Archive for Bangor

The UMaine Museum of Art’s presents GreenDrinks

This October, join us in celebrating Artober at the University of Maine Museum of Art, in Bangor with the Home Brewers of Greater Bangor for ARTOBERFEST!

UMMA’s Fall 2019 exhibitions will be open for viewing: Entangled: Nina Jerome, Way Stations: Joan Belmar, Studio Visit: New Works by Six Painters, and selected photographs from the Museum Collection.

On October 8 from 5-8, the Home Brewers will be serving up a creative variety of their own creations.  Greendrinkers can vote for their favorite beer and the top 3 brewers will win Buoy Local gift cards!

Greendrinks will be serving red and white wines vinted at Central Street Farmhouse for our gluten free or non-beer drinking friends.

As always, Greendrinks is a free family-friendly event, so bring the kiddos! There is a suggested $5 donation, and we ask that you bring your own drinking vessel. If you forget, we’ll have compostable cups available for $1, and custom glassware for $5. Proceeds from the event go toward helping Bangor Greendrinks provide grants to fund worthy projects that help make Bangor greener. See you there!

The Sohn’s Gallery Presents Works by Jon Taner

The Sohns Gallery, located in The Rock & Art Shop at 36 Central Street in Bangor, presents Collage Works by Jon Taner . 

Jon Taner recently moved back to the area to be part of the Bangor art scene. He was born and raised in New Jersey. His studied at the Art Students League in New York City. He obtained his Bachelor of Fine Arts from California College of the Arts and his Master of Fine Arts from Syracuse University where he was awarded a Ford Foundation Grant.

When describing his works Taner says “I have used shape, color and scale to create a sense of things both strange and familiar; to flavor the known with the unknown; and give to the viewer a sense of discovery amid scenes and objects. This intriguing ambiguity for the viewer is a result of their memory, abstraction of the natural world, surrealist images, and the melding of all these things into a subjective interpretation. Painting is as much an act of discovery for me as it is for the viewer. The fulfillment from the act of creating both individual and collective works of art is more satisfying the less predictable my paths, and more surprising my destinations.”  Jon Taner’s works are a true delight to the eye and a must see in person. 

The show runs through Oct. 5th and can be viewed any day between 10am and 6pm in The Rock & Art Shop. A closing reception will be held on October 4th at 6:30, Artist Talk at 7.

The UMaine Museum of Art’s presents Artist & Curator: Collaboration in Contemporary Art

NINA JEROME (American, born 1950) Entangled Spring, 2019 Oil on linen Courtesy of the artist

The UMaine Museum of Art’s presents

Studio Visit

Artist & Curator: Collaboration in Contemporary Art

WEDNESDAY, September 25th, 2019 at 40 Harlow Street in Bangor

5:30 – 6 PM : wine and cheese reception

6:00 – 7 PM: Panel discussion featuring

Jaime DeSimone, Associate Curator of Contemporary Art, Portland Museum of Art

Alfredo Gisholt, Artist and Associate Professor of Art, Brandeis University

Nina Jerome, Artist and Retired Professor of Art, University of Maine

George Kinghorn, Director and Curator, UMaine Museum of Art

How do museums and curators propel the careers of artists? How do studio visits inform the curatorial process? How does the collaborative relationship between curator and artist influence the final exhibition? Join us for this lively panel discussion featuring four voices in contemporary art.

This event is FREE, however, seating is limited. First come, first serve. RSVP required by calling 207-581-3370 or email kathrynj@maine.edu

UMaine Museum of Art announces Fall Exhibitions

The University of Maine Museum of Art, located at 40 Harlow Street in downtown Bangor, opens three new exhibitions in September 2019. UMMA is open Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am – 5 pm and brings modern and contemporary art to the region, presenting approximately 12 original exhibitions each year. UMMA’s fall shows open to the public on September 13 and run through December 21, 2019. Admission to the Museum of Art is free in 2019 thanks to the generosity of Deighan Wealth Advisors.

JOAN BELMAR Polaris, 2019

WAY STATIONS: JOAN BELMAR
September 13 – December 21, 2019

Way Stations features a stunning assortment of new abstract paintings by New York-based artist Joan Belmar. Spherical forms, often filled with transparent textural passages, populate Belmar’s compositions and are often combined with segmented lines, dots, and portal-like constructions. “Circles represent the infinite”, says Belmar, adding that they “suggest, like a Russian doll that contains one inside the other, world or way stations within other worlds.”

Belmar offers multiple vantage points and structures in his compositions. It’s as if we are looking at surface topographies of unnamed planets through a telescope, or perhaps glancing down at outstretched maps to plot routes through unknown terrain. A focal point of the exhibition is an expansive wall showcasing two tondo paintings, each 92 inches in diameter, which were created especially for the UMMA exhibition. These circular works highlight the collage-like approach and layering seen in many of the artist’s compositions—solid blocks and bands of bold color share space with spherical forms that have a pattern overlay of hand-painted dots.

Belmar was born in Chile and immigrated to the United States in 1999. His works are in the collections of the Microsoft Corporation, Capital One Corporation, and Fidelity Investment, among others.

NINA JEROME Entangled Spring, 2019

 

ENTANGLED: NINA JEROME
September 13 – December 21, 2019

Entangled features a new series of paintings and drawings by Maine-based artist Nina Jerome. Invasive wild grape vines, that Jerome encountered while at a recent artist residency, inspire these exuberant and expressive compositions. Ranging from the monochromatic to vividly colored paintings, the artist has captured the gesture and wild energy of these tangled masses. Jerome states, “the movement and joyful choreography of their entanglement express the variety and excitement of life’s experiences, yet the tangled knots also create obstacles within our interconnected systems.”

A focal point of the exhibition is the large-scale Thicket that is composed of nine individual panels hung in a dramatic grid. Measuring 7 ½ x 7 ½ feet, the work contains a bustling array of overlapping curvilinear lines in bold black with contrasting blue gestural marks. For Jerome the circular forms, “capture the chaos of nature and seems to balance on the edge of beauty and destruction.” In addition to the drawings and monochromatic paintings, the artist also reveals her skill as a colorist. In two striking compositions, Entangled Red and Dance, the artist employs an expressionistic palette—the looping vines are depicted in intense reds while the background is rendered in vivid blues.  The works in Entangled provide an open window to Jerome’s creative process. In the exhibition, one sees the evolution of her art from small, spontaneous and spirited drawings to larger and more structured works on canvas for which the artist is most known.  

ALFREDO GISHOLT Night Studio 1, 2019

STUDIO VISIT: New Works by Six Painters
September 13 – December 21, 2019

Studio Visit brings together a selection of new works by six notable painters working throughout the United States. Ranging from hard-edged to densely layered compositions, this exhibition showcases each artist’s unique approach to abstraction. Intimate 6 x 8 inch oil paintings share space with boldly colored, large-scale canvases, some of which span eight feet.

Thomas Berding’s (East Lansing, Michigan) information-rich paintings live in a perpetual state “between construction and deconstruction, representation and abstraction, addition and deletion”. There’s a spatial complexity to Berding’s paintings in which his raucous assembly of overlapping shapes, bands, shards, and ambiguous detritus seems to recede into infinity.

Joanne Freeman (New York, New York) captures lighthearted gestures in an assortment of hard-edged compositions. Within Freeman’s bold shapes are colors ranging from vivid-blues to saturated reds. The artist sets up a beautiful tension in which these shapes are arranged in close proximity, but do not touch. In several of her new paintings the weight of the larger forms balances the delicateness of the seemingly malleable, slender, red-orange forms.

Alfredo Gisholt’s (Boston, Massachusetts) oil paintings are populated with eccentric forms captured through spirited, gestural brushstrokes. Gisholt’s compositions are both humorous and ominous in the same instance. A mélange of fractured shapes, curvy lines, and other enigmatic devises share space and invite the viewer to invent narratives while also observing the materiality of paint.

Rachel Hellmann’s (Terre Haute, Indiana) shaped compositions explore the intersection of painting and sculpture while offering an interplay of geometry, light, and color. Crafted from poplar wood, Hellman’s forms are meticulously planed, cut, pieced together, glued, clamped, and sanded. The artist’s painted bands depict color relationships that range from monochromatic to vividly bold; the arrangement of the elements is in direct response to the unique qualities of each sculpted form.

In Suzanne Laura Kammin’s (Newark, New Jersey) abstract oil paintings, hard-edged forms unite with transparent gestural brushwork. In compositions that bring to mind the crisp, spray-painted marks of certain types of graffiti, the artist has employed a dynamic palette ranging from vibrant reds and saturated yellows to bold greens. Kammin states that she contrasts “smooth, minimal shapes of pure color against distressed and improvisatory passages to create a sense of expansiveness, magic, and mystery.”

At first glance, Matt Phillips’ (New York, New York) paintings may appear to be rooted solely in rigid geometric abstraction, but within each defined shape are complex and rich passages achieved through delicate brushwork. Phillips’ fractured forms seem to be in a state of fluctuation, as if one is looking at shifting patterns and light through a kaleidoscope.

The Sohns Gallery Presents Works by Local Artist Jeff Wahlstrom

The Sohns Gallery announces a solo exhibition by local artist Jeff Wahlstrom. This is Wahlstroms first exhibition with The Sohns Gallery

Wahlstroms has mastered the watercolor Collages technique out of a need to gain control over the watercolor media .The artist states,”I have the fun of casually painting sheet after sheet of watercolor paper with swaths of colors and then cutting, tearing, and gluing pieces to “build” my landscapes. This process of adding layer upon layer of paper can take on a sculptural quality as I work to capture and give dimension to the inspiring landscapes and seascapes of Maine and Atlantic Canada.”

Block-printing is a relatively new art form for the artist—one that also gives him a sense of control as he shapes an image from a block of linoleum or wood. It is a process that has its own sculptural elements to it, as the artist must cut and carve into each block, making a relief sculpture of sorts. Wahlstrom states, “There is always a bit of a surprise and often some unexpected results, but block printing has given me a way to not only create landscapes but to also illustrate scenes from my community and capture life here in Maine.”

Watercolor Collages and Block prints by Jeff Wahlstrom will be on view during regular business hours at The Sohns Gallery in The Rock & Art Shop, 36 Central Street Bangor, Maine. The exhibit runs Through August 24, 2019.  An opening reception will be held Friday, August 2, at 6:30 pm and the artist will be on site to give remarks at 7:00. This event is free and open to the public.

Bangor Public Library Presents “David Estey – A 69-Year Retrospective”

Fishers, 2018 acrylic & graphite on Yupo, 41 ½” x 53 1/2 “

 

Bangor Public Library presents “David Estey – A 69-Year Retrospective” opening August 1, with a reception from 5:00 to 8:00, 1st Friday, August 2 and an art talk at 6:30. The exhibit features over 40 drawings, paintings and prints by the Belfast artist from his self-portrait at age 8 to his current, improvisational abstracts. The PowerPoint presentation of his life’s work includes humorous anecdotes from his published memoir of growing up in Aroostook County and his life beyond. The exhibit ends Sunday, September 29. 

For more information, call Candis Joyce at 207 947-8336 ext. 127 or visit www.davidestey.com.

UMaine Museum of Art announces Summer Exhibitions

The University of Maine Museum of Art, located at 40 Harlow Street in downtown Bangor, opens three new exhibitions in May 2019. UMMA is open Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am – 5 pm and brings modern and contemporary art to the region, presenting approximately 12 original exhibitions each year. UMMA’s summer shows open to the public on May 17 and run through August 31, 2019. Admission to the Museum of Art is free in 2019 thanks to the generosity of Deighan Wealth Advisors.

 

 

Harold Garde, Councils, 1986, Acrylic on canvas

 

 

WHEN THERE WAS ANOTHER ME: HAROLD GARDE

When There Was Another Me, a large-scale exhibition featuring an assortment of forceful and stimulating works by Harold Garde. The artist, who splits his time between Florida and Maine, has exhibited widely throughout the United States. Garde, now in his 96th year, continues to produce works of great energy, intensity, and relevance.

While Garde has created a vast quantity of paintings and many unique series throughout his life’s work—from chairs to kimonos to solely abstract compositions—UMMA’s exhibition offers an extensive and focused look at recurrent subjects from throughout his career: figure and portraits. Within these selected works one sees the authority of Garde’s mark making and his spirited use of color. The figurative pieces chosen for this exhibition are emotionally complex, challenging, and unharnessed. At times they are humorous, confounding, and even unnerving. Above all, they convey conflicting states of mind as well as the complex nature of humanity; topics that are particularly relevant in contemporary art and society today.

Although the artist’s early exposure to Abstract Expressionism continues to infuse his paintings today, his ongoing exploration of portraiture and the figure conveys another significant facet of his enduring creative practice. The 35 works showcased at UMMA draw connections to early Expressionists, particularly German artists such as Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Karl Schmidt-Rottluff. Both artists were among the founders in 1905 of the formidable artist group Die Brücke (The Bridge). This group sought to create a new form of artistic expression in which color and subject matter were liberated from all traditional approaches. This commanding selection of expressionistic works celebrates Harold Garde’s passionate and unique point of view as well as his prolific and rigorous studio practice.

 

 

Julie Beck, Creation of Eve, 2018, Oil on canvas

 

 

OUR HANDS ARE FULL OF COLOR: JULIE BECK

The subject of Julie Beck’s oil paintings are primarily animals, still life, and the figure. Beck, who lives and works in Boston, creates works that are rendered in striking detail. With the eye of a discerning collector, the artist searches antique stores for unique objects to arrange within her paintings. Beck adds “I use objects that are loaded with personal meaning—artifacts from my own history or found objects that evoked a particular memory or feeling.”

Beck often combines unexpected elements in her portraits. While her sitters are rendered in a realist manner, she employs a more whimsical approach and expressive treatment in the background. For example, in Optical Delusion, the young woman’s facial features and clothing are carefully modeled, while the background is an array of expressive colored brushstrokes that seem to move behind the figure.

 

 

ALISON WELD, Birthright, 1997, Oil and upholstery on canvas

 

 

SYMPHONY OF PASSION: ALISON WELD

Symphony of Passion offers a glimpse at over 40 years of studio practice by New York-based artist Alison Weld. The exhibition incorporates paintings from several of Weld’s unique series. Prominently featured are large-scale diptychs that represent an important series of works from 1994-2003 titled Home Economics. Boldly painted abstract panels are juxtaposed with mass-produced, patterned upholstery fabric. For instance, in the left panel of Psyche’s Soul,1997, Weld’s brushstrokes have yielded a turbulent tangle of textured, warm-toned marks as if she’s rendered the ferocious energy of a firestorm. In contrast, the composition’s right panel consists of appropriated designer fabric that depicts various butterflies and moth species. Instead of being quiet, saccharine depictions of winged creatures, the complex, frenzied pattern of layered insects balances beautifully with the raw energy of the abutted oil on canvas. While the surface texture and imagery on the two panels are vastly different, the diptych is unified through the warmth of Weld’s palette on the left and the orange, earthy hues of the butterfly’s wings on the right.

With roots in Abstract Expressionism, Weld’s Tonal Variation series is characterized by a richness of mark-marking and the gradual buildup of lush textural surfaces. The artist refers to these works as “assemblages” in which she brings together newer paintings and older works to investigate new relationships—while also re-contextualizing the past. Metabolic Histories, 2015, is a stellar example of the Tonal Variation series in that it apposes five separate energetic canvases. This composition will be dismantled during the exhibition and, at various intervals, three of the canvases will be paired with their original panels to form distinct new compositions. Metabolic Histories is a vehicle for viewers to witness the sort of experimentation that is most commonly seen within the confines of an artist’s studio.

Sohns Gallery Solo Exhibit “Oh You Pretty Things” by Kat Johnson

 

The Sohns Gallery at The Rock & Art Shop in Bangor announces a solo exhibition by local artist Kat Johnson, Oh You Pretty Things. The exhibit runs March 4 – April 28, with an opening reception Friday, March 8 at 6:30 pm. The artist will be on site to give remarks at 7:30. This event is free and open to the public.

Oh You Pretty Things will include all new works created in the past six months. The exhibition will showcase eight new large relief prints. These framed works will be for sale along with the unframed prints in the edition and other smaller prints of various subjects. The artist will be donating a portion of all sales made during the duration of the show to Mabel Wadsworth Center.

Johnson has lived and worked in Bangor for over fifteen years and this is her fourth solo show in the area and second at the Sohns Gallery. Johnson works as the Senior Museum Educator and Marketing Manager at the University of Maine Museum of Art in Downtown Bangor. She received her Masters of Fine Art in Intermedia in 2012 from the University of Maine and has been an active member of the creative community since her arrival in Maine in 2003.

This is the second exhibition of Johnson’s work at the Sohns Gallery. The first showing was a large scale evolving painting which was the inaugural show in the gallery. Having focused on painting for many years, Johnson has now turned to printmaking to create her images. Regarding this shift Johnson stated, “I’ve always painted large, flat areas of color with bold line work, very much in the style of a screen print or relief print. I thought it was time I finally made that leap to fully delve into the process of printmaking.”

UMaine Museum of Art announces Winter Exhibitions

 The University of Maine Museum of Art, located at 40 Harlow Street in downtown Bangor, opens three new exhibitions in January. UMMA is open Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am – 5 pm and brings modern and contemporary art to the region, presenting approximately 12 original exhibitions each year. UMMA’s winter shows open to the public on January 18 and runs through May 4, 2019. Admission to the Museum of Art is free in 2019 thanks to the generosity of Deighan Wealth Advisors.

REVERSIBLE ROLES: MEGHAN BRADY

Meghan Brady, Blue + Gold Gardenhead 2018, oil on canvas

Meghan Brady’s large-scale paintings and collages are brought to life through intense color saturation and dynamic, abstract forms. The compositions are vibrantly structured with unadulterated blues, intense yellows, and oranges. The focal point of the exhibition is a work titled Everyday that spans over 16 feet and explores shape and form on a grand scale. The artist states, “The container form—human or otherwise—is a jumping off point to do what I want to do, which is to construct, deconstruct, and hopefully land somewhere totally unexpected.” Brady also layers bold colors, such as acidic green over deep blue, as a means of creating unique shapes in her compelling compositions. The use of saturated color and powerful gestural marks articulate Brady’s exploration of energetic geometric forms and how they relate to each other.

The selected works of Reversible Roles involve both the concept of representation and abstraction and explore how the negative spaces—the spaces created between and around color—can become the focal point of the piece. Brady explains, “Negative shapes are the by-product of cutting shapes from canvas and these shapes transform from negative to positive in the course of one quick decision.” These works are the culmination of Brady’s practice of working with diverse media, including ceramics, woodcut, collage, and oil paint as a means of expanding her creative praxis and extending her process. Brady adds, “Reversible Roles is about the possibility of upending expectations by swapping places. Or in the case of painting, turning them upside down, placing them on the floor, or cutting them in half.” Producing works of this size is a challenging endeavor. The physicality of this process is like a dance between artist and canvas and this corporeality infuses the paintings with energy, spirit, and life.

BIG ROCK CANDY MOUNTAIN: ZACH HORN

Zach Horn, Tomatoes 2018, graphite on arches

 

Boston-based artist Zach Horn has created an exhibition where food and landscape take center stage. Horn has depicted key ingredients of a picnic: a watermelon, sliced cucumbers, a hot dog, bowls of spaghetti and even a life-sized gingham blanket. A massive graphite drawing of a cave functions like a backdrop that allows the viewer to almost step into the scene. In another area, the viewer confronts a three-dimensional sculpture of a yellow-hued mountain range that curiously projects from the wall.

Pattern and repetition are prominently featured throughout these selected works. In the large graphite drawing Tomatoes, 2018, the artist has meticulously rendered slices of tomatoes placed in perfect rows. Horn states, “The food pictures are arranged in symmetrical abstraction, often with a closed composition. It’s recognizable form, but it is couched in the language of spiritual abstraction: patterns, mandalas, the grid, and the sublime landscape”. The artist’s celebration of routine daily tasks and the importance of coming together around food have inspired these compositions. The repetitive act of carefully preparing ingredients for the family meal may be a ruminative experience, just as drawing may be a meditative act. Ultimately, Horn invites the viewer to contemplate feelings evoked through food and the environment.

EDGING FORWARD: RICHARD KEEN

Richard Keen, Form Singularity No. 107 2017, acrylic and oil on canvas

 

Maine-based artist Richard Keen explores abstraction in both paintings and mixed media, wall-oriented sculptures. Keen states that “experiences are brought into focus by removing unnecessary detail, often simplifying the world into line, shape, color and texture.” In his paintings there are often predominant solid shapes, sometimes further accentuated by precisely painted pin-striped lines, that occupy other expanses of color. Imbued with order and clarity, the angular forms in Keen’s paintings seem to be derived from aerial views of the landscape. Dominant central shapes often have smaller lines that are like pathways or roads, leading the eye off the picture plane.Shapes that emerge in Keen’s paintings inform his wall sculptures—often incorporating surfaces created by sanding though successive layers of paint. Originally inspired by the undersides of boats being stripped of paint, Keen’s revelation of these layers of history is integral to his process. The quirky, enigmatic forms created by the artist integrate objects such discarded wood and other found materials.  Using polyester resin, fillers and spray enamel, Keen brings together these contrasting surfaces within his singular compositions.

Yikes Studio: Enamel Class and Limited Necklace Sale

Beach Cascade

 

SALE

Four, beautiful, long, statement necklaces on sale for a limited time only. These necklaces traveled with me this fall to a couple shows but a match has yet to be made for these beauties! The necklaces are one-of-a-kind and very limited. The sale runs through end of Feb. To view images and purchase go to www.suzanneanderson.me

CLASSES

Sign up now for this basic introduction to the art of enameling. Learn the magic of fusing colored glass to metal. This 4 hour class will cover all the basic techniques: applying powdered glass, scrafitto, liquid enamels, metal prep, firing, finishing and creating simple earrings and a pendant. The cost for the class is $80 + $20 materials fee. Class size is limited to 5.

Saturday, February 16, 9:30-1:30 SOLD OUT!
Sunday, Feb 17, 9:30-1:30 limited space still available

The classes are being held at Rebecca Krupke Studio, 9 Central St. Suite 308,  Bangor. To sign up visit: www.rebeccakrupke.com