Archive for Art Talk

A New Issue of MMPA Antidote Is Available Online

“Morning Web,” by Sal Taylor Kydd.

“It’s always been my philosophy to try to make art out of the everyday and ordinary… it never occurred to me to leave home to make art.” — Sally Mann

In response to COVID-19 stay-at-home orders and local closings, the Maine Museum of Photographic Arts in Portland began creating the online series MMPA Antidote, which includes photographic artwork, audio interviews, and artist statements and reflections from Maine artists, aimed to serve as inspiration during times of isolation.

Joel R. Ferris, a donor who helped launch MMPA, says, “On Fridays after work, I pour a glass of wine and look and read the site and pretend I’m on Portland’s First Friday art walk.”

A new issue of MMPA Antidote is available online at www.mainemuseumofphotographicarts.org.

Investigate the links, share the images, and send some of your own to contact.mmpa@gmail.com.

Virtual Opening for ‘Unnamed for Decades’ solo exhibit by Erin Johnson

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art in Rockland will host its first-ever virtual opening reception from 5 to 6 p.m. June 6 to celebrate the exhibition “Erin Johnson | Unnamed for Decades.”

Spanning two galleries, “Erin Johnson | Unnamed for Decades” presents a series of new, site-specific installations by the artist.

Johnson is the recipient of the second annual Ellis-Beauregard Foundation Fellowship Award, which grants $25,000 to a Maine artist working in the visual arts and is paired with a solo exhibition at CMCA.

Johnson’s research-driven video installations blend documentary, experimental and narrative filmmaking devices to examine the ways in which individual lives and sociopolitical realities merge. Comprised of footage of site-specific performances, the videos explore how power structures are communicated through relationships, focusing on histories of nationalism and place.

“Unnamed for Decades” is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in Maine and presents a series of new site-specific installations that incorporate videos, sculptures and photographs. These works explore the artist’s ongoing interest in the complexity of collectivity, the wide-ranging consequences of scientific research, as well as dissidence, desire and the queer body.

The public is invited to join the event on Zoom or view live on CMCA’s Facebook page. CMCA associate curator Bethany Engstrom will offer a live video view of the exhibition, and Johnson will discuss her research and work. Donna McNeil, director of the Ellis-Beauregard Foundation and Ellen Tani, A.W. Mellon postdoctoral fellow at the National Gallery’s Center for Advanced Studies in the Visual Arts will also make remarks.

To register for the Zoom event, visit www.cmcanow.org/event/virtual-opening-erin-johnson-unnamed-for-decades.

A 360-degree virtual tour of the exhibition along with Johnson’s video works can be viewed beginning June 6 on the CMCA website at www.cmcanow.org/event/erin-johnson.

May ArtLab to be Live Streamed

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art in Rockland, will host its monthly ArtLab for All Ages workshop via Facebook Live while its doors are closed to the public in response to CDC guidelines on COVID-19.

Artists of all ages are invited to join ArtLab educators Mia Bogyo and Alexis Iammarino for the second livestream workshop at facebook.com/cmcanow from 2 to 3 p.m. May 2.

Following the workshop, participants are encouraged to share their work in a community show and tell via Zoom at 3:45 p.m. Email Mia Bogyo at mbogyo@cmcanow.org for the link to the Zoom call.

The May workshop takes its theme from the work of artist and poet Erin Dorney, whose video poem series “Question the Body” can be viewed in advance of the workshop at www.cmcanow.org. Taking inspiration from Dorney’s assemblages of words and found materials, participants will make their own altered and collaged narrative images. A list of materials to be used in the workshop will be posted to CMCA’s Facebook page and website.

Cove Street Arts Presents a Curatorial Tour of ‘Portland 2020’

Please join curator, Bruce Brown, in an informative walk through of the exhibition, Portland 2020 on Thursday, March 12 at 6pm. Portland 2020 is our attempt to capture our vibrant, evolving city at this moment in time. It is an open juried photography exhibition curated by Bruce Brown, Curator Emeritus of the Center for Maine Contemporary Art, featuring the work of 60 artists. Every photograph in the show was taken since 2017, and within the city limits. Portland, long noted for its rich and vital history, is developing a diverse and dynamic future and is thus the perfect subject to explore as we celebrate Maine’s bicentennial.

The University of Maine Museum of Art announces: PATTERNS IN NATURE: ART & SCIENCE PERSPECTIVES

The University of Maine Museum of Art announces:

PATTERNS IN NATURE: ART & SCIENCE PERSPECTIVES

A panel discussion

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11 – 6-8 PM

Free and open to the public. RSVP required.

Please join UMMA for a panel discussion on patterns found in nature. Featured artist Deirdre Murphy will participate to discuss themes in her work that explore the connection between climate change and migratory bird patterns. Panelists include: Amber Roth, Assistant Professor of Forest Wildlife Management and Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Conservation Biology; Dr. Erik J. Blomberg, Associate Professor of Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Conservation Biology; Dr. Adrienne Leppold, Project Director of Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife; and George Jacobson, Professor Emeritus of Biology, Ecology, & Climate Change, will lend their perspectives on the subject through the lens of their research in the area of conservation biology and climate change. Deirdre Murphy’s exhibition Oculus with artist Scott White will be on display at UMMA through May 2.

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and RSVP required. Please contact Kathryn Jovanelli at 207.581.3370 or email kathrynj@maine.edu to reserve your seat today.

Sunday Salon with artists featured in ‘Temporality’

Sunday Salon | Temporality

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA), in Rockland invites the public to attend the second in a series of Sunday Salon gallery talks related to the exhibition “Temporality: The Process of Time,” on January 5 at 3pm. Presenters will include exhibiting artists Caleb Charland, Clint Fulkerson, and Kate Russo. Each artist will share images and discuss how they use time as a material in their work. 

Exploring ideas of repetition, duration, and process, the exhibition “Temporality | The Process of Time,” looks at how contemporary artists are using time as a means of making. The exhibition explores the question of what is time, and how do we measure and give value to it? One certainty is that artists need time to make their work and viewers need time to look. In a society that’s constantly on the move, the artists included in the exhibition are asking the viewer to slow down and consider the relevance of time as material. 

Caleb Charland (Brewer, ME) uses the photographic process to question visual possibilities within the natural laws of the world. His practice is based in wonder, a state of mind somewhere between knowledge and uncertainty.

Clint Fulkerson (Portland, ME) creates drawings that are the result of contemplating the relationships between space, time, matter, and energy. His murals are created using pre-determined limitations and visual analogies.

Kate Russo (Portland, ME) explores the use of color as narrative in her paintings. She borrows the color palettes of well-known, historical artists in an effort to convey an artist’s character through color.

Marilyn Moss Rockefeller Lobby Installation view

Sunday Salons are free to CMCA members, others with admission. Participants are encouraged to stay following the talk for refreshments and further discussion. The next Sunday Salon in the series will take place on January 26, 2020. For more information, please visit cmcanow.org.

Jane Dahmen “Talking Art in Maine” with Michel Droge

Join host and artist Jane Dahmen in conversation with Portland Art Gallery artist Michel Droge Wednesday, Nov. 6, 7-8:30 at Lincoln Theater in Damariscotta.

Talking Art in Maine with host Jane Dahmen

Michel is a painter, printmaker and educator whose work engages with the environment and the human condition.  Extensive scientific research is behind all the paintings but Michel’s intention is to make sublimely beautiful paintings that draw the viewer in. Michel finds poetry and meaning in scientific and material realities. This event is free and open to the public.

An excerpt from Dan Kany’s review:  “Michel Droge’s “When Cupid Went Crazy” is a very large and colorfully atmospheric canvas. Droge has included some of her Marshall Islands stick chart imagery – which ostensibly turns the image from a view to the sky to a view down to the water. (Stick charts were a form of navigation device that laid out how the presence of the islands interrupted the ocean swells.) But Droge’s works hold up primarily as abstract painting. Their opticality and bubbly visuality are spatial and so turn Droge’s colors into light. Working on this scale is good for Droge: Her work holds up extremely well. It manages to be simultaneously playful and elegant.”

The Sohn’s Gallery Presents Works by Jon Taner

The Sohns Gallery, located in The Rock & Art Shop at 36 Central Street in Bangor, presents Collage Works by Jon Taner . 

Jon Taner recently moved back to the area to be part of the Bangor art scene. He was born and raised in New Jersey. His studied at the Art Students League in New York City. He obtained his Bachelor of Fine Arts from California College of the Arts and his Master of Fine Arts from Syracuse University where he was awarded a Ford Foundation Grant.

When describing his works Taner says “I have used shape, color and scale to create a sense of things both strange and familiar; to flavor the known with the unknown; and give to the viewer a sense of discovery amid scenes and objects. This intriguing ambiguity for the viewer is a result of their memory, abstraction of the natural world, surrealist images, and the melding of all these things into a subjective interpretation. Painting is as much an act of discovery for me as it is for the viewer. The fulfillment from the act of creating both individual and collective works of art is more satisfying the less predictable my paths, and more surprising my destinations.”  Jon Taner’s works are a true delight to the eye and a must see in person. 

The show runs through Oct. 5th and can be viewed any day between 10am and 6pm in The Rock & Art Shop. A closing reception will be held on October 4th at 6:30, Artist Talk at 7.

Colin Page artist talk at Greenhut

Colin Page Behind Fish Beach, oil on canvas, 24 x 36 inches

 

Please join us!
 Saturday, Sept. 21 at 1pm
Colin will talk about the work from his current solo exhibition “Color Notes”
Exhibition continues through September 28
Event is free and open to the public
Please note, seating is limited, first come, first served
 
In September, Greenhut is pleased to present Color Notes, an exhibition of new oil paintings by one of Maine’s most masterful, and most popular, plein air artists, Colin Page. As Press Herald art critic, Daniel Kany puts it, “Page is a leading light of what is called ‘Maine painting’ — that striking, quick and largely improvisational style of observational painting that ranges from Winslow Homer to Don Stone; Maine painting blends a bold brush with atmospheric light and an ever-present sense of place.” Colin shares a bit about his personal process and inspiration in his artist statement below:
The spark of an interesting color or light sensation inspires me to start a painting. A color relationship can create a mood, describe a time of day, give depth to a flat canvas, and emulate a vibration or glow. With this series, I begin each painting with a specific color idea: a harmonious color key or a discordant contrasting key. The paintings are not exact replicas of a scene, but instead are driven by the mood and story I can tell with color and brushwork.
 
This creative use of color is sometimes described in musical terms. Color notes are individual moments that sing when placed in relation to one another. When there is an overall color scheme to a painting, it forms a harmony that can be felt in a way similar to a musical key in a song. A color can be read as discordant but still be the right note. Colors can work together to create the equivalent uplift of a major chord, or the slight sad turn of a minor. A painting is not a copy of nature, but a composition that describes a feeling.      
 
Color is just one tool of communication that I use, but the power and depth of this expression directs my decisions when I consider what to paint, and why.
 
Colin Page was raised in Baltimore, Maryland and studied painting at the Rhode Island School of Design and at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. Whether working on location or in the studio, Colin strives to capture the atmosphere and light of a scene. Colin currently lives in Maine, where he focuses on painting the landscape, and scenes that show his life as a father of two young girls. His work has been featured in solo exhibitions and group shows nationally and abroad

 

Sunday Salon with Tectonic Industries at CMCA

Sunday Salon | Tectonic Industries

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA), in Rockland invites the public to attend a Sunday Salon gallery talk on September 22 at 3pm with exhibiting artists Lars Boye Jerlach and Helen Stringfellow of Tectonic Industries. The artist duo will share the inspirations and process behind their interactive installation, “Dreams Can Come True (if it’s not working for you, you’re not doing it right).”

Danish artist Lars Boye Jerlach and British artist Helen Stringfellow met while pursuing MFA degrees in sculpture at Edinburgh College of Art in Edinburgh, Scotland. Recognizing overlaps in ideals and approaches to art making, they began collaborating in 1999. They moved from Europe to the United States in 2001, and were based in Minneapolis for eleven years. After living in Auckland, New Zealand for sixteen months, they moved back to the U.S. in January 2014 and now live and work in Portland, ME.

DREAMS CAN COME TRUE installation view

Presenting their work as Tectonic Industries, they have exhibited widely in the United States, Europe, and the Pacific. Their work often examines the artifice inherent with the creation of the modern myths and belief systems of popular culture. Balancing wry humor with philosophical reflection, their installation “Dreams Can Come True” examines the impossibility of our collective, endless search for concrete answers and endeavor of self-improvement. 

Sunday Salons are free to CMCA members, others with admission. Participants are encouraged to stay following the talk for refreshments and further discussion. For more information, please visit cmcanow.org.