Author Archive for Anthony Anderson – Page 2

ArtLab for All Ages – January 5, 2-4pm

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA) invites artists of all ages to discover the infinite possibilities of textiles, fibers, and fabric collage during January’s ArtLab for All Ages on Saturday, January 5, from 2 to 4pm. Looking to the works of Biennial exhibition artists Baxter KoziolWilloughby Lukas Hastings and Isabelle O’Donnell, participants will experiment with craft techniques such as sewing and assemblage to explore symbol, design, and narrative.

Led by instructor Alexis Iammarino, ArtLab for All Ages takes place at CMCA, 21 Winter Street, Rockland, on the first Saturday of every month and is always free and open to all. Support for ArtLab is provided in part by the The Cricket Foundation, Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation, Morton-Kelly Charitable Trust, Nellie Leaman Taft Foundation, and individual donors.

 

Catch the Fall Exhibitions at the Colby Museum

Torkwase Dyson, Nautical Dusk installation, 2018

 

The Colby College Museum of Art creates academically robust and engaging exhibitions. This fall, the Colby Museum is pleased to present the following exhibitions: Torkwase Dyson: Nautical Dusk (through January 6, 2019), Darkness Visible: Goya Prints from the Lunder Collection (through January 20, 2019), Nancy Spero: Unbound (through January 20, 2019), and Currents 8: Carly Glovinski (through February 17, 2019).

Torkwase Dyson: Nautical Dusk
At the invitation of the Museum, the New Jersey-based artist Torkwase Dyson visited Waterville to consult archival materials related to Samuel Osborne (c. 1833–1904). Born into slavery on a Virginia plantation, Osborne migrated to Maine in 1865 and served as a Colby College janitor from 1867 to 1903. In the works she produced for Nautical Dusk, Dyson combines simple geometric forms infused with metaphorical associations found in obituaries of Osborne written by unnamed white authors. These texts raise questions about authorship, transmission, and self-determination, all issues that she will continue to unpack over the run of the show. Nautical Dusk features sculptures and paintings that explore these subjects in a formal register through intimacy, liquidity, and reflectiveness. What results are expanded dimensions of space. Occupying half the gallery is a work entitled Dusk, a monolithic ramp that functions as an architectural intervention, activating the space and inviting engagement or contemplation. It suggests a promontory, an outcropping from which to scan or surveil, but also a structure partially submerged.

Torkwase Dyson (b. 1973) was born in Chicago, Illinois, and spent her developmental years between North Carolina and Mississippi before earning her BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University and her MFA from the Yale School of Art. She was recently included in the 2018 group exhibition Between the Waters at the Whitney Museum of American Art and will be included in the 2019 Sharjah Biennial.

 

Carly Glovinski, Canyon Picnic, 2018. Acrylic on laser-cut plexiglass; acrylic on paper, photographs, plexiglass, wood.

 

Currents 8: Carly Glovinski
Established by the Colby Museum in 2004, the Currents exhibition series is dedicated to emerging artists with connections to Maine. For the eighth installment of the series, Carly Glovinski has created a group of works for a two-part exhibition on the theme of landscape that is on view currently at the Colby Museum and the Waterville Public Library. At the Colby Museum the commissioned works include painted sculptures and works on paper inspired by works in the Lunder Collection, several of which are on view in an adjacent gallery arranged by the artist. For the portion of the exhibition mounted at the Waterville Public Library, Glovinski has produced a group of three-dimensional paintings that closely resemble books in the library’s collection. These painted objects are exhibited on the library’s shelves. Designed to be explored by the hand and eye, they can be discovered by library patrons via a finding aid.

The Currents 8 catalogue will be available in late 2018 and will feature essays by Lunder Curator of American Art Elizabeth Finch and the writer Heidi Julavits.

Carly Glovinski (b. 1981) holds a BFA from Boston University and has shown her work nationally. She grew up in Berwick, Maine, and has a studio in nearby Rollinsford, New Hampshire.

 

Francisco de Goya, El sueño de la razón produce monstruos from Los Caprichos, 1799. Bound set of 80 intaglios on cream laid paper, 12 1/4 x 8 1/8 x 7/8 in.

 

Darkness Visible: Goya Prints from the Lunder Collection
During his lifetime the Spanish artist Francisco de Goya (1746–1828) was known for his commissioned works, but his independently produced prints are arguably his greatest achievement. This focused exhibition from the Lunder Collection includes a bound copy of Goya’s Los Caprichos (1799), accompanied by a digital resource that allows visitors to see an image of each print in the order Goya established for the series. The exhibition also includes a 19th-century commentary, or “key” to the series, by an unknown writer.

Darkness Visible: Goya Prints from the Lunder Collection is organized to coincide with an exhibition of the work of Nancy Spero (1926–2009), one of many artists who have been inspired by Goya’s visionary creations as a graphic artist.

 

Nancy Spero, Liberty – Athlete, 1995. Handprinting and printed collage on paper, 24 1⁄2 x 38 1⁄2 in.

 

Nancy Spero: Unbound
For more than five decades, Nancy Spero (1926–2009) pioneered a feminist art practice that fiercely defied the social expectations imposed on women. Using a lexicon of appropriated imagery, Spero envisioned, as she observed in 1987, “all manner of processions, conflicts, interruptions and disruptions.” Her hybrid artworks made in protest against war and in celebration of the liberated female body constitute Nancy Spero: Unbound, an exhibition organized in conjunction with a concurrent presentation of Francisco Goya’s prints, which Spero first encountered as an aspiring young artist.

Spanning the artist’s entire career, Nancy Spero: Unbound includes one of her earliest surviving works: a lithograph dating from around 1950, depicting an ecstatic dancer whose outstretched limbs resist containment. In 1966, when Spero initiated a truculent series of drawings to protest the Vietnam War, she began to work primarily on and with paper, a material she preferred for its versatility and economy. She subsequently introduced the use of collaged images made from cutouts of her prints. She also joined paper sheets end to end to create vertical and horizontal scrolls, often composing on a monumental scale.

The expressions of ecstasy and protest that defined Spero’s early practice gave way to representations of the female subject as an “activator” in works derived from found and altered images, sometimes with accompanying quotations. Late in life Spero explored her visual lexicon in new and even more expansive sites, drawing and printing directly on the wall and revisiting her Vietnam War–era imagery to create one of her last major works, Maypole: Take No Prisoners II (2008), a towering, multi-part sculpture that serves as the exhibition’s arresting centerpiece.

Handworks Gallery shows work of Kevin H. Adams

 

Handworks Gallery in Blue Hill is showing paintings by Kevin H. Adams and an exceptional collection of local and Maine art, contemporary craft, and jewelry. Founded in 1975, the gallery represents a diversity of established and emerging artists. Much of the work is one-of-a-kind and new work is added throughout the year.

Handworks Gallery is located in the center of the small coastal village of Blue Hill in a wonderful old building that was formerly the Blue Hill Department Store. The gallery incorporates the quirks of an old building and enjoys its charms including old fashioned tin ceilings.

Stop in and enjoy the abundance of creativity. We’re an ideal source for those special gifts that are one of a kind, thoughtfully created, and meaningful.

Open from May – December and open for selected hours during the winter season. FMI https://handworksgallery.org/

Betts Gallery celebrates annual ‘Holiday Galleria’

 

This December, Betts Gallery celebrates the holidays with their annual ‘Holiday Galleria’ show, joining in on the Belfast Holiday Artwalk with an opening reception, Friday December 7th, 5:30-8pm. The exhibit of local, affordable art, in a variety of media includes works by: Sally Brophy, Jennie Connor, Susan Cooney, Julie Cyr, Kris Engman, Sarah Faragher, Helene Ferrar, Conny Hatch, David Jacobson, Sheep Jones, Mark Kelly, Allegra Kuhn, Kathleen Mack, Leslie Moore, Willy Reddick, Wes Reddick, Betty Schopmeyer, Lesia Sochor, Kay Sullivan, Mary Trotochaud and Peter Walls. Be sure to check in often, as the show, which runs from December 7th through the 22nd, will be changing throughout the month as sold pieces are replaced by new work.

Markings Gallery hosting Holiday Party Dec. 14

 

Perhaps the best Yuletide decoration is being wreathed in smiles.

Markings Gallery, 50 Front St., will be hosting a holiday party on December 14 as part of the Bright Lights Festival in Downtown Bath.

Join the artists of Markings Gallery from 5-8 pm. We have Nick Stone and Craig Sipe, two Maine authors and poets reading their poetry along with our own Barbara Burns reading as well.  Refreshments, libations and good will for all!

Littlefield Gallery’s 2018 Online Holiday Show

Amy Pollien “The Celadone Vase” oil on panel 36 x 24

To shop Littlefield Gallery’s Holiday show online go to https://conta.cc/2Rp2xn2. The gallery is closed for the season except for by appointment.  info@littlefieldgallery.com   207.963.6005

8x10x100 and Holiday Members Show at The Harlow

The Harlow is home of the Kennebec Valley Art Association, a non-profit celebrating its 60th anniversary on December 1, 2018. The public is invited to celebrate the occasion and attend the opening reception for both 8x10x100 and our annual Holiday Members Show & Sale on Saturday, December 1st from 5-7pm.  Both are on view from December 1-29.
  • During8x10x100, all artworks measure 8×10 inches and are available for sale for the affordable price of $100 each. 50% of sales benefit programming at The Harlow while the other 50% goes directly to the artist.
  • The Harlow’s annual Holiday Members Show & Sale celebrates the diverse artwork styles of Harlow artist members and is a tradition dating back to the founding of the Gallery in 1963.
  • During both the 8x10x100 and the Members Show, work by Maine artists representing a wide range of media can be purchased off the wall and taken home the same day. The public is invited to visit The Harlow and support local artists by choosing unique and handcrafted gifts this holiday season.

Exhibitions are always free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Wednesday-Saturday, 12-6pm.

Tis’ the Season at D’Alessio Studio

Russell D’Alessio, Garden Night

 

Russell D’Alessio, Fortune Teller with Rose Colored Glasses

 

Black Friday, Cyber Monday, Small Business Saturday, on and on…time for a break, relax, take a zen moment and enjoy some art! The gallery is closed for the season but all works are available online at www.rdalessioart.com.  

Famed Photographer William Wegman Creates Limited Edition Print to Benefit MOFGA and CMCA

William Wegman, “Topper,” 30 x 24 inches, limited edition print produced by the artist to benefit the Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA) and the Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association (MOFGA).

Famed photographer William Wegman, known worldwide for his witty and strikingly human photographs of his Weimaraners, has created an exclusive limited-edition print to benefit two Maine nonprofits, the Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association (MOFGA) and the Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA). Titled, “Topper,” the 30 x 24 inch print, produced in an edition of 10, pictures Wegman’s dog Topper seated against a coral pink background and wearing a “wig” of curly leaf lettuce. A classic Wegman image, each print is $8,000, and is individually signed and numbered by the artist. The full purchase price of each print directly supports MOFGA and CMCA equally.

William Wegman’s work, which includes photographs, videos, paintings and drawings, has been exhibited in museums and galleries internationally, including the recent exhibition “Before/On/After: William Wegman and California Conceptualism” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. An exhibition of his early videos and related drawings, entitled “Reel to Real,” was held at CMCA in Rockland, Maine, in summer 2017.

Wegman, who is 74, first visited Maine as a boy and has been returning ever since, finding much of the inspiration for his work in the time he spends at his home and studio in the Rangeley Lakes.

CMCA executive director, Suzette McAvoy, says, “We are grateful to artist William Wegman and his wife Christine Burgin for this opportunity to partner with MOFGA in offering this wonderful print to benefit both organizations. If you love great art and support a healthy future for Maine communities, this is a meaningful way to contribute.”

MOFGA excutive director, Sarah Alexander, adds, “This generous donation is an exciting way to support both organic argriculture and the arts. We deeply appreciate Bill and Christine’s generous gift and inspiring work.”

The “Topper” prints may be purchased online through CMCA’s website, www.cmcanow.org/shop or by emailing info@cmcanow.org. A framed print is available for viewing in the CMCA Shop at 21 Winter Street in Rockland. For additional information, please call 207-701-5005.

Winter Harbor Holiday Shopping Night at whopaints Gallery and Studio

It is that time of year! Come party at whopaints Gallery & Studio Thursday December 6th.  There will several artists bringing their beautiful hand crafted items including  Rusted Pulchritude and Downeast Thunder Farms.  The Studio will be open all day long and festivities will begin around 5 with food, drink and song.  If you have an art or craft you would like to bring, send an email at who@whopaints.com!