Archive for Colby College Museum of Art

Catch the Fall Exhibitions at the Colby Museum

Torkwase Dyson, Nautical Dusk installation, 2018

 

The Colby College Museum of Art creates academically robust and engaging exhibitions. This fall, the Colby Museum is pleased to present the following exhibitions: Torkwase Dyson: Nautical Dusk (through January 6, 2019), Darkness Visible: Goya Prints from the Lunder Collection (through January 20, 2019), Nancy Spero: Unbound (through January 20, 2019), and Currents 8: Carly Glovinski (through February 17, 2019).

Torkwase Dyson: Nautical Dusk
At the invitation of the Museum, the New Jersey-based artist Torkwase Dyson visited Waterville to consult archival materials related to Samuel Osborne (c. 1833–1904). Born into slavery on a Virginia plantation, Osborne migrated to Maine in 1865 and served as a Colby College janitor from 1867 to 1903. In the works she produced for Nautical Dusk, Dyson combines simple geometric forms infused with metaphorical associations found in obituaries of Osborne written by unnamed white authors. These texts raise questions about authorship, transmission, and self-determination, all issues that she will continue to unpack over the run of the show. Nautical Dusk features sculptures and paintings that explore these subjects in a formal register through intimacy, liquidity, and reflectiveness. What results are expanded dimensions of space. Occupying half the gallery is a work entitled Dusk, a monolithic ramp that functions as an architectural intervention, activating the space and inviting engagement or contemplation. It suggests a promontory, an outcropping from which to scan or surveil, but also a structure partially submerged.

Torkwase Dyson (b. 1973) was born in Chicago, Illinois, and spent her developmental years between North Carolina and Mississippi before earning her BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University and her MFA from the Yale School of Art. She was recently included in the 2018 group exhibition Between the Waters at the Whitney Museum of American Art and will be included in the 2019 Sharjah Biennial.

 

Carly Glovinski, Canyon Picnic, 2018. Acrylic on laser-cut plexiglass; acrylic on paper, photographs, plexiglass, wood.

 

Currents 8: Carly Glovinski
Established by the Colby Museum in 2004, the Currents exhibition series is dedicated to emerging artists with connections to Maine. For the eighth installment of the series, Carly Glovinski has created a group of works for a two-part exhibition on the theme of landscape that is on view currently at the Colby Museum and the Waterville Public Library. At the Colby Museum the commissioned works include painted sculptures and works on paper inspired by works in the Lunder Collection, several of which are on view in an adjacent gallery arranged by the artist. For the portion of the exhibition mounted at the Waterville Public Library, Glovinski has produced a group of three-dimensional paintings that closely resemble books in the library’s collection. These painted objects are exhibited on the library’s shelves. Designed to be explored by the hand and eye, they can be discovered by library patrons via a finding aid.

The Currents 8 catalogue will be available in late 2018 and will feature essays by Lunder Curator of American Art Elizabeth Finch and the writer Heidi Julavits.

Carly Glovinski (b. 1981) holds a BFA from Boston University and has shown her work nationally. She grew up in Berwick, Maine, and has a studio in nearby Rollinsford, New Hampshire.

 

Francisco de Goya, El sueño de la razón produce monstruos from Los Caprichos, 1799. Bound set of 80 intaglios on cream laid paper, 12 1/4 x 8 1/8 x 7/8 in.

 

Darkness Visible: Goya Prints from the Lunder Collection
During his lifetime the Spanish artist Francisco de Goya (1746–1828) was known for his commissioned works, but his independently produced prints are arguably his greatest achievement. This focused exhibition from the Lunder Collection includes a bound copy of Goya’s Los Caprichos (1799), accompanied by a digital resource that allows visitors to see an image of each print in the order Goya established for the series. The exhibition also includes a 19th-century commentary, or “key” to the series, by an unknown writer.

Darkness Visible: Goya Prints from the Lunder Collection is organized to coincide with an exhibition of the work of Nancy Spero (1926–2009), one of many artists who have been inspired by Goya’s visionary creations as a graphic artist.

 

Nancy Spero, Liberty – Athlete, 1995. Handprinting and printed collage on paper, 24 1⁄2 x 38 1⁄2 in.

 

Nancy Spero: Unbound
For more than five decades, Nancy Spero (1926–2009) pioneered a feminist art practice that fiercely defied the social expectations imposed on women. Using a lexicon of appropriated imagery, Spero envisioned, as she observed in 1987, “all manner of processions, conflicts, interruptions and disruptions.” Her hybrid artworks made in protest against war and in celebration of the liberated female body constitute Nancy Spero: Unbound, an exhibition organized in conjunction with a concurrent presentation of Francisco Goya’s prints, which Spero first encountered as an aspiring young artist.

Spanning the artist’s entire career, Nancy Spero: Unbound includes one of her earliest surviving works: a lithograph dating from around 1950, depicting an ecstatic dancer whose outstretched limbs resist containment. In 1966, when Spero initiated a truculent series of drawings to protest the Vietnam War, she began to work primarily on and with paper, a material she preferred for its versatility and economy. She subsequently introduced the use of collaged images made from cutouts of her prints. She also joined paper sheets end to end to create vertical and horizontal scrolls, often composing on a monumental scale.

The expressions of ecstasy and protest that defined Spero’s early practice gave way to representations of the female subject as an “activator” in works derived from found and altered images, sometimes with accompanying quotations. Late in life Spero explored her visual lexicon in new and even more expansive sites, drawing and printing directly on the wall and revisiting her Vietnam War–era imagery to create one of her last major works, Maypole: Take No Prisoners II (2008), a towering, multi-part sculpture that serves as the exhibition’s arresting centerpiece.

CMCA exhibition features work by Artist Heather Lyon

Heather Lyon, Wrap, 2017, video still

Heather Lyon, Wrap, 2017, video still

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA) invites the public to the exhibition, Materiality: The Matter of Matter, on view at CMCA through February 11, 2018.

Lyon (b. 1975) is a sculptor and performance artist who works with unlikely materials ranging from rebar to sequins to milk. She received her MFA and BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and currently teaches at the Blue Hill Harbor School. She has shown at numerous galleries in Chicago, Nantes (France), and Maine, and has attended residencies at the Vermont Studio Center and at Atelier Alain LeBras in France, as well as workshops at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, Ox-Bow Artist’s Colony in Michigan, and the Burren College of Art in Ireland. She recently returned from Tbilisi, Georgia, where she was invited to exhibit and perform new work at the Georgian National Museum.

Heather Lyon, Roll, 2017, video still

Heather Lyon, Roll, 2017, video still

Her recent work on view at CMCA is Milk, Roll, Wrap, a series of task-based performance videos that question the ways we negotiate longing, loss, desire, power, and vulnerability.

For more information on the exhibition, Materiality: The Matter of Matter, visit cmcanow.org.

February 4 – ArtLab for All Ages | Lost & Found with Fiber and Found Objects

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The Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA) invites artists of all ages to February’s ArtLab. Join ArtLab instructor Alexis Iammarino in transforming found materials into elegant wall hangings using fiber and found objects. Bring your friends, your family, or come by yourself on Saturday, February 4, from 2-4 pm at the new CMCA, located at 21 Winter Street, Rockland. ArtLab welcomes children, teens, adults, and families, and is free of charge and open to all. Found objects will be provided, but feel free to bring your own!

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CMCA’s Saturday afternoon ArtLabs are led by interdisciplinary artist/educator Alexis Iammarino. Alexis received her Masters in Community Art from Maryland Institute College of Art, and is also a member and educator at Steel House in Rockland.

ArtLab is supported in part by the Milton and Sally Avery Art Foundation, Davis Family Foundation, Reny Foundation, Margaret E. Burnham Trust, and individual donors.