Archive for Art Talk

Jane Dahmen “Talking Art in Maine” with Michel Droge

Join host and artist Jane Dahmen in conversation with Portland Art Gallery artist Michel Droge Wednesday, Nov. 6, 7-8:30 at Lincoln Theater in Damariscotta.

Talking Art in Maine with host Jane Dahmen

Michel is a painter, printmaker and educator whose work engages with the environment and the human condition.  Extensive scientific research is behind all the paintings but Michel’s intention is to make sublimely beautiful paintings that draw the viewer in. Michel finds poetry and meaning in scientific and material realities. This event is free and open to the public.

An excerpt from Dan Kany’s review:  “Michel Droge’s “When Cupid Went Crazy” is a very large and colorfully atmospheric canvas. Droge has included some of her Marshall Islands stick chart imagery – which ostensibly turns the image from a view to the sky to a view down to the water. (Stick charts were a form of navigation device that laid out how the presence of the islands interrupted the ocean swells.) But Droge’s works hold up primarily as abstract painting. Their opticality and bubbly visuality are spatial and so turn Droge’s colors into light. Working on this scale is good for Droge: Her work holds up extremely well. It manages to be simultaneously playful and elegant.”

The Sohn’s Gallery Presents Works by Jon Taner

The Sohns Gallery, located in The Rock & Art Shop at 36 Central Street in Bangor, presents Collage Works by Jon Taner . 

Jon Taner recently moved back to the area to be part of the Bangor art scene. He was born and raised in New Jersey. His studied at the Art Students League in New York City. He obtained his Bachelor of Fine Arts from California College of the Arts and his Master of Fine Arts from Syracuse University where he was awarded a Ford Foundation Grant.

When describing his works Taner says “I have used shape, color and scale to create a sense of things both strange and familiar; to flavor the known with the unknown; and give to the viewer a sense of discovery amid scenes and objects. This intriguing ambiguity for the viewer is a result of their memory, abstraction of the natural world, surrealist images, and the melding of all these things into a subjective interpretation. Painting is as much an act of discovery for me as it is for the viewer. The fulfillment from the act of creating both individual and collective works of art is more satisfying the less predictable my paths, and more surprising my destinations.”  Jon Taner’s works are a true delight to the eye and a must see in person. 

The show runs through Oct. 5th and can be viewed any day between 10am and 6pm in The Rock & Art Shop. A closing reception will be held on October 4th at 6:30, Artist Talk at 7.

Colin Page artist talk at Greenhut

Colin Page Behind Fish Beach, oil on canvas, 24 x 36 inches

 

Please join us!
 Saturday, Sept. 21 at 1pm
Colin will talk about the work from his current solo exhibition “Color Notes”
Exhibition continues through September 28
Event is free and open to the public
Please note, seating is limited, first come, first served
 
In September, Greenhut is pleased to present Color Notes, an exhibition of new oil paintings by one of Maine’s most masterful, and most popular, plein air artists, Colin Page. As Press Herald art critic, Daniel Kany puts it, “Page is a leading light of what is called ‘Maine painting’ — that striking, quick and largely improvisational style of observational painting that ranges from Winslow Homer to Don Stone; Maine painting blends a bold brush with atmospheric light and an ever-present sense of place.” Colin shares a bit about his personal process and inspiration in his artist statement below:
The spark of an interesting color or light sensation inspires me to start a painting. A color relationship can create a mood, describe a time of day, give depth to a flat canvas, and emulate a vibration or glow. With this series, I begin each painting with a specific color idea: a harmonious color key or a discordant contrasting key. The paintings are not exact replicas of a scene, but instead are driven by the mood and story I can tell with color and brushwork.
 
This creative use of color is sometimes described in musical terms. Color notes are individual moments that sing when placed in relation to one another. When there is an overall color scheme to a painting, it forms a harmony that can be felt in a way similar to a musical key in a song. A color can be read as discordant but still be the right note. Colors can work together to create the equivalent uplift of a major chord, or the slight sad turn of a minor. A painting is not a copy of nature, but a composition that describes a feeling.      
 
Color is just one tool of communication that I use, but the power and depth of this expression directs my decisions when I consider what to paint, and why.
 
Colin Page was raised in Baltimore, Maryland and studied painting at the Rhode Island School of Design and at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. Whether working on location or in the studio, Colin strives to capture the atmosphere and light of a scene. Colin currently lives in Maine, where he focuses on painting the landscape, and scenes that show his life as a father of two young girls. His work has been featured in solo exhibitions and group shows nationally and abroad

 

Sunday Salon with Tectonic Industries at CMCA

Sunday Salon | Tectonic Industries

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA), in Rockland invites the public to attend a Sunday Salon gallery talk on September 22 at 3pm with exhibiting artists Lars Boye Jerlach and Helen Stringfellow of Tectonic Industries. The artist duo will share the inspirations and process behind their interactive installation, “Dreams Can Come True (if it’s not working for you, you’re not doing it right).”

Danish artist Lars Boye Jerlach and British artist Helen Stringfellow met while pursuing MFA degrees in sculpture at Edinburgh College of Art in Edinburgh, Scotland. Recognizing overlaps in ideals and approaches to art making, they began collaborating in 1999. They moved from Europe to the United States in 2001, and were based in Minneapolis for eleven years. After living in Auckland, New Zealand for sixteen months, they moved back to the U.S. in January 2014 and now live and work in Portland, ME.

DREAMS CAN COME TRUE installation view

Presenting their work as Tectonic Industries, they have exhibited widely in the United States, Europe, and the Pacific. Their work often examines the artifice inherent with the creation of the modern myths and belief systems of popular culture. Balancing wry humor with philosophical reflection, their installation “Dreams Can Come True” examines the impossibility of our collective, endless search for concrete answers and endeavor of self-improvement. 

Sunday Salons are free to CMCA members, others with admission. Participants are encouraged to stay following the talk for refreshments and further discussion. For more information, please visit cmcanow.org.

The UMaine Museum of Art’s presents Artist & Curator: Collaboration in Contemporary Art

NINA JEROME (American, born 1950) Entangled Spring, 2019 Oil on linen Courtesy of the artist

The UMaine Museum of Art’s presents

Studio Visit

Artist & Curator: Collaboration in Contemporary Art

WEDNESDAY, September 25th, 2019 at 40 Harlow Street in Bangor

5:30 – 6 PM : wine and cheese reception

6:00 – 7 PM: Panel discussion featuring

Jaime DeSimone, Associate Curator of Contemporary Art, Portland Museum of Art

Alfredo Gisholt, Artist and Associate Professor of Art, Brandeis University

Nina Jerome, Artist and Retired Professor of Art, University of Maine

George Kinghorn, Director and Curator, UMaine Museum of Art

How do museums and curators propel the careers of artists? How do studio visits inform the curatorial process? How does the collaborative relationship between curator and artist influence the final exhibition? Join us for this lively panel discussion featuring four voices in contemporary art.

This event is FREE, however, seating is limited. First come, first serve. RSVP required by calling 207-581-3370 or email kathrynj@maine.edu

Cynthia Winings Gallery presents A Conversation with Artist Jenny Brillhart

Jenny Brillhart, Pink House On Route 3, Oil on aluminum

Cynthia Winings Gallery presents A Conversation with Artist Jenny Brillhart, for the First Friday Blue Hill. Join in for casual conversation in the gallery about inspiration, process, and the current show. Talk starts at 5:30 and the gallery is open late. Refreshments provided and everyone is welcome.

Greenhut Galleries Presents “Color Notes”

Behind Fish Beach, oil on canvas, 24 x 36 inches

Greenhut, on September 5-28th is pleased to present Color Notes, an exhibition of new oil paintings by one of Maine’s most masterful, and most popular, plein air artists, Colin Page. Greenhut is located in Portland and an opening reception will be held on September 5 from 5-7pm and an Artist Talk on September 21 at 1pm. As Press Herald art critic, Daniel Kany puts it, “Page is a leading light of what is called ‘Maine painting’ — that striking, quick and largely improvisational style of observational painting that ranges from Winslow Homer to Don Stone; Maine painting blends a bold brush with atmospheric light and an ever-present sense of place.” Colin shares a bit about his personal process and inspiration in his artist statement below: 

The spark of an interesting color or light sensation inspires me to start a painting. A color relationship can create a mood, describe a time of day, give depth to a flat canvas, and emulate a vibration or glow. With this series, I begin each painting with a specific color idea: a harmonious color key or a discordant contrasting key. The paintings are not exact replicas of a scene, but instead are driven by the mood and story I can tell with color and brushwork.

This creative use of color is sometimes described in musical terms. Color notes are individual moments that sing when placed in relation to one another. When there is an overall color scheme to a painting, it forms a harmony that can be felt in a way similar to a musical key in a song. A color can be read as discordant but still be the right note. Colors can work together to create the equivalent uplift of a major chord, or the slight sad turn of a minor. A painting is not a copy of nature, but a composition that describes a feeling.  

Color is just one tool of communication that I use, but the power and depth of this expression directs my decisions when I consider what to paint, and why.

Colin Page was raised in Baltimore, Maryland and studied painting at the Rhode Island School of Design and at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. Whether working on location or in the studio, Colin strives to capture the atmosphere and light of a scene. Colin currently lives in Maine, where he focuses on painting the landscape, and scenes that show his life as a father of two young girls. His work has been featured in solo exhibitions and group shows nationally and abroad

2 Blue, painted wooden construction, 11×15 inches

Our September side gallery show will feature new work by artist, Zen master, and former Monhegan Island resident Mike Stiler. Stiler’s love of working with recycled material is a sort of meditation for the artist that brings humor and light to the world, a direct reflection of his search for inner Zen and his background teaching Buddhism. He describes himself as “basically a cartoonist who works with wood, copper, paint, nails, steel, aluminum, leather, rubber, plastic, stone, graphite, watercolor, charcoal, ink, linoleum block, glitter, silicone, found objects, junk, photographs, ball point pen, words, ideas and empty space.” Mike describes his practice and his inspiration as follows: 

Everything I do and everything I make comes out of the question, ‘Who am I?’ This question is fundamental to the realization of anything that deserves to be called art. It is my deepest longing to make art that is funny, serious, scary, humble, confused, light, heavy, deep, shallow, clumsy, elegant, common, colossal, abstract, figurative, narrative and enlivening. I wish to, in any way I can, carry on the tradition of my heroes, Louis Armstrong, Agnes Martin, Vincent VanGogh, Pierre Bonnard, Walt Whitman, Bob Dylan, Claes Oldenburg, Andy Warhol, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, J.S. Bach, Alice Neel, Blackie Langlais, Huang Po,Ta Hui, Dogen, Joshu, Bankei, Beethoven, Robert Crumb and anyone else committed to finding the smallest in the biggest and the biggest in the smallest.

Mike Stiler attended Syracuse University School of Fine Arts for sculpture and Rochester Institute of Technology for painting. His work is in collections at the School of American Craftsman in Rochester and the Everson Museum of Art in Syracuse, New York.

David Driskell : A Life in Art, Gardening and Material Culture at CMCA

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA) in partnership with Indigo Arts Alliance of Portland, invites the public to attend a slide presentation and conversation with renowned artist David Driskell at CMCA, 21 Winter Street, Rockland, on Sunday, September 8 at 4pm.

The illustrated talk, “A Life in Art, Gardening and Material Culture” centers on three of Driskell’s favorite things. One of the most eminent artists of our times, Driskell will be accompanied in conversation with artist and cultural anthropologist Dr. Myron Beasley of Bates College, Lewiston. Tickets to the event are $8 CMCA members; $10 non-members, and may be purchased online at cmcanow.org. Advance tickets are recommended as seating is limited. All proceeds from the event support CMCA and Indigo Arts Alliance.

Highly regarded as an artist, scholar and curator, David Driskell is one of the world’s leading authorities on African-American art. He has been the recipient of thirteen honorary doctorates and has contributed significantly to scholarship in the history of art on the role of African-American artists in America. His paintings and collages reflect his person vision and memory. Marked by the artist’s abiding color sensibilities, his work bears the imprint of a turbulent era, a return to nature, and Driskell’s synthesis of the European, American, and African art forms he knew firsthand.

For additional information about the event, contact CMCA at info@cmcanow.org or call 207-701-5005.

Location: 21 Winter Street, Rockland, Maine. Hours: June through October, Monday – Saturday, 10am to 5pm, Sunday, 12 to 5pm. Closed Federal holidays. Admission: $8; Seniors (65+) and students with ID $6; children under 18 free; CMCA members free.www.cmcanow.org

Courthouse Gallery hosts “Meaning in Layers”

Charlie Hewitt and Daniel Kany

 

Courthouse Gallery will host “Meaning in Layers” on Wednesday, August 28 at 5:30pm. Artist Charlie Hewitt and art critic Daniel Kany will talk about Hewitt’s work and the strategies behind making art, and how the creative process, technique, and cultural meaning come together in contemporary art. A solo show of Hewitt’s large-scale abstract paintings and neon constructions are on view at the gallery through September. The talk is free and open to the public.

Courthouse Gallery is located at 6 Court Street in Ellsworth. For gallery hours and more information on upcoming shows call (207) 667-6611, or visit courthousegallery.com.

Charlie Hewitt is a nationally known Maine-born painter, printmaker, and sculptor. Hewitt grew up in a large working-class French Canadian family in the mill-working communities of Lewiston/Auburn and Brunswick, Maine. Home was a place of family, love, and faith. Life revolved around church and work, and the energetic culture of these mill-working communities became the foundation for his imagery and symbols. Hewitt’s work is in numerous private and public collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY; Whitney Museum of American Art, NY; Museum of Modern Art, NY; Library of Congress, Washington, DC; and in Maine at the Portland Museum of Art, Farnsworth Museum of Art, and in the art museums at Bates, Bowdoin, and Colby colleges. Hewitt lives in Yarmouth, Maine.

Daniel Kany is an art historian, art critic, and freelance writer. More than 420 of Kany’s art criticism columns have appeared in the Maine Sunday Telegram and Portland Press Herald, and he has authored dozens of catalogs, publications, and magazine articles about art and artists. Kany serves on the editorial board of the Maine Arts Journal: The UMVA Quarterly and is an adjunct at the New Hampshire Institute of Art. He has won multiple awards from the Maine Press Association for his art criticism. Kany studied at Bowdoin College and then at Johns Hopkins University under Michael Fried and Yves-Alain Bois. An experienced curator, Kany has been a director of the Center on Contemporary Art in Seattle, Friesen Gallery, William Traver Gallery, and the Daniel Kany Gallery. Kany lives in Cumberland, Maine.

Tuesday Talk with Ann Craven and Christopher Crosman at CMCA

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA), located at 21 Winter Street in Rockland, invites the public to attend a Tuesday Talk with artist Ann Craven and Christopher B. Crosman, founding curator, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art and former director, Farnsworth Art Museum, on Tuesday, August 27 at 5:30pm. The talk will address Craven’s work currently on view in the exhibition, “Birds We Know.” Crosman contributed an essay on Craven’s career to the forthcoming exhibition catalog to be published by CMCA and distributed by D.A.P. 

Ann Craven has been painting in Maine since the early 1990s. First in a borrowed barn near Slab City Road in Lincolnville, then from her own studio on a farm she purchased nearby. Lincolnville and the surrounding mid-coast region has harbored artists for decades, beginning in the 1960s when Neil Welliver, Alex Katz, Lois Dodd, and other New York-based artists began summering in the area. It was on Lincolnville beach that Craven painted her first “Moon” painting in 1995. The experience “gave me my subject matter,” she says. “I was literally chasing the moon.” In 2008, she moved to an historic house on the banks of the St. George River in Cushing. “Birds We Know” is the artist’s first exhibition in Maine and presents a twenty-year survey of her work.

 

Birds We Know installation view. Photo: Dave Clough

In the exhibition catalog, Crosman writes, “…Ann Craven’s birds, moons, trees, and her stripe and palette paintings all enforce the hard stop our mind and eye make before inexplicable paintings, paintings that affirm an inseparability of beauty, truth and virtue. This is painting at its most authentic and original, at its most memorable and tenderly remarkable.” 

Tuesday Talks are free to CMCA members, others with admission. Participants are encouraged to stay following the talk for refreshments and further discussion. For further information, please visit cmcanow.org.