Archive for Announcement

Dowling Walsh Gallery hosting three exhibitions for October

Tollef Runquist, Carrying Cake, 2019, Oil on canvas, 54″ x 60″

 

Dowling Walsh Gallery will host three exhibitions in the month of October for Tollef Runquist, Sarah McRae Morton, and Reggie Burrows Hodges

Opening Friday, October 4th from 5-8pm in conjunction with Rockland First Friday Art Walk.

Tollef Runquist

Tollef Runquist received his B.A. in Studio Art from Dickinson College in 2002. Since then he has been continuing his education through painting and other mediums. He lives and works in Searsport, Maine. He has had solo exhibitions at Taylor Gallery, Meriden, NH; Ober Gallery, Kent, CT; and OK Harris, New York, NY; among others. Runquist looks at a wide range of artists as inspiration including Richard Diebenkorn, Monet, De Kooning, Gauguin, Bonnard, Rothko, Sargent, Gordon Grant, Gerhard Richter, Hopper, Homer, Klimt and Egon Schiele.

Runquist states, “Painting for me is an undertaking of appreciation and inquiry. It is a means by which to engage the beauty and mystery of visual experience in an ongoing dialogue. This is a widening puzzle; as I partake in this conversation, it continually refreshes itself, revealing unexpected angles and new understanding. I feel no particular loyalty to realism or my own past work. I set to draw out a particular vision as long as my experience with it is visceral, attentive and useful. I try to encapsulate the fullness of my experience of a moment; weight and stillness, burning edges, massive calm. These move me towards a particular subject, I try to paint and honor them, and then move on.”

 

Sarah McRae Morton, The Half Life of Luck, Frank Morley Fletcher Twist Morton in the Clover, Oil on line, 60″ x 60″

 

Sarah McRae Morton

Sarah McRae Morton grew up in rural Lancaster County Pennsylvania, where she still keeps a hayloft studio above the horse stalls in her family’s barn. Sarah attended the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the University of Pennsylvania. She has studied chemical composition of paintings in Rome as well as studied with Odd Nerdrum in Norway. Sarah received a Mattisse Foundation fellowship for her work on the local history of West Virginia, and attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Her work has been exhibited across the country, including at the Vermont Studio Center. She currently lives and paints in Cologne, Germany.

Sarah McRae Morton’s paintings are invented portraits of her ancestors and historical figures – people from her own life, from books and paintings, and from her travels and stories learned. The events and people illustrated are not bound by time or fact, but are imbued with ghosts and artifacts from cross sections of history. Sarah’s work is wildly romantic, with an earthy palate and energetic movement around the canvas that quiets on key moments – detailed renderings of the face of a bear, the lips of a lover, the fox stole around a poet’s neck. The paintings seem to flicker to life with her spirited brush strokes.

 

Reggie Burrows Hodges, First Serve, Hands Behind Your Back, Acrylic on canvas, 58″ x 84″

 

Reggie Burrows Hodges

Reggie Burrows Hodges is a narrative figurative painter whose work centers around visual metaphor and storytelling. He works primarily large-scale on raw canvas, wood and rag paper with acrylic and pastel — exploring themes such as identity, truth, surveillance, and often childhood memories. As method, Hodges paints from a black ground, developing the environment around the figure so it emerges from its surroundings, examining the possibility that we are all products of our environment.

Hodges attended the University of Kansas studying theatre and film. He is currently an adjunct professor at the Maine College of Art teaching Cinematic Storytelling, Character Design and Professional Studio Development in Animation and Game Arts. Hodges has been the recipient of numerous artist residencies including the Ellis- Beauregard Foundation, Stephen Pace House and Monson Arts.

 

Dowling Walsh Gallery is located at 365 Main Street in Rockland, Maine, directly across from the Farnsworth Art Museum. Gallery Hours, Tuesday through Saturday from 10am – 5pm, and by appointment on Sunday and Monday.

For more information, visit us online at www.dowlingwalsh.com  or call 207-596-0084

Cove St. Arts opening for “Exquisite Beauty”

Join us on Thursday, September 19 from 5-7 pm for the Opening Reception of: Exquisite Beauty. The enduring legacy of grace.
The exhibition, curated by Indigo Arts Alliance co-founder Marcia Minter, showcases the international photography of two Maine artists, David Caras and Meredith Kennedy.
“Grace,” as a noun, refers to the elegance or beauty of form, manner, motion or action. As a verb, it means to confer dignity or honor upon a subject. Through the work of two Portland-based artists, Marcia Minter curated an exhibition that explores both concepts.
The Cuba-based work of photographer David Caras depicts everyday life set in decaying colonial grandeur. Meredith Kennedy transports the viewer to the other side of the globe, to Asia and to scenes immediately recognizable as foreign whether depicting frenetic city streets or quiet village scenes.In both artists’ work, there is an elegance of form and a beauty in the human environments depicted. Through their lenses, Caras and Kennedy document the dignity in their subjects and confer that dignity upon the viewer by evoking our shared humanity across cultures and the often exquisite (acute, even painful) beauty we create.
Marcia Minter is the co-founder of Indigo Arts Alliance, VP Creative Director of L.L. Bean, and a member of the board of trustees of the Portland Museum of Art.

Cynthia Winings Gallery opening for “Reverant Outcomes”

Image: M P Landis, Acrylic on canvas, 16 x 16 inches

Cynthia Winings Gallery Presents “Reverant Outcomes”  a group exhibition with an Opening Reception: Sunday September 22 4 – 7PM

With New Work for Season VII from:
Louise Bourne Josephine Burr Tom Curry David Hornung Christine Lafuente Joanna Logue Buzz Masters Bill Mayher Libby Mitchell Carol Pelletier Jerry Rose Lari Washburn. And in the New Sculpture Garden: Ray Carbone Rebekah Raye Melita Westerlund and John Wilkinson! The Cynthia Winings Gallery is pleased to present the fifth group exhibition of the season  Reverent Outcomes. Everyone is warmly invited to the Opening Reception Sunday September 22 4 – 7 PM. On view  September 17 – October 14

“Art Harvest” Sums Up Stable Gallery’s season

Daisy Greene “Moon Mosaic,”

 

The Stable Gallery in Damariscotta inaugurated its final 2019 show, “Art Harvest,” this week.  The gallery will hold an artists’ reception open to the public on Friday, September 20, from 5 to 7pm.

“Art Harvest” suggests a culmination and gathering-in, conclusion of a summer’s work.  This final show of the gallery’s season will run through October 18.

Featured painter Daisy Greene’s popular work is sometimes whimsical and sometimes mysterious.  It always exhibits a carefully-crafted color palette.  “Moon Mosaic,” in acrylic, perfectly demonstrates Greene’s simplified forms, poetic conception, and blend of warmth and coolness.  The resulting painting creates a powerful mood.

Also featured are painters Penelope Moodey, Caroline Clare Davis, and Christopher Reed; sculptors Marnie Sinclair and Laura Freeman; jeweler Mary Hall; ceramicist Lori Watts; and fiber artist Janet Percival.

The Stable Gallery strives to present truly individual and high-quality art and fine crafts by Maine artists.  The gallery is housed in a 19th-century Victorian Stable, at 28 Water Street in Damariscotta.  The Gallery is open daily 10AM-5PM until October 18. For more information call the gallery at 563-19991.

Sara Hotchkiss open for Maine Craft Weekend

The woven colors of fall. . .

The best kind of blues to have — a handwoven rug stippled in shades of indigo and navy blues highlighted with shades of pale blue and beige. The whole rug is shown below.

The annual MAINE CRAFT WEEKEND will take place on Saturday, October 5th and Sunday, October 6th. This annual statewide tour of Maine craft studios, businesses and events is a great opportunity to explore the life and work of craft artists and businesses in Maine, and for artists to connect with craft enthusiasts, collectors and visitors.

My showroom and studio will be open from 12-4pm each day. and I look forward to seeing you.

In addition to a selection of my work that will be available for sale, a fellow craftsperson and excellent felter, Wayne Myers, will be on hand with his felted shawls and fleece from his heritage breed sheep.

AND…the Weavers Garage Sale – a not-so-curated collection of textile tools, fabric, a few looms, and weird weaver stuff, with 10% of sales going to the Maine Fiberarts organization. Stay tuned for more details about the Maine Craft Weekend in the next newsletter.

For more information about Maine Craft Weekend, visit www.mainecraftweekend.org .

 

 

Colin Page artist talk at Greenhut

Colin Page Behind Fish Beach, oil on canvas, 24 x 36 inches

 

Please join us!
 Saturday, Sept. 21 at 1pm
Colin will talk about the work from his current solo exhibition “Color Notes”
Exhibition continues through September 28
Event is free and open to the public
Please note, seating is limited, first come, first served
 
In September, Greenhut is pleased to present Color Notes, an exhibition of new oil paintings by one of Maine’s most masterful, and most popular, plein air artists, Colin Page. As Press Herald art critic, Daniel Kany puts it, “Page is a leading light of what is called ‘Maine painting’ — that striking, quick and largely improvisational style of observational painting that ranges from Winslow Homer to Don Stone; Maine painting blends a bold brush with atmospheric light and an ever-present sense of place.” Colin shares a bit about his personal process and inspiration in his artist statement below:
The spark of an interesting color or light sensation inspires me to start a painting. A color relationship can create a mood, describe a time of day, give depth to a flat canvas, and emulate a vibration or glow. With this series, I begin each painting with a specific color idea: a harmonious color key or a discordant contrasting key. The paintings are not exact replicas of a scene, but instead are driven by the mood and story I can tell with color and brushwork.
 
This creative use of color is sometimes described in musical terms. Color notes are individual moments that sing when placed in relation to one another. When there is an overall color scheme to a painting, it forms a harmony that can be felt in a way similar to a musical key in a song. A color can be read as discordant but still be the right note. Colors can work together to create the equivalent uplift of a major chord, or the slight sad turn of a minor. A painting is not a copy of nature, but a composition that describes a feeling.      
 
Color is just one tool of communication that I use, but the power and depth of this expression directs my decisions when I consider what to paint, and why.
 
Colin Page was raised in Baltimore, Maryland and studied painting at the Rhode Island School of Design and at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. Whether working on location or in the studio, Colin strives to capture the atmosphere and light of a scene. Colin currently lives in Maine, where he focuses on painting the landscape, and scenes that show his life as a father of two young girls. His work has been featured in solo exhibitions and group shows nationally and abroad

 

New Works at D’Alessio Gallery

“Joy with Butterflies” original multi media india ink, acrylic, gold dust & gold leaf on canvas 36″ x 24″

I am frequently asked “how long it takes for Russ to paint a piece?” My answer is always the same, sometimes a piece is created in a day or two, sometimes they are in the studio a year or more. It depends on how the story is playing out for him as he goes back and forth between many canvases as it all unfolds.

Not often, but sometimes Russ will come to the gallery and take a painting off the wall and bring it back to the studio to finish. I know you are thinking if it is hanging on the wall in the gallery it is finished, yes, that is what I also believe, sometimes, just sometimes that piece is speaking to him to continue that story one step further. This happened a few weeks ago with “Incognito.”

If you have been in the gallery recently you may have seen this work hanging and perhaps thought like me it was wonderful…13 friends strutting their style. Russ adding more of his artistic flair has made it  fantastic! The addition of gold leaf and gold dust in the background plus color shifts in their attire make you feel like the women are strutting right off the canvas. Three years later, it is finished. For me, I want to know what the pink bird knows? 

D’Alessio Gallery is located at 12 Mt. Desert St. in Bar Harbor, Maine

Announcements from the Maine Crafts Association

Maine Craft Weekend, a annual statewide tour of Maine craft studios, businesses and events is right around the corner! Maine Craft Weekend offers an opportunity for the public to explore the life and work of craft artists and businesses in Maine, and for artists to connect with craft enthusiasts, collectors and visitors behind-the-scenes. This is an educational, community-oriented and family-friendly event for all! Are you ready?

Not on the tour yet? There is still time to get a web and map listing, follow the link below. Listings include a year round directory presence, a map listing + link, social media outreach, and branded posters+rackcards for $25. We’ve extended the submission deadline to: 
Saturday, September 7, 2019

 

This year we are featuring Belfast, Bucksport, Ellsworth, Hallowell and Waterville!

Featured Cities offer a weekend-full of events, which means opportunities for pop-up exhibitions, artist-collaborations with breweries, live music, artist talks, trunk shows and much more.

If you are a artist/maker/event in or near a Featured City, reach out to your city contact about getting on the tour:

Belfast director@ourtownbelfast.org

Bucksport megkeay444@gmail.com

Ellsworth heidi@artfulaide.com and cara@heartofellsworth.org

Hallowell nrudy@hallowellmaine.org and fahyhallowell@gmail.com

Waterville msugden@watervillecreates.org

 

 

UMaine Museum of Art announces Fall Exhibitions

The University of Maine Museum of Art, located at 40 Harlow Street in downtown Bangor, opens three new exhibitions in September 2019. UMMA is open Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am – 5 pm and brings modern and contemporary art to the region, presenting approximately 12 original exhibitions each year. UMMA’s fall shows open to the public on September 13 and run through December 21, 2019. Admission to the Museum of Art is free in 2019 thanks to the generosity of Deighan Wealth Advisors.

JOAN BELMAR Polaris, 2019

WAY STATIONS: JOAN BELMAR
September 13 – December 21, 2019

Way Stations features a stunning assortment of new abstract paintings by New York-based artist Joan Belmar. Spherical forms, often filled with transparent textural passages, populate Belmar’s compositions and are often combined with segmented lines, dots, and portal-like constructions. “Circles represent the infinite”, says Belmar, adding that they “suggest, like a Russian doll that contains one inside the other, world or way stations within other worlds.”

Belmar offers multiple vantage points and structures in his compositions. It’s as if we are looking at surface topographies of unnamed planets through a telescope, or perhaps glancing down at outstretched maps to plot routes through unknown terrain. A focal point of the exhibition is an expansive wall showcasing two tondo paintings, each 92 inches in diameter, which were created especially for the UMMA exhibition. These circular works highlight the collage-like approach and layering seen in many of the artist’s compositions—solid blocks and bands of bold color share space with spherical forms that have a pattern overlay of hand-painted dots.

Belmar was born in Chile and immigrated to the United States in 1999. His works are in the collections of the Microsoft Corporation, Capital One Corporation, and Fidelity Investment, among others.

NINA JEROME Entangled Spring, 2019

 

ENTANGLED: NINA JEROME
September 13 – December 21, 2019

Entangled features a new series of paintings and drawings by Maine-based artist Nina Jerome. Invasive wild grape vines, that Jerome encountered while at a recent artist residency, inspire these exuberant and expressive compositions. Ranging from the monochromatic to vividly colored paintings, the artist has captured the gesture and wild energy of these tangled masses. Jerome states, “the movement and joyful choreography of their entanglement express the variety and excitement of life’s experiences, yet the tangled knots also create obstacles within our interconnected systems.”

A focal point of the exhibition is the large-scale Thicket that is composed of nine individual panels hung in a dramatic grid. Measuring 7 ½ x 7 ½ feet, the work contains a bustling array of overlapping curvilinear lines in bold black with contrasting blue gestural marks. For Jerome the circular forms, “capture the chaos of nature and seems to balance on the edge of beauty and destruction.” In addition to the drawings and monochromatic paintings, the artist also reveals her skill as a colorist. In two striking compositions, Entangled Red and Dance, the artist employs an expressionistic palette—the looping vines are depicted in intense reds while the background is rendered in vivid blues.  The works in Entangled provide an open window to Jerome’s creative process. In the exhibition, one sees the evolution of her art from small, spontaneous and spirited drawings to larger and more structured works on canvas for which the artist is most known.  

ALFREDO GISHOLT Night Studio 1, 2019

STUDIO VISIT: New Works by Six Painters
September 13 – December 21, 2019

Studio Visit brings together a selection of new works by six notable painters working throughout the United States. Ranging from hard-edged to densely layered compositions, this exhibition showcases each artist’s unique approach to abstraction. Intimate 6 x 8 inch oil paintings share space with boldly colored, large-scale canvases, some of which span eight feet.

Thomas Berding’s (East Lansing, Michigan) information-rich paintings live in a perpetual state “between construction and deconstruction, representation and abstraction, addition and deletion”. There’s a spatial complexity to Berding’s paintings in which his raucous assembly of overlapping shapes, bands, shards, and ambiguous detritus seems to recede into infinity.

Joanne Freeman (New York, New York) captures lighthearted gestures in an assortment of hard-edged compositions. Within Freeman’s bold shapes are colors ranging from vivid-blues to saturated reds. The artist sets up a beautiful tension in which these shapes are arranged in close proximity, but do not touch. In several of her new paintings the weight of the larger forms balances the delicateness of the seemingly malleable, slender, red-orange forms.

Alfredo Gisholt’s (Boston, Massachusetts) oil paintings are populated with eccentric forms captured through spirited, gestural brushstrokes. Gisholt’s compositions are both humorous and ominous in the same instance. A mélange of fractured shapes, curvy lines, and other enigmatic devises share space and invite the viewer to invent narratives while also observing the materiality of paint.

Rachel Hellmann’s (Terre Haute, Indiana) shaped compositions explore the intersection of painting and sculpture while offering an interplay of geometry, light, and color. Crafted from poplar wood, Hellman’s forms are meticulously planed, cut, pieced together, glued, clamped, and sanded. The artist’s painted bands depict color relationships that range from monochromatic to vividly bold; the arrangement of the elements is in direct response to the unique qualities of each sculpted form.

In Suzanne Laura Kammin’s (Newark, New Jersey) abstract oil paintings, hard-edged forms unite with transparent gestural brushwork. In compositions that bring to mind the crisp, spray-painted marks of certain types of graffiti, the artist has employed a dynamic palette ranging from vibrant reds and saturated yellows to bold greens. Kammin states that she contrasts “smooth, minimal shapes of pure color against distressed and improvisatory passages to create a sense of expansiveness, magic, and mystery.”

At first glance, Matt Phillips’ (New York, New York) paintings may appear to be rooted solely in rigid geometric abstraction, but within each defined shape are complex and rich passages achieved through delicate brushwork. Phillips’ fractured forms seem to be in a state of fluctuation, as if one is looking at shifting patterns and light through a kaleidoscope.

Cynthia Winings Gallery presents A Conversation with Artist Jenny Brillhart

Jenny Brillhart, Pink House On Route 3, Oil on aluminum

Cynthia Winings Gallery presents A Conversation with Artist Jenny Brillhart, for the First Friday Blue Hill. Join in for casual conversation in the gallery about inspiration, process, and the current show. Talk starts at 5:30 and the gallery is open late. Refreshments provided and everyone is welcome.