Archive for Artists Reception

Greenhut Galleries Presents New Works by Ed Douglas

Portrait Thirteen (The Gardener II), oil on linen, 36″ x 28″

 

In May, Greenhut Galleries in Portland, is excited to present a solo exhibition of new works by long-time Greenhut artist, former Maine College of Art drawing and painting instructor and Art Department Chair, Ed Douglas.  There will be an opening reception on Thursday, May 2 5-7 and the show runs from May 2 – June 1.  Well-known poet Maine, Jonathan Aldrich, has written beautifully about his friend’s work:

Ed Douglas is a master of color. Like Matisse, one of his favorite painters, he works until he gets it right. Sometimes we can see where he has thinly, or partially, painted a fresh color over a previous one — part of the long process he adheres to, a process inviting the viewer to realize an intended aspect of the painting. Sometimes we notice an odd patch of color, seemingly discordant until we understand that the created tension in some way balances the whole. Energy and light emerge from his best paintings.We sense this quality even from far away.

Ed is often drawn to series. He has painted purely non-representational designs, but also a great series of primitive standing stones, of graveyards, of quarries, of flowers. For some time now his work has turned to human figures, people busy at their business, or a single person looking out at us, or a nude threesome simply (it seems) standing around — but always more abstract and designed than we might expect.  Although Ed is a very serious artist, his work rarely strikes us as tragic or sad. (The graveyard series may be a kind of exception.) Unlike many abstract expressionists, his view is truly positive and even compassionate. In fact, I find an underlying humor in some of his latest work, subtle and perhaps not striven for. In social life he loves a joke. (I can image a dialogue:  Me: “What’s that strange little patch for?” Ed: “It’s for sale.”)

 

Musicians, Oil on panel, 12″ x 11.5″

 

Thus, while we may be initially attracted to a Douglas painting for its subject matter, this is not the painter’s wish, nor is it our own when we understand what we are looking at. The painting, when completed represents only itself. One viewer once complained, “The arm in that paintings seems too high.” Ed answered, “That’s not an arm. It’s paint.” And he meant it. The painting is the painting, and if it does not represent anything external, it would be the sensation(s) he experienced from something he had seen or imagined, or even the act of creation itself. For Ed, sensations are the key. Let’s just simply say that Ed Douglas’s finest paintings are sensational.

 

The Very Model of a Modern General, 23″ x 22.5″

 

Born in 1935, Ed Douglas began his fine arts education at the Rhode Island School of Design earning a BFA in 1963. He earned an MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute, where he studied with Bay Area giant Richard Diebenkorn. From 1973 to 2000, Douglas taught drawing and painting at the Maine College of Art in Portland, Maine, and for most of his tenure there, he also served as Chair of the Art Department. Douglas has been a Visiting Professor at Washington University in St. Louis, as well as at the Art Academy of Cincinnati, Ohio, and the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada. In 2013, he was an invited guest lecturer and art critic at Colby College. Ed’s work is included in the permanent collections of the Portland Museum of Art, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Dayton Art Museum, Dayton, Ohio, Lincoln Land Community College, Springfield, Illinois, the Cincinnati Art Museum in Cincinnati, Ohio, and the Papendrecht Museum of Contemporary Art, Netherlands, as well as in private collections in the United States, Canada, Spain, Netherlands, and Greece. Ed Douglas maintains a residence in Maine spending summers in Essex, New York.

Maine Craft Portland Nupitals: Adornment for a New Age

Nupitals: Adornment for a New Age

Maine Craft Portland unveils an alternative bridal show not to be missed! Over 20 craft artists have created one-of-a-kind ceremonial adornment, accessories, and jewelry that embody new ideas to present bridal with a twist!

This 2-month long exhibit will showcase unique offerings for the discerning contemporary looking to get hitched in distinctive true to you style. How about matching hand stamped leather belts, lovers’ knot bracelets, or a silk skived unisex Kurta? These dazzling, ready to wear pieces, like all offerings at the Maine Craft Portland retail gallery were handcrafted by talented Maine-based craft artists.

Exhibition Dates: May 3 – June 29th
First Friday Art Walk Receptions
May 3rd, 5-8pm Opening Reception with jazz pianist Sonja Florman
June 7th 5-8pm Musical guest Owen Kennedy from Pineland Fiddlers

The Gallery at Somes Sound and the Myers Family, Wendell Gilley Museum presents an exhibition

Annual Spring Open House & Carving Show
A Trio of Treats!
 
Featuring Member’s Carving Show, 

Master Carver Harold Haertel,
and Artist Paul Rickert’s Susan Abbott Myers Collection 
 
Master Carver Harold Haertel was a contemporary of Wendell Gilley.  An exhibition curated by Mr. Haertel displays his beautifully crafted carvings and decoys.
 
In collaboration with the Gallery at Somes Sound and the Myers Family, Wendell Gilley Museum presents an exhibition of paintings by acclaimed Artist Paul Rickert collected by Susan Abbott Myers (1935-2017).  
Sunday, May 12th  |  12:00 – 4:00 pm
4 Herrick Road, Southwest Harbor

The Caldbeck Gallery Presents Gallery Artists’ “Back to Nature”

PLENTY, 1989, oil on canvas, Nancy Wissemann-Widrig

 

The Caldbeck Gallery, 12 Elm Street in Rockland, will open its 38th summer season on First Friday, May 3, with a group show.  This exhibition enjoys a fun and free interpretation of its title, “Back to Nature”, with paintings, sculpture, drawings, and photographs by gallery artist Anne Alexander, Katherine Bradford, Alan Bray, Lise Becu, Sam Cady, K. Min, David Dewey, Lois Dodd, Melanie Essex, Jeff Epstein, Kathleen Florance, Maggie Foskett, Nancy Glassman, Bayard Hollins, Janice Kasper, Fred Kellogg, Koichiro Kurita, Kristin Malin, Chris Osgood, Elizabeth O’Reilly, Dennis Pinette, Michael Reece, Barbara Sullivan, Todd Watts, Dan West, Susan Williams, and Nancy Wissemann-Widrig.

The reception will take place on First Friday May 3, from 5-8 pm.  The gallery is looking forward to seeing everyone out and about again, and to the kick off of 2019’s “Rockland, Art Capital of Maine” adventures.   “Back to Nature” has been on view for much of the winter, and it will run through May 10.

Spring gallery hours are Tuesday – Friday 12 – 4, and by chance and by appointment. For more information, please call the gallery at 207 594 5935, or email caldbeck@midcoast.com

Landing Gallery presents “2019 SEASON INVITATIONAL EXHIBITION”

“A Distant Fog” oil/canvas, 30” x 40” by Lisa Kyle

 

Landing Gallery, 409 Main St in Rockland opens this Season with the “2019 SEASON INVITATIONAL EXHIBITION.”  The original paintings are based on environmental interaction, celebrating nature and the environment in Maine.  New works by gallery artists; Roberta Baumann, Bruce Busko, Irma Cerese, Sarah Faragher, Christopher French, Brian Krebs, Lisa Kyle, Monique Lazard, David Peterson, Björn Runquist, Michael Weymouth & J.M. Wilde are included in this exhibition.

 

“Afternoon in North Haven” oil/panel, 11” x 14” by Christopher French

The Artists’ Opening Reception will be held on Friday, May 3rd from 5-8 PM during Arts In Rockland’s first Friday art walk for 2019.  Please join us in the gallery for light refreshments. The exhibition will be showing May 3 – May 19.

 

“Water #11/Sunset Wave” oil/panel, 13” x 13” by Brian Krebs

 

 

“Birch Grove, Acadia National Park, Maine” oil/linen, 30” x 40” by Bruce Busko

 

Hours: Wed–Sat 11-5, closed, Sun, Mon & Tue  FMI 207 239-1223

To follow our new work and events, please visit and like us at w.w.w.facebook.com/LandingGallery/

Archipelago Gallery presents “Breaking the Snow, Drying the Mud: Florals by Jean Kigel”

 

 

Hope springs eternal in the human breast.  Archipelago Gallery located at 386 Main St. in Rockland renews that promise with a display of colorful perennials by Waldoboro artist Jean Kigel.  Featured florals include crocus, daffodils, iris and Japanese toad lily.  Reception on First Friday, May 3 the show runs through June 15.  For more information call Archipelago at 596-0701, or visit Kigel’s web site www.jeankigel.com.

Centre St Arts Gallery, LLC features Guest Artist Leslie Woods

Leslie Woods, Advice

 

Centre St Arts Gallery, LLC invites the public to a Wine & Cheese Reception to open the new show featuring Guest Artist Leslie Woods, on Friday, May 10, 2019, from 5 to 7 pm, at 11 Centre Street in Bath.  Admission is free and light refreshments will be served.

Painter Leslie Woods says “I paint figures, because I am passionate about composition, and bodies are my design elements. Muscles are maps of their actions, and bones create patterns. Hands and feet indicate specific activity , and I love to emphasize their lift, fall, and twist.

“People have always been easy for me, so I quickly desired more complexity than the static poses of figure classes. While I can draw and paint portraits, I prefer to apply hats and shadows, because well-done head and body placements convey expression without distractions. I want anyone to see self, relatives, or friends in my work.

“Sport permits my love of brilliant color, which I temper to accommodate my somewhat cubist, color-block style. I enjoy the demanding puzzle-making of color changes based upon light, motion, and my artistic vision.

“All of my paintings require multiple photos, drawings, research into anatomy books, and an understanding of the subject. I want an entire work to present kinetic energy and attitude thru my carefully crafted composition.”

Centre St Arts Gallery, LLC, is artist-owned and operated, open year-round.  Spring hours are Wednesday through Saturday from 10:30 am to 5:00 pm. For more information please call 207-442-0300 or visit the website: centrestartsgalleryllc.com

The Harlow presents “Ian Trask and Andrew Elijah Edwards: HYPERTEXTURE”

Kill Your Television by Ian Trask

The Harlow presents “HYPERTEXTURE”, a two-person art exhibition featuring work by Topsham artists Ian Trask and Andrew Elijah Edwards. The exhibition is on view May 10-June 15, 2019 at 100 Water Street in Hallowell. The public is invited to attend and meet the artists at an opening reception on Friday, May 10, 5-7pm.

Two artists explore the landscape between the physical and the virtual, weaving a dialogue between their personal mediums. Ian Trask creates art out of the forgotten world of the material, recombining discarded bits of society into objects of mystery and reverence. Andrew Elijah Edwards transmutes light through the electronic moving image to explore the imaginal and subjective worlds. In HYPERTEXTURE, the two intertwine their practices, forming an exhibition expressing aesthetics of wild complexity in the meeting between the physical and the virtual, the inner and the external. As these two flows meet they spin off intricate eddies of texture and light. Through a series of personal and collaborative projects ranging from sculptural to video to the combination of the mediums through projection mapping and photogrammetry (in which the virtual is physicalized and the physical virtualized) Hypertexture exhibits a range of works created in dialogue and collaboration.

Objects From The Other Dimension by Andrew Elijah Edwards

The Harlow is a membership based 501(c)3 nonprofit dedicated to connecting and celebrating art, artists and community in downtown historic Hallowell since 1963. Exhibitions are always free and open to the public. Hours are Wednesday-Saturday noon-6pm. For more information please visit harlowgallery.org or call 207-622-3813.

Courthouse Gallery Fine Art opening for “Heath Paley: Photographs of Ellsworth”

Mike’s, dye-sublimation on aluminum, 39.5 x 80 inches

 

Courthouse Gallery Fine Art in Ellsworth is pleased to present a selection of Heath Paley’s high-definition, large-scale photographs of Ellsworth. The show runs from April 24–May 15, 2019. Paley’s prints use a new cutting-edge process called dye-sublimation, which permanently infuses the image onto aluminum. Paley will give at talk about his work at the Gallery on Thursday, May 9 at 6pm, refreshments at 5:30pm. The event is free and open to the public.

 

Elver Weir, dye-sublimation on aluminum, 68.3 x 30.6 inches

 

Paley’s large-scale prints, which are up to 96 inches in length, have incredible detail and resolution. He is able to accomplish this feat by using focus stacking to enhance the depth of field of his photographs, which are then stitched together by overlapping each individual shot into a grid. His final prints can contain as many as one hundred photographs. Paley prefers this intricate process because the exceptional detail mimics how the eye/brain interprets an image, completely immersing the viewer into his photographs.

Paley holds a MA in history from Northeastern University and an MFA from Emerson College. He studied with Sam Abell at Maine Media Workshops in Rockport, Maine. In 2016–2017, Paley’s photographs of Maine downtowns were highlighted in a traveling exhibition at the Maine State House, Augusta, and the University of Maine’s Lord Hall Gallery (Orono) and Reed Gallery (Presque Isle). Paley’s work is in the collections of several museums, including the Portland Museum of Art.

 

T Bird, dye-sublimation on aluminum, 54.6 x 47 inches

 

Paley and his wife, who live in Portland, Maine, recently purchased a second home in Ellsworth to be closer to Acadia. They love Ellsworth, and now they split their time between these two year-round communities. Paley has since created over forty large-scale photographs of Ellsworth.

 

Heath Paley Portrait

Courthouse Gallery is located at 6 Court Street in Ellsworth. Courthouse Gallery is open for the season on April 24. Spring time hours will be Thursday–Saturday 11–5:30pm, or by appointment. For more information call 667-6611, or visit www.courthousegallery.com

Water and Fire, Drawings and Dirt: The 2018 Fiore Residents at Maine Farmland Trust Gallery

Michel Droge, “Yesterday’s Fires,” oil on birch panel, 30 x 40”

 

The 2018 Fiore Residents Exhibit opened March 18 and will be on display until May 24th. It concludes with artist talks at 5pm and a closing reception from 5:30-8pm at the MFT Gallery in Belfast.

During the summer of 2018 six visual artists, one writer, one performance artist and one gardener lived and worked together at Rolling Acres Farm in Jefferson, Maine. All had been selected for the Maine Farmland Trust’s (MFT’s) Fiore Art Center residency program, because of the common thread running through their work: a meaningful engagement with themes related to agriculture or the environment.

The solitude, natural setting and communal aspect of the residency allowed the artists to focus, explore and create in new ways. The exhibit of the work produced during their residency is a fabulous exploration of color, atmosphere, and connection to the natural environment.

 

Carol L. Douglas, “Blueberry Barrens, Watercolor,” watercolor on Yupo, 24 x 36”

 

Performance artist Heather Lyon woke many mornings at dawn to walk through dew-covered fields down to the lake. Working in and with the water, she ultimately crafted several performative videos. MFT Gallery displays her “Safety Poncho (Orange)” video. With its hushed silvery greys and bright red-oranges, the video engages in a riveting dialogue of water and fire with Michel Droge’s vibrant, atmospheric oil paintings: “Yesterday’s Fires” and “Pleiades Showers.” Through her interactions with the land and observation of constellations above the farm, Droge explored patterns in the micro and macro relationships of life in her watercolor and graphite drawing of “Queen Anne’s Last Wishes.”

Carol L. Douglas created her vivid plein air landscape paintings “Blueberry Barrens, Clary Hill” and “Blueberry Barrens, WC” in oils and watercolors respectively, investigating the confluence of paired painting to see if the fresh mark-making that occurred in her watercolors on Yupo would translate to her more familiar oil paintings.

 

Clif Travers, “I Dream of Trees,” print on canvas, 17.5 x 20”

 

Maxwell Nolin took advantage of the uninterrupted time in the studio to work on two large, luminous oil paintings, “Self-Portrait, 2018” and “Tea,” which enabled him to slow down and reflect on the conceptual aspects of his work, as well as explore different experimental techniques with his process.

In addition to working on her narrative manuscript, writer-in-residence Jodi Paloni produced a beautiful lyrical writing called “Rain Begins the Day,” which captures the essence of the farm landscape and the connection felt by all who were taken in and nurtured by it.

Clif Travers spent time exploring the natural environment of the field and woods and connecting with the community at the farm. In the studio, he constructed an 8 x 6 foot sculptural panel using discarded lumber and other wood products, in an attempt to honor and reconstruct the beauty of trees. Travers then painted the three-dimensional panel in a style referencing church mosaics and stained-glass windows. He contributed a print of the stunning “I Dream of Trees” for this exhibit.

During her residency, Stephanie Mercedes continued building archives of missing violent histories and created a variation of her “Relicarios” installation. Mercedes’ work honors the grandmothers who protested the disappearance of their children by wearing lockets. Her work on display includes research on those that escaped political persecution in Argentina and relocated to Maine, drawings, and a lighted locket.

Thu Kim Vu, from Vietnam, was inspired by the personal bonds formed during the residency through the communal kitchen, food, and the garden. She created a wonderful series of miniature paper drawings of pots, pans, and utensils glued on several overlapping sheets of Plexiglas that are designed to be viewed through the natural light of a window.

 

Heather Lyon, RED, still from performative video

 

In addition to growing unusual vegetables and ornamental food for the residents, the resident gardener Rachel Alexandrou created a video installation called “The Nature of Stewardship”. This was inspired by her work in the garden and kitchen and explores the relationship between human, body and earth.