment is required in advance and with registration.
Download and fill out the registration form but please call me at 207-832-8133 first to check availability of class dates you prefer. If you need housing there are several comfortable places to stay in Waldoboro and options will be listed when you receive your registration form. Please email me if you have any questions or special requests.

The Location

The studio is located in the coastal town of Waldoboro, about 1 and half hours north of Portland, Maine. We are nestled between two fields bordered with magnificent old oak trees along with a few evergreens and a collection of crabapples I planted years ago. You may be lucky enough to be here when the lavender – all 130 plants – in the front yard is in full bloom. The sound of the honey bees and the bumblebees will make your heart smile. Behind the studio is a modest vegetable garden full of the usual plants and a handful of weird things. It is fun to find out how well they will grow. Pollinator plants such as curly leaf mullein, echinaceas, and daisies grow amongst the vegetables. I also plant a handful of dye plants like indigo, weld, woad, and calendula. There is a walnut tree at my neighbors so I have a few babies – thanks to the squirrels, who also leave piles of chewed walnut hulls for me to use for dye. Everything is symbiotic here.

Inside the Studio

Currently there are 6 looms in my loom studio. 4 looms available for workshop students and the large 10 and 12 foot looms where I weave larger rugs. Small frame looms hang on pegs on the walls. Yarn is all over the place. It is not exactly tidy, though I make an effort. I invite you to be inspired and productive. The classes are relaxed and students are encouraged to work at their own pace. I teach the basic fundamentals of rug weaving with fabric, offer support, and if everyone in class is busy weaving on their own then I work on my own projects in the studio alongside them.

Finishing techniques are also taught. I structure the classes as if we are both interior designer and student, meaning the student tells me their color inspiration and requirements and I turn that into a fabric swatch board that they approve before class. I prepare the looms with warp that is color coordinated with the student’s fabric, and prepare the weft fabric.

whopaints Gallery and Studio Winter Classes

Premise: The Artist as Truth Seeker and Perception Conveyor

Thursday afternoons 3-5:00.

Feb 7th – Drawing Fundamentals
Feb 14th- Oil painting: colors and mediums,
Feb 21st- Starting a Figure Drawing
Feb 28th- Assessment of a piece

They are free. Each can be taken alone, however all 4 will build to final class.
For more information on each session visit www.whopaints.com

Cynthia Winings Gallery’s MID-WINTER Valentine’s Day Show


The Cynthia Winings Gallery in Blue Hill presents: The Mid-Winter Valentine’s Day Show: A group exhibition featuring the artworks of Louise Bourne, Jenny Brillhart, Molly Blake, Avy Claire, Devta Doolan, Sarah Doremus, Heather Lyon, Buzz Masters, Bill Mayher, Cynthia Winings and Goody-B. Wiseman!

 

Buzz Masters

 

 

Evening Reception: Friday, February 8, 5:00 – 8PM. 

Please Join me for this One Day Event where the Art will Warm Your Heart And Soul – There will be Refreshments and Good Company, too.
PLEASE DRESS WARMLY. Everyone is Welcome!

It’s A Black And White Affair at Markings Gallery

Jo Diggs

 

 Artists have worked in black and white since someone first put ink to paper. The concept is a simple choice between things that are clearly opposites. Through the ages to today, black and white is used in many art forms including wood block prints, photography, charcoal and ink drawing and print making to name but a few.

 

Passion by Barbara Burns

 

Pablo Picasso’s,  Guernica (1937) painted in black, white, and grays remains one of the most moving and powerful antiwar paintings in history. Picasso does not want us to passively look, but to imagine this terrible moment from the inside. Colors let us off lightly; black and white forces us to think without the distraction of color.

Working in black and white makes the artist and the viewer concentrate on elements such as composition, value, lighting and form. Of course, color is a vital step, but the benefit of black and white is that you can focus on the image as a whole without the distraction of color. In fashion, black and white is considered sophisticated.  It is the easiest and the most timeless color pairing. Interesting silhouettes and textures are easily achieved as an enhancement.
Markings Gallery in Bath has created a black and white exhibit which highlights the work of many of their artists. Marianne Senechal’s black and white felted shawl is a stunning example of black and white in fashion along with Kirsten Sandoy’s beautiful felted hats. Jo Diggs’ hand appliqué work is remarkable in its skill and composition. Barbara Burns’ tapestries are wonderful examples of the power of black and white in art, expressing the feminine and Susan Mills’ shamanic, felted works are inspired by nature, by the physical world and the world of spirit.
Join us at Markings Gallery February 17, from 12-4 pm  to honor the tradition of working in black and white by viewing our exhibit It’s A Black & White Affair. Barbara Burns will be demonstrating tapestry weaving in back and white. Refreshments will be served and many of our wonderful stable of artists will be there for you to meet.
The gallery is open Thurs- Mon, 10-5.

Yikes Studio: Enamel Class and Limited Necklace Sale

Beach Cascade

 

SALE

Four, beautiful, long, statement necklaces on sale for a limited time only. These necklaces traveled with me this fall to a couple shows but a match has yet to be made for these beauties! The necklaces are one-of-a-kind and very limited. The sale runs through end of Feb. To view images and purchase go to www.suzanneanderson.me

CLASSES

Sign up now for this basic introduction to the art of enameling. Learn the magic of fusing colored glass to metal. This 4 hour class will cover all the basic techniques: applying powdered glass, scrafitto, liquid enamels, metal prep, firing, finishing and creating simple earrings and a pendant. The cost for the class is $80 + $20 materials fee. Class size is limited to 5.

Saturday, February 16, 9:30-1:30 SOLD OUT!
Sunday, Feb 17, 9:30-1:30 limited space still available

The classes are being held at Rebecca Krupke Studio, 9 Central St. Suite 308,  Bangor. To sign up visit: www.rebeccakrupke.com

Biennial Artist Eleanor Kipping Performs at CMCA

Artist Eleanor Kipping performs her piece, Strange Fruit.

 

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA) invites the public to join artist Eleanor Kipping for a performance in conjunction with her installation, Strange Fruit, on view in the CMCA Biennial. The performance will take place on Sunday, January 27, at 3pm. The event is free to CMCA members, others with admission.

Referencing pop culture iconography and American history, Kipping’s work addresses the Black female experience, taking pause to reflect on sexuality, physicality, and the knowledge of The Other. Kipping encourages community engagement, asking the viewer to examine intra/interracial terrains in their own lives and regions. Strange Fruit serves as both installation and performance space, and explores the relationship between historical and contemporary political race relations in the United States.

During the performance, the artist sits in the white rocking chair at the center of the installation. She mourns, celebrates, and muses while humming, singing, and reciting prose, lyrics, and notes from a small book. The book remains in the space for the audience to experience or recite from after the performance. The installation serves as an altar, a mythological Ancestral plain, or even a shrine.

Kipping received a Bachelor of Science from the New England School of Communication and a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Maine.

The CMCA Biennial is on view through March 3, 2019. Support for the Biennial is provided by First National Bank. For more information, visit cmcanow.org.