Archive for Artists Reception

Sohns Gallery Solo Exhibit “Oh You Pretty Things” by Kat Johnson

 

The Sohns Gallery at The Rock & Art Shop in Bangor announces a solo exhibition by local artist Kat Johnson, Oh You Pretty Things. The exhibit runs March 4 – April 28, with an opening reception Friday, March 8 at 6:30 pm. The artist will be on site to give remarks at 7:30. This event is free and open to the public.

Oh You Pretty Things will include all new works created in the past six months. The exhibition will showcase eight new large relief prints. These framed works will be for sale along with the unframed prints in the edition and other smaller prints of various subjects. The artist will be donating a portion of all sales made during the duration of the show to Mabel Wadsworth Center.

Johnson has lived and worked in Bangor for over fifteen years and this is her fourth solo show in the area and second at the Sohns Gallery. Johnson works as the Senior Museum Educator and Marketing Manager at the University of Maine Museum of Art in Downtown Bangor. She received her Masters of Fine Art in Intermedia in 2012 from the University of Maine and has been an active member of the creative community since her arrival in Maine in 2003.

This is the second exhibition of Johnson’s work at the Sohns Gallery. The first showing was a large scale evolving painting which was the inaugural show in the gallery. Having focused on painting for many years, Johnson has now turned to printmaking to create her images. Regarding this shift Johnson stated, “I’ve always painted large, flat areas of color with bold line work, very much in the style of a screen print or relief print. I thought it was time I finally made that leap to fully delve into the process of printmaking.”

Connie Hayes, ‘Face Time’ at Dowling Walsh Gallery

 

Please join us for the culmination of our community fundraising project on Saturday, March 2nd from 3-5pm.  Additional donations will be accepted during the event.

March Exhibitions at Greenhut Galleries

Tim Christensen, Tunk Stream Blackwoods Porcelain 14 x 6 x 6 inches

These exhibitions are shown from March 7 – 30 with an opening reception on March 7 from 5-7.  Tim Christensen will give a talk on March 9 at 1 and Henry Isaacs on March 16 at 1.
Greenhut is pleased to announce its first exhibition of work by printmaker, PMA Biennial featured porcelain artist, environmentalist, and writer, Tim Christensen. The exhibition is titled, “In Response to Chaos” and the work featured in this show is the culmination of his latest sea voyage.
When I googled “Container Ship Passage Australia” 2-1/2 years ago, it was with the intention that I would create a body of work that would chronicle an odyssey. I had been asked to present my pecha kucha talk, “Art in the Holocene Extinction” in Cooroy, Queensland, and from this invitation, I created a “mega-transect,” a study of the Earth’s systems that would come to span the major oceans, 6 of the 7 continents, and take me around the world using about 5 gallons of crude oil. I would experience the heat of the Sudanese Red Sea, the wet of the Bornean Jungle, the loneliness of the Pacific, the space of the Australian bush, and the chaos of living in places where everything is unfamiliar and new. I would experience hurricanes, typhoons, pirates, state security services, dingos, snakes, insects, flying fish, whales, sharks, sea snakes, macaques, leeches, superstition, inescapable reality, and plastic. I would see rare birds, rare sea creatures, rare atmospheric events, rare primates, and catch rare glimpses into lives- foreign and internal. In setting out to experience the world’s most remote places, I committed to recording my experiences in as many durable, tangible, and recognizable ways I could think of.
I had two rules for this project: “Make everything possible as new as possible,” and “Always say, ’Yes.’” The resulting work reflects my observations of subjects internal and external. I looked at everything as equally valid and important, from traditional math- based-scientific data to more abstractly emotional and philosophical ideas.
I have used infinitely durable porcelain and universal visual language (Art!), to communicate what I saw across time, language, culture, and geographic barriers. These artifacts are designed to last tens of thousands of years and be accessible to anyone or anything with an eyeball and the ability to think abstractly. I conveyed the intimate daily experiences of the first voyage in that most personal of ways: by writing a book. Reflect, Adapt, and Persevere, co-written by Carri Lange and bound by Anna Low, was made using archival paper and inks, a self-created font of my handwriting, original drawings and intaglio prints, and a combination of ancient and modern silk screen printing processes and materials. During my travels, I used durable and portable etching plates and ancient drypoint to record my environment, often en plein air, capturing each day’s most compelling event, and later learned intaglio printing to create multiple images of what I saw. In all cases, I have “shown my work”, allowing the growth in the way I express myself to be evident alongside that which I was expressing.
Tim Christensen lives in Maine, splitting his time between Franklin and Roque Bluffs.

Henry Isaacs, Budapest Street 7 x 5 inches, Oil on panel

 

In the side gallery this month, Greenhut presents another travel-themed exhibition: Travel Notes, small paintings by Henry Isaacs. Writer and art critic, Dan Kany, has authored a booklet to accompany the show. An excerpt from Henry’s introduction to the Travel Notes booklet:
Sicily, Spring 2014. I am sitting in a cafe in front of Il Duomo di Cefalù on a Sunday morning. It is a quiet, sunny place. The vast space is empty. My palettes and brushes are set. My first sketch is exciting, and so I set to work. It was a Sunday, and after mass the children were the first out, and some ran over to me, curious to see what I was doing. Soon enough, there was a bunch of people around me. The waiter was happy because there was much more business. I worked very slowly because I was really comfortable, and I had plenty of time since Donna was off shopping. I heard one man say to the kids, ‘He seems nice. Go. Ask him about the colors. Why is he using those colors?’ ‘Lui sembra simpati-co. Vai.’ They did. I teased the children: ‘Do you have a problem with my colors?’ ‘No, sir! Grandfather. Where do you get those colors?’ ‘These are the best colors in the world,’ I replied in my broken Italian, ’Where do you think I get them?’ After a bit of back and forth about the best colors in the world, I said — finally — ‘Sicilia!’ They all cheered and the drinks came out, including an herb liqueur that was foul and tasted like 250% alcohol. They cheered again when I raised my glass and said, ‘Here’s to the colors of Sicilia!’ and we all toasted.
This story has repeated itself around the world so often that I am surprised when some version of it doesn’t happen. Painting on the tea terraces of Rwanda, women stop and watch from a respectful distance, and though I speak no Kinyarwanda, there is a smile, an exchange, a question, a brush tried out. Mayan children gather in highland villages in Guatemala and teach me the names of colors in K’iche’. In a small yurt in the mountains of central Japan, I work alongside my ninety-year-old Japanese friend while he paints his long scrolls. Near Black Mountain, Maine, I sit for the day painting small panels in August. Friends, family, and strangers join me for minutes or hours painting for the first or the umpteenth time as we chat away on the most splendid of days.
So many of my paintings have such records of companionship and stories embedded in them. I don’t necessarily remember all the details when I bring them back to my studio, but I remember enough. Art for me has never been a private undertaking. I mean it to be shared. My story of Sicily could just as easily have taken place on the Eastern Prom in Portland, Maine….
I hope the work and I always remain sembra simpatico.
Henry Isaacs received his BFA in Painting from the Rhode Island School of Design and his MFA in Printmaking from the Slade School of Fine Art in England. He has taught and lectured around the world and his work is in numerous public and private collections. When not traveling the world, Henry splits his time between Portland and Vermont.

Tidemark Gallery Show: The Word Made Art

Tidemark Gallery + Café is pleased to present “The Word Made Art,” a group art exhibition to mark this year’s celebration of Herman Melville’s 200th birthday with works inspired by the the American Renaissance (1820-1860). Participating visual artists offer, in their chosen media, responses to literary works of men and women from the seminal era of American Romanticism: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Edger Allen Poe, Emily Dickinson, and others.

The artists featured in the show will include: Chris Augusta, Barbara Vanderbilt, David Peloquin, Sandy Griffin, Linda Gallion, Stephanie Muri, Susanna Lasker, Pat Parks, Lucy Martin, Stephanie Chamberlin, Alana VanDerwerker, Martha Truscott, and Helen Richmond Webb.

“The Word Made Art” will run through the first week in May, 2019. The artists will be present at the opening reception Sunday, March 2nd from 2 – 5 p.m. Gallery hours are 10-5, Wednesday through Friday, and 10-2 Saturdays. For additional information please find us on Facebook or at 902 Main Street, Waldoboro, 207 832-5109.

It’s A Black And White Affair at Markings Gallery

Jo Diggs

 

 Artists have worked in black and white since someone first put ink to paper. The concept is a simple choice between things that are clearly opposites. Through the ages to today, black and white is used in many art forms including wood block prints, photography, charcoal and ink drawing and print making to name but a few.

 

Passion by Barbara Burns

 

Pablo Picasso’s,  Guernica (1937) painted in black, white, and grays remains one of the most moving and powerful antiwar paintings in history. Picasso does not want us to passively look, but to imagine this terrible moment from the inside. Colors let us off lightly; black and white forces us to think without the distraction of color.

Working in black and white makes the artist and the viewer concentrate on elements such as composition, value, lighting and form. Of course, color is a vital step, but the benefit of black and white is that you can focus on the image as a whole without the distraction of color. In fashion, black and white is considered sophisticated.  It is the easiest and the most timeless color pairing. Interesting silhouettes and textures are easily achieved as an enhancement.
Markings Gallery in Bath has created a black and white exhibit which highlights the work of many of their artists. Marianne Senechal’s black and white felted shawl is a stunning example of black and white in fashion along with Kirsten Sandoy’s beautiful felted hats. Jo Diggs’ hand appliqué work is remarkable in its skill and composition. Barbara Burns’ tapestries are wonderful examples of the power of black and white in art, expressing the feminine and Susan Mills’ shamanic, felted works are inspired by nature, by the physical world and the world of spirit.
Join us at Markings Gallery February 17, from 12-4 pm  to honor the tradition of working in black and white by viewing our exhibit It’s A Black & White Affair. Barbara Burns will be demonstrating tapestry weaving in back and white. Refreshments will be served and many of our wonderful stable of artists will be there for you to meet.
The gallery is open Thurs- Mon, 10-5.

Man-Made: A State of Nature presented by Greenhut Galleries

Amy Peters Wood, Amelanotic Panhomoteratoma, egg tempera on resin encased panel

 

From February 7 – March 2 Greenhut Galleries is proud to present an environmentally themed invitational show with a focus on the social and cultural aspects of climate change. With point critical for reversing climate change behind us, but mitigation of future effects still possible, we invited 23 activist artists to submit work that creates awareness, stimulates dialogue, explores ethical issues and implications, comments on or seeks to change human behavior towards other species, and encourages long-term respect for the natural systems with which we coexist. The result is an exciting and eclectic exhibition. Media range from oil paintings to photographs to ceramics, textiles, reclaimed fishing gear, encaustic, wood, plastic, raw coal, bee pollen and more. The thread that binds is the thought-provoking beauty of the objects themselves and the passion each artist brought to this important project. We hope you’ll join us in participating in this urgent conversation.

Gin Stone, Atlantic Canyons Coyote, mixed media

 

Opening reception, Saturday, February 9 from 1-3pm. Man-Made featured artists: Judith Allen, Greta Bank, Stephen Burt, Kate Chappell, Lee Cummings, Michel Droge, Rick Green, Sean Alonzo Harris, Joe Hemes, Adriane Herman, Tina Ingraham, Juliet Karelsen, Jonathan Mess, Amy Peters Wood, Ben Potter, Alison Rector, Carter Shappy, Gail Skudera, Gin Stone, Shoshanna White, DM Witman, Jeff Woodbury, Dudley Zopp

The Harlow Presents ‘Commonplace’

 

Maxwell Nolin ‘Burden’

The Harlow presents “Commonplace”, a two-person exhibition featuring work by Nathan Allard of Somerville and Maxwell Nolin of Belfast. The exhibition is on view January 4 – February 9  at 100 Water Street in Hallowell. The public is invited to attend and meet the artists at the opening reception on Friday, January 4, 5-7pm.

Nathan Allard ‘Rachael’

In Commonplace, Allard and Nolin highlight people of New England through portraits and figure paintings represented in oil and egg tempera paint. The exhibition takes a look at the simple, quiet moments in life, and offers a space for contemplation and reflection.

Betts Gallery celebrates annual ‘Holiday Galleria’

 

This December, Betts Gallery celebrates the holidays with their annual ‘Holiday Galleria’ show, joining in on the Belfast Holiday Artwalk with an opening reception, Friday December 7th, 5:30-8pm. The exhibit of local, affordable art, in a variety of media includes works by: Sally Brophy, Jennie Connor, Susan Cooney, Julie Cyr, Kris Engman, Sarah Faragher, Helene Ferrar, Conny Hatch, David Jacobson, Sheep Jones, Mark Kelly, Allegra Kuhn, Kathleen Mack, Leslie Moore, Willy Reddick, Wes Reddick, Betty Schopmeyer, Lesia Sochor, Kay Sullivan, Mary Trotochaud and Peter Walls. Be sure to check in often, as the show, which runs from December 7th through the 22nd, will be changing throughout the month as sold pieces are replaced by new work.

Art for The Holidays at Gleason Fine Art’s

Ed Parker, Happy Holidays, acrylic, 4” double sided ornament

Wouldn’t it be fun to see what career artists could come up with for tree ornaments? That’s the idea behind the centerpiece of Gleason Fine Art’s “Art for the Holidays” show, which begins Thursday, November 29, 2018, and runs through Wednesday, January 2, 2019. A beautiful Christmas tree will be decorated with ornaments made by the gallery’s artists. A celebratory open house, to which everyone is invited, will be held at Gleason Fine Art, 31 Townsend Avenue, from 3 to 6 pm, on Saturday, December 1, to coincide
with Harbor Lights Festival. Refreshments including wine and craft beer will be
served.

Janice Anthony, Canada Lilies, acrylic, 4” double sided ornament

 

Jeff Barrett, Happy Fish, oil painted wood, 4” long fish ornaments

For his ornaments, Southport summer resident Ed Parker has carved and painted two pieces with his characteristic folky nautical themes. Ed’s delightful “Lighthouse Dog” is decked out in his holiday finest. Lani Havens has made a series of gorgeous blocks collaged with delicate red, orange, and pink poppies. Maine realist Janice Anthony has created a tiny double-sided painting of yellow and orange lilies. Folk artist Jeff Barrett’s whimsical carvings have been purchased by collectors ranging from those with surnames like Rockefeller and Marcus (as in Neiman-Marcus) to tourists just back from visiting the Botanical Gardens. For the gallery’s tree, Jeff has netted us an entire school of his “happy fish.” Besides the tree ornaments that are arriving daily, the gallery’s showrooms have been hung with a bounty of seasonal paintings by gallery favorites Mitch and Kathleen Billis, Kevin Beers, and Tom Curry. East Boothbay artist Andrea Peters’ sumptuous snowscapes are a feast of color. East Boothbay summer resident, and newly minted Gleason artist, Don Demers, has given the gallery several new oils, including a little beauty titled “Winter Tide.” Roger Dale Brown, who joined the Gleason roster just this year, is represented by several glowing, snow-covered paintings of Maine coastal villages and harbors. Not interested in paintings? The gallery has so much more: a new batch of George Pearlman’s porcelain jars, vases, and pots in cobalt and emerald green; rings, necklaces, and bracelets by Christine Peters, our former gallery manager who has become a jewelry rock star; and a luscious selection of Moroccan rugs from that indomitable duo, Diana Kerr and Kathleen Jones.

Art at The Grill in Damariscotta

Art at the Grill showcasing works by Sandra Leinonen Dunn, Steve Dunn, Penny Markley, Judy Schuppien and Kim Skillin Traina. Art opening December 5 4-5:30 and is on display from December 4 – January 22.