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Maine Crafts Guild Announces Brunswick Fine Craft Show, Oct. 7-8, 2017

Detail of “Sunflowers” textile paint on canvas and cotton by Catherine Worthington

Detail of “Sunflowers” textile paint on canvas and cotton by Catherine Worthington

The Maine Crafts Guild, in celebration of American Craft Week, will present the Brunswick Fine Craft Show on October 7 & 8, 2017 in Brunswick, Maine at the Fort Andross Mill Complex. This American Craft Week event will offer excellence in fine craft designed and handmade by professional Maine artisans.

Brunswick-based textile artist and new member, Catherine Worthington will exhibit her distinctive painted and stitched textiles. Worthington says, “As I explore the medium of textile painting I am often discovering the balance between abstraction and representation. I love the colors, patterns and textures in the landscape and strive to capture its essence as I paint, creating a rich surface. My process of cutting, piecing and stitching adds abstraction, depth and dimension.”

In the studio with jeweler, Christine Peters, finishing a silver cuff bracelet

In the studio with jeweler, Christine Peters, finishing a silver cuff bracelet

Returning member and jeweler, Christine Peters of Damariscotta, will exhibit her ever-popular silver and gold designs. “I design and create elements and textures which I abstract and simplify the shapes to use over again within a series, playing with different finishes and components for unique looks. My designs are classic and simple, yet modern and strong. Each piece is created deliberately–intentionally and reinforced through the process of making.” says Peters.

As a proud participant in American Craft Week, the Brunswick Fine Craft Show will bring buyers and artists together for unique shopping experiences in wood, metal, clay, natural fibers and glass. Admission: $4 adults; under 18 free. October 7 & 8, 2017: Sat. 10am – 5pm & Sun. 10am – 4pm. Fort Andross Mill Complex, 14 Maine Street, Brunswick, Maine. For more information please email: brunswick.show@mainecraftsguild.com or call 207-460-8018. mainecraftsguild.com

Groundbreaking Exhibition of Memento Mori from the Renaissance Opens at Bowdoin College Museum

Chicart Bailly, Pendant to a Rosary or Chaplet, Paris, France (?), ca. 1500–1530, elephant ivory with traces of polychromy, Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit. Courtesy of Bowdoin College Museum of Art

Chicart Bailly, Pendant to a Rosary or Chaplet, Paris, France (?), ca. 1500–1530, elephant ivory with traces of polychromy, Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit. Courtesy of Bowdoin College Museum of Art

The Bowdoin College Museum of Art (BCMA) will soon open a groundbreaking exhibition on the visual culture of mortality and morality in early Renaissance Europe. On view from June 24 to November 26, 2017, The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe reveals how, in an increasingly complex and uncertain world, Renaissance artists sought to address the critical human concern of acknowledging death while striving to create a personal legacy that might outlast it.

Featuring nearly 70 objects, this exhibition incorporates rarely-seen loans from major North American and European museums and works from Bowdoin’s own collection revealing new insights into the understanding of mortality and morality in Renaissance Europe. An elegant installation, organized into eight thematic sections, focused on subjects such as selfhood, morality, piety, and anatomy, enables audiences to understand the broad range of inspirations for and implications of memento mori imagery. Cases provide the opportunity to see ivory prayer beads and other statuettes in the round and in the context of paintings and prints from the period by leading artists such as Albrecht Dürer and Hans Holbein. Magnifying glasses further permit close examination of the exceptional detail with which artists of the period wrought the ivory objects brought together for the first time in The Ivory Mirrror.

Portrait of a Surgeon, Netherlands, 1569, oil on wood. Theodore M. Davis Collection, Bequest of Theodore M. Davis, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Portrait of a Surgeon, Netherlands, 1569, oil on wood. Theodore M. Davis Collection, Bequest of Theodore M. Davis, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

“While we recognize the Renaissance as an age of exceptional human progress and artistic achievement, macabre images proliferated in precisely this period: unsettling depictions of Death personified, of decaying bodies, of young lovers struck down in their prime. This provocative imagery runs riot in the remarkable array of artworks featured in The Ivory Mirror. For many scholars, these gruesome objects seem to be a last gasp, as it were, of a dying medieval world view, of a culture obsessed with the certainty of death, terrified by the threat of divine judgment, and incapable of enjoying earthly life,” continued curator Stephen Perkinson, “The Ivory Mirror rethinks that traditional view, seeking to understand these morbid images as intimately bound up in the period’s shifting conceptions of the self, of the place of humanity in the world, and of the nature of sin and pleasure. It demonstrates that these objects simultaneously reminded viewers not only of life’s fleeting nature but also of the need to both enjoy one’s time on earth and to live a moral and responsible life.”

Memento Mori Pendant, probably from a rosary, France or Belgium, ca. 1500, ivory. Walter E. Stait Fund, 2007, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Memento Mori Pendant, probably from a rosary, France or Belgium, ca. 1500, ivory. Walter E. Stait Fund, 2007, Philadelphia Museum of Art

The BCMA will display highlights from their own collection alongside artworks loaned from the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Ashmolean Museum at the University of Oxford, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Walters Art Museum among others.

Fully accessible, the Bowdoin College Museum of Art is open to the public free of charge from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday through Saturday; 10:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on Thursday, and from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Sunday.

For more information please visit Bowdoin College Museum of Art’s website or call 207-725-3275.

Why Draw? 500 Years of Drawings and Watercolors at Bowdoin College

Woman and Child, 1604– 1606, black and red chalk by Bernardino Poccetti

Woman and Child, 1604–
1606, black and red chalk
by Bernardino Poccetti

The Bowdoin College Museum of Art (BCMA) will present the first-ever survey of the Museum’s extensive collection of drawings, widely considered the oldest public collection of works on paper on the continent, illuminating the foundational and evolving role of drawing within Western artistic practice. Titled Why Draw? 500 Years of Drawings and Watercolors at Bowdoin College, the exhibition will be on view from May 3 through September 3, 2017.

Tango for Page Turning, 2013, Single channel HD video; 2 minutes, 48 seconds by William Kentridge

Tango for Page
Turning, 2013,
Single channel HD
video; 2 minutes,
48 seconds by
William Kentridge

The exhibition includes more than 150 works by American and European artists across cultures, genres, and time periods, such as Peter Paul Rubens, Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, John Singleton Copley, Winslow Homer, Henri Matisse, Eva Hesse, and Roy Lichtenstein, among many others. Why Draw? will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue that features original texts from renowned scholars and contemporary artists, all considering what compels artists to draw through close study of specific works in the exhibition. These insights, from contributors including David Driskell, Richard Tuttle, James Siena, and Yvonne Jacquette form the touchstones of both the exhibition and the catalogue, guiding viewers through an examination of the traditional functions of drawings in artistic education, studio practice, and the formal; and poetic reasons artists have been driven to drawing throughout history. The Museum will also host several public programs throughout the summer in conjunction with the exhibition, including artist talks, scholarly lectures, and artist-led workshops.

The End of the Hunt, 1892, watercolor over graphite, by Winslow Homer

The End of the Hunt,
1892, watercolor
over graphite, by
Winslow Homer

Curated by Joachim Homann, Curator at BCMA, the exhibition builds on the foundation of Bowdoin’s strong history of collecting works on paper, stemming back to the initial gift of 141 historic European drawings to the college by James Bowdoin III in 1811. Since then the drawings collection has evolved to include nearly 2,000 unique works on paper, encompassing acquisitions and gifts from alumni, artists, and patrons. Many recent additions to the collection will be on view for the first time. Spanning from a drawing from the workshop of Raphael, to the first-ever watercolor by Winslow Homer to enter a museum collection, to works produced in the past five years by Natalie Frank, William Kentridge, and Titus Kaphar, the exhibition offers a diverse selection of masterworks from artists across a wide range of history.

Untitled Drawing, 1943 graphite and colored crayon, by Arshile Gorky

Untitled Drawing,
1943
graphite and colored
crayon, by Arshile
Gorky

Fully accessible, the Bowdoin College Museum of Art is open to the public free of charge from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday through Saturday; 10:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on Thursday, and from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Sunday. 

For more information visit the Bowdoin College Museum of Art website.

The Maine Crafts Guild brings American Craft Week to Brunswick, Maine

Blue Sky, Golden Sun earrings by Cathy Heinz of Cathy Heinz Designs

Blue Sky, Golden Sun earrings by Cathy Heinz of Cathy Heinz Designs

The Maine Crafts Guild, in celebration of American Craft Week, will present the Brunswick Fine Craft Show on October 8 & 9, 2016 in Brunswick Maine at the Fort Andross Mill Complex. This American Craft Week event will offer excellence in fine craft designed and handmade by professional Maine artisans.

American Craft Week began as a small, grassroots effort to enhance the knowledge and appreciation of handmade craft. In 1975, these same principles inspired a community of Maine artisans to establish the Maine Crafts Guild and continue to guide the organization.

Bird carving by Erwin Flewelling of Nestlewood Birds

Bird carving by Erwin Flewelling of Nestlewood Birds

“American Craft Week has caught the imagination of so many supporters,” said Diane Sulg, founder and co-chair of the event. “With the growing appreciation of both artisan products and American-made goods, craft is highly regarded for its strong design, quality materials, expert workmanship and enduring value.”

Bowl and tops by Lanny Dean of Lanny’s Woodturning

Bowl and tops by Lanny Dean of Lanny’s Woodturning

As a proud participant in American Craft Week, the Guild’s Brunswick Fine Craft Show will bring buyers and artists together for unique shopping experiences in wood, metal, clay, natural fibers and glass. The traditional Maine manufacturing setting of the renovated Fort Andross Mill Complex and live music will ensure a celebratory atmosphere.

Admission: $3 adults; under 18 free. October 8 & 9, 2016: Sat. 10am – 5pm & Sun. 10am – 4pm. Fort Andross Mill Complex, 14 Maine Street, Brunswick, Maine. For more information please email: brunswick.show@mainecraftsguild.com or call 207-754-4490. mainecraftsguild.com

Wendy Newcomb Returns to Bayview Gallery

Bayview Gallery is delighted to welcome Wendy Newcomb back into our fold.  Living among the beauty of Maine’s lush landscapes, extensive lakes, streams and impressive rocky coasts, Wendy is continuously inspired to capture this imagery in her paintings.  Her palette conveys the magnetism of the environment.  The colors, while true to what she sees, have a vibrancy that reflects her prowess with her medium as well as her passion for her subjects.

As the Tide Turns and Cloudscape, both are oil on panel, 24" x 36"

As the Tide Turns and Cloudscape, both are oil on panel, 24″ x 36″

Wendy reflects on her paintings:

“My paintings represent a visual journal of my life in Maine.  My work reflects my love of nature and my participation in it.  Spending time walking, hiking, kayaking, and biking, I have the opportunity to stop and look closely at my surroundings.  It is this connection to nature that I want to recreate in order to share it with others.  Often, my intent is to give the viewer a sense of being there with me, whether climbing a rock, floating down a river, or looking closely at various plant life.”

To add one of Wendy’s paintings (or any painting on our website) to your collection, call Cally or Susan at the Gallery (800-244-3007), art@bayviewgallery.com, or http://www.bayviewgallery.com

Bayview Gallery Exhibits a New Still Life from Gayle Levée

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Still life paintings are more than just a random collection of flowers, fruit, containers and objects.  In the Boston School tradition, there is often meaning and symbolism to the elements the artist selects.

Gayle discusses her inspiration for Peace:
“The story of this painting is rather amusing and perhaps not everyone will relate to it.  When I was planning the piece, we had recently  acquired a new puppy.  I began thinking about tender little beginnings like babies and puppies. The little rose in the middle of the arrangement represents that. The other objects represent other stages in life, and the keys are the keys to the mystery of life.”

Peace by Gayle Levee, oil on canvas, 36" x 36"

Peace by Gayle Levee, oil on canvas, 36″ x 36″

For more information visit www.bayviewgallery.com or call 1-800-244-3007