Archive for Ellsworth

Courthouse Gallery Fine Art presents Jessica Lee Ives: Watermark

Jessica Lee Ives: Watermark, 2017, oil on panel, 24 x 48 inches

Jessica Lee Ives: Watermark, 2017, oil on panel, 24 x 48 inches

Courthouse Gallery Fine Art is pleased to present Jessica Lee Ives: Watermark, the
gallery’s first solo show for Ives. The show opens on Friday, September 15, with an artist
reception from 5–6pm, and an artist talk at 6pm. The show runs through October 28. The event is
free and open to the public.

Jessica Lee Ives: WaterForm, 2017, oil on panel, 18 x 18 inches

Jessica Lee Ives: WaterForm, 2017, oil on panel, 18 x 18 inches

In her most recent series, Ives explores the figure as it moves through water—at the surface,
below, and looking down from above—creating colorful ripples or exploding above a swimmer’s
head like a jeweled headdress. These contemporary figures, combined with her exquisite
portrayal of water, make Ives’ paintings fresh, exciting, and relevant.

Jessica Lee Ives: Humanity of the Body, 2017, oil on panel, 6 x 6 inches

Jessica Lee Ives: Humanity of the Body, 2017, oil on panel, 6 x 6 inches

Courthouse Gallery is located at 6 Court Street in Ellsworth. Hours: Tuesday–Saturday 10am–
5pm. For more information on upcoming shows call 207-667-6611, or visit
www.courthousegallery.com

Jessica Lee Ives: Embody, 2017, oil on panel, 18 x 18 inches

Jessica Lee Ives: Embody, 2017, oil on panel, 18 x 18 inches

Artist’s Talk Janice Anthony & Alison Rector at Courthouse Gallery

Anthony, Entrance, 28x30

Anthony, Entrance, 28×30

Courthouse Gallery Fine Art will host an Artist’s Talk for Janice Anthony and Alison Rector on Wednesday, September 6 at 6pm. Rector (interiors) and Anthony (landscapes) will talk about their work and how they create the illusion of light through the manipulation of an opaque material (paint) on a two-dimensional surface. The talk is free and open to the public.

Janice Anthony

Janice Anthony

Their work is currently in How the Light Gets In, a two-person show at Courthouse Gallery. Anthony and Rector found apt inspiration for this show in the lyrics of Leonard Cohen, the late great singer, songwriter, and poet. In his song Anthem, Cohen wrote:

Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
That’s how the light gets in

Cohen was speaking about more than the physical properties of light in Anthem. He was addressing life and political unrest. The sadness and wisdom of his words are mighty. Humans are flawed. There is a crack in everything. For Anthony and Rector, light is their glimpse into an overlooked quiet space, the hidden mysteries of a cool hollow, or the extraordinary colors of pebbled beach—a reminder to look for the beauty in, and beyond, the crack.

Alison Rector

Alison Rector

Courthouse Gallery is located at 6 Court Street in Ellsworth. Hours: Monday–Saturday 10am–5:30pm; Sunday 12–4pm. For more information on upcoming shows call 207-667-6611, or visit www.courthousegallery.com

Courthouse Gallery Fine Art Announces New Exhibitions

JANICE ANTHONY  Cobble Beach, Schoodic, acrylic on canvas, 14 x 36 inches

JANICE ANTHONY Cobble Beach, Schoodic, acrylic on canvas, 14 x 36 inches

Courthouse Gallery Fine Art is pleased to present a two-person exhibition: Janice Anthony and Alison Rector: How the Light Gets In, and solo shows of new work by Ragna Bruno, Rosie Moore, and Colin Page from August 16– September 12. The exhibitions are free and open to the public.

Janice Anthony and Alison Rector: How the Light Get’s In
Janice Anthony (landscapes) and Alison Rector (interiors) spend their days contemplating the illusion of light. They study how light gives form to an interior space as it moves across a room through windows and doors, or how shafts of light illuminate the ferns and wild plants that flourish below an impenetrable canopy of trees.

Anthony and Rector found apt inspiration for this show in the lyrics of a song by Leonard Cohen, the late great singer, songwriter, and poet. In his song Anthem, Cohen wrote:

Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
That’s how the light gets in

Cohen was speaking about more than the physical properties of light in Anthem. He was addressing life and political unrest. The sadness and wisdom of his words are mighty. Humans are flawed. There is a crack in everything.

ALISON RECTOR  The Fragrance of Afternoon, oil on linen, 28 x 28 inches

ALISON RECTOR The Fragrance of Afternoon, oil on linen, 28 x 28 inches

In painting, the illusion of light is derived from the manipulation of an opaque material (paint) on a flat two-dimensions surface. Both painters transformed these benign materials into remarkable works of art brimming with mood and emotion. For Anthony and Rector, light is their glimpse into an overlooked quiet space, the hidden mysteries of a cool hollow, or the extraordinary colors of pebbled beach —a reminder to look for the beauty in, and beyond, the crack.

Courthouse Gallery is located at 6 Court Street in Ellsworth. Hours: Monday–Saturday 10am–5:30pm; Sunday 12–4pm. For more information on upcoming shows call 207-667-6611, or visit www.courthousegallery.com

Jeffery Becton’s Montages at Courthouse Gallery and on National Tour

Jeffery Becton: Off Spirit Ledge, 2017, digital montage, 25 x 78 inches

Jeffery Becton: Off Spirit Ledge, 2017, digital montage, 25 x 78 inches

Ellsworth Courthouse Gallery is currently showing new work by Jeffery Becton through August 13, including several of his large-format digital montages. In addition, Becton’s over-sized montages are currently traveling in a national exhibition hosted by Bates College Museum of Art. The tour began at a solo exhibition at Bates in November 2015, and has since traveled to the University of Tennessee, the Vero Beach Museum of Art in Florida, and will open in Virginia at Lynchburg College on August 29.

“What I especially enjoy about Becton’s touch is that he doesn’t try to hide his Photoshop tracks (layers, cutout marks, filters – particularly Photoshop’s “watercolor” filter – etc.) just as many painters don’t try to hide their brushwork. . . . This is an important facet of Becton’s work: It is not simple conceptualism driven by one-dimensional wit. Becton follows his ideas with depth. . . . While the show includes a few (quite beautiful) black and white images, they underscore Becton’s broad palette. Moreover, with this exhibition, Becton makes the case that he is arguably the best colorist in Maine in any medium.” — Daniel Kany, Maine Sunday Telegram, 2016

Jeffery Becton: Stage Door, 2017, digital montage, 20 x 30 inches

Jeffery Becton: Stage Door, 2017, digital montage, 20 x 30 inches

“As in the work of surrealists like René Magritte (who, by the way, championed photomontage way before Adobe made it cool), things may not be what they seem in Becton’s work, but they still possess an unsettling, ambiguous familiarity. Erosion is a theme of both Becton’s art and his process: nature eroding the manmade, the digital eroding the physical—each one as implacable as the waves of the Atlantic lapping at Deer Isle’s shores.” — Grace-Yvette Gemmell, Down East, 2015

Inspired by the tidal reaches and atmospheric weather near his Deer Isle home and the summer homes on the Blue Hill Peninsula, Becton creates provocative photo-based digital montages, often playing with the borders between dream and reality, interior and exterior, abstraction and representation. His montages frequently contain architectural elements and objects from these vintage New England houses, many of which are part of his personal history.

Jeffery Becton: Alarm, 2017, digital montage, 20 x 33 inches

Jeffery Becton: Alarm, 2017, digital montage, 20 x 33 inches

Becton’s work has been in numerous solo, group, and juried exhibitions, featured in national and international publications, and is included in many private and museum collections, including Bates College of Art, Farnsworth Museum of Art, and Portland Museum of Art, among others. Becton’s work is also highlighted in “Jeffery Becton: The Farthest House” (Marshall Wilkes), a recent monograph by Carl Little. Signed copies of the book are available at Courthouse Gallery.

Courthouse Gallery is located at 6 Court Street in Ellsworth. Hours: Monday–Saturday 10am–5:30pm; Sunday 12–4pm. For more information on upcoming shows call 207-667-6611, or visit www.courthousegallery.com

Courthouse Gallery presents Philip Barter: Maine Oasis and Judith Leighton Retrospective in July

 

Philip Barter: Oasis 8, 2017, acrylic on linen, 36 x 48 inches

Philip Barter: Oasis 8, 2017, acrylic on linen, 36 x 48 inches

Courthouse Gallery Fine Art is pleased to present two solo exhibitions—Philip Barter: Maine Oasis and Judith Leighton Restrospective—from June 21 through July 20. Also showing are Susan Amons, Judy Belasco, Philip Koch, Mark Kidschi, and Stephen Porter. The exhibitions are free and open to the public.

 

Philip Barter: Maine Oasis

Philip Barter (b.1939) is a self-taught artist from Boothbay, Maine, who was living in California during the 1960s when he met Alfonso Sosa, an abstract expressionist painter. Sosa took Barter under his wing and added a “charge of light and color” to Barter’s aesthetic vision that influenced his work for the next fifty years. Barter has spent a half-century painting narratives based on the Maine’s fiercely independent people and the landscape of his home state, becoming the “painter laureate” of the region. Barter was the subject of a feature profile in Down East magazine and went national when, in January 1995, Tim Sample highlighted his life in art in one of his “Postcards from Maine” segments on the CBS Sunday Morning program hosted by Charles Kuralt.

Top Left: Carl Little (Photo by Erin Little), Top Right: Philip Barter, Bottom: Book Jacket

Top Left: Carl Little (Photo by Erin Little), Top Right: Philip

 

In conjunction with the show Philip Barter: Maine Oasis, Courthouse Gallery will host a Book Launch and Signing on July 12 from 4–7pm for Philip Barter: Forever Maine, a new book by Carl Little (Marshall Wilkes). At 5:30pm Little will introduce Philip Barter, who will talk about his narrative paintings, process, and career. The author will be available for book signing. Books can be reserved by calling (207) 667-6611. The event is free and open to the public.

 

Judith Leighton: Protection, 2007, pastel, 27 x 21 inches

Judith Leighton: Protection, 2007, pastel, 27 x 21 inches

Judith Leighton Retrospective

Judith Leighton (1929–2011) was the former owner of the Leighton Gallery in Blue Hill and an artist in her own right.  She began painting with watercolors in the 1950s, gaining notice for her work by the 1960s. After moving to Maine in 1970, Leighton worked almost exclusively with dry pastels.Her modernist inspired motifs included flowers, landscapes, tables and chairs, and women, often seated as if engaged in an pleasant conversation, or standing, or holding a dog, cat or bird. Leighton was passionate about art that “celebrated life” whether it was the art she showed at her gallery, or the art she made.

 

Courthouse Gallery is located at 6 Court Street in Ellsworth. Hours: Monday–Saturday 10am– 5:30pm; Sunday 12–4pm. For more information on upcoming shows call 207-667-6611, or visit www.courthousegallery.com

Irene Eilers Joins Courthouse Gallery Team

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Karin and Michael Wilkes are pleased to announce they have hired Irene Eilers to be the assistant manager and sales associate at Courthouse Gallery Fine Art. Ms. Eilers brings a wealth of gallery experience to Courthouse. She got her start with the late Judith Leighton, a pioneer Maine gallerist and the owner of the former Leighton Gallery in Blue Hill. After Leighton’s death in 2011, Eilers managed gWatson Gallery in Stonington.

Ms. Eilers’s debut at Courthouse Gallery will coincide with the opening of a resptropective for Judith Leighton. “It’s like coming full circle” Irene recently mused. The Wilkeses, who represent the Leighton estate, said this will be their first showing of Leighton’s engaging pastels. The show, which opens June 21, will run in conjunction with a solo show for painter Philip Barter, who showed at the Leighton Gallery in the early days.

 Ms. Eilers holds a comprehensive degree in Interior Design (BA) from the University of Washington, Seattle. However, she always wanted to make pottery, and began her journey as a potter in South Africa through an apprenticeship with the late Hym Rabinowitz. After returning to the U.S., Eilers continued to hone her craft through master workshops at the Vermont State Craft Center where she worked as the studio assistant for their programs and taught children’s pottery classes. Eilers eventually set up her own studio as the resident potter at a Vermont country inn. Her work, which was highly decorated terracotta, won the jurors award at the Stratton Art’s Festival. Eilers was also commissioned by the Vermont Council on the Arts to make their awards, consisting of 60 platters. After moving to Maine, Eilers became a member of the Brooklin Pottery Co-op. She lives in Sedgwick.

 Courthouse Gallery is located at 6 Court Street in Ellsworth. For more information on upcoming shows call 667-6611, or visit www.courthousegallery.com

New Art Show at the Wine Cellar Art Gallery downstairs at John Edwards Market

Credits - Provincetown Tanager, By Brian Emerson; Downeast Icons, by Matthew Barter; Squirrel by Brent Ander

Credits – Provincetown Tanager, By Brian Emerson; Downeast Icons, by Matthew Barter; Squirrel by Brent Ander

 

For the months of April & May, we are very happy to host the works of Matthew Barter, Brian Emerson, & Brent Anders.

We welcome Matt Barter, currently of Richmond, Maine. Matt is showing paintings on board and canvas. These pieces focus on iconic Downeast images and the stories of the people who live here told in bold, bright colors and a homegrown primitive style. We are so glad to hang his work.

We are very happily showing new works by Brian Emerson of Portland. Brian’s paintings on board and canvas pop with an exuberant abstract style that sings the joy of the moment. Reflective garden discoveries and seaside musings are portrayed with seemingly carefree strokes and saturated colors. We love supporting Brian’s work.

Brent Anders is an artist new to the Wine Cellar Gallery, and we are excited to host his work. Brent resides in our own fair Ellsworth. His pieces are exacted with such realism, one is impelled to step closer for a better look. Maine wildlife and classically illustrated lighthouses are rendered with colored pencil, pastels, & watercolors. We are delighted to welcome Brent to our gallery.

An opening of this show is planned in conjunction with a wine tasting for Friday, May 5th, from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Please join us.

Please visit the Wine Cellar Art Gallery. We are open daily. Contact 207-667-9377 or johnedwardsmarket.com

Wine Cellar Art Gallery opening Dec. 2

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The paintings on the card are: Maine Sparkle by Paul Breeden Mother Loon & Chicks by Ann Breeden Birch Harbor Huckleberry Patch by Jeff DiBella

 

The Wine Cellar Art Gallery downstairs at John Edwards Market is delighted to host the work of three local artists – painters/illustrators Paul & Ann Breeden & photographer Jeff DiBella

Paul Breeden has been a professional artist for over 50 years working as an illustrator, botanical artist, painter & calligrapher with works featured in National Geographic, Audubon, Sierra, World, & Smithsonian among other numerous magazines. He illustrated Peter Jenkins’ book, A Walk Across America and all 24 volumes of Time-Life Books’, Lost Civilizations. Now Paul devotes his energy, expertise, & imagination to the fine arts including colorful works in acrylics, water media, wood sculpture, & photography. “I really love painting the rugged beauty of coastal Maine – the power of the sea, the textures of the rocky shore, lighthouses, old farms, and tall spruces against the luminous sky. Nothing makes me happier than a person connecting with and falling in love with one of my works.”

Ann Breeden spent five years studying art under the tutelage of Helen Murthy at the Berkshire Art Museum and with Jean Lewis in Zuni, New Mexico, again studying art as well as Native American Culture. Her paintings have been shown in numerous galleries, universities, colleges, & festivals in various states across the country. “As an artist, I’ve always strived to capture the light and line of my natural surroundings, trying to bring the passion and love that I feel for that fleeting moment when Mother Nature and my imagination meet in harmony.”

Jeff DiBella’s photography focuses on landscapes and birds. Inspired in his teens by the great Ansel Adams and Eliot Porter of Maine, Jeff recently moved to Maine after living in Connecticut most of his life. Relocating to Maine allows him to enjoy his love of the natural world, especially birds in flight, and provides him enough subject matter for a lifetime. He tries to present his viewers with images of nature they might not otherwise get the chance to see.  Jeff’s black-and-white work on Snowy Owls of Acadia was featured all summer at MDI Biolabs’ “Art meets Science” exhibit for the celebrated 100th birthday of Acadia National Park. When not in the field, Jeff teaches basic photography at Sullivan Adult Education. “I’m lucky to be surrounded by great photographers and naturalists in this area who have been generous with their knowledge and expertise. They are my new inspiration!”

This show will be available through the month of January. An opening of this show at the gallery is planned for December 2nd.  Please visit the Wine Cellar Art Gallery. We are open daily. Contact us at 207-667-9377 or johnedwardsmarket.com

Wine Cellar Art Gallery showing Jill Hoy and Kathleen Noyes

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White Bird by Kathleen Noyes, on the right is Brenda’s by Jill Hoy.

 

The Wine Cellar Art Gallery downstairs at John Edwards Market in Ellsworth is currently showing works by artists Jill Hoy and Kathleen Noyes. This show will be available through November. Come and see!

Jill Hoy divides her time among residences in Stonington, Maine; Somerville, Massachusetts; and New York City. The work she creates in Maine is inspired by direct observation of the landscape and includes seascapes, architecture, and gardens.

Working on location, Jill is especially interested in the effects of natural light, color, and pattern. Her use of vivid color in the Maine paintings results in surfaces that are richly and intensely painted so that images seem to vibrate. The artist considers the quality of light to be an important element in her work. “The light in Maine is crystal clear, with a sharp-edged clarity and a gem-like quality. I often work in the morning or late afternoon when these qualities are especially strong.” As a result, her paintings capture specifics of time and light.   Because she’s been a regular resident of the Deer Isle area since 1965, much of Jill’s work can be seen as a document of places and time in the area.

 

As an artist Kathleen Noyes explores the dynamic of innocence and darkness in human life through her figurative work. There is always a certain, deeply-held dark knowledge behind the new eyes and expression of wonder in her figures. The interplay of the light and shadow side of consciousness is expressed at once in her human forms. Kathleen’s intention is for the viewer to feel but have trouble naming what the subject feels. She leaves it to the audience to interpret the significance of emotion in her work.

In creating her collage and mixed media abstracts, Kathleen likens the process to experiencing the spontaneous and serendipitous happenings in life; the unforeseen materializes as she cements the pieces together.

 

FMI  207-667-9377 or  johnedwardsmarket.com

The Wine Cellar Gallery at John Edwards Market shows works by several Maine artists

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The Wine Cellar Gallery downstairs at John Edwards Market in Ellsworth is currently showing works by artists Valera Crofoot and Sember Lockwood as well as several other Maine artists.

Valera Crofoot is a studio painter who works in oil on canvas. Her paintings are a response to her perceptions of what she observes in the world as she travels from the coastline of Maine and Canada to seas beyond. We are happy to host her colorful and vibrant depictions of coastal imagery.

Artist Sember Lockwood embraces art in myriad forms from paint and other graphic expressions to textiles, sculpture, and interior design. We are delighted to hang her whimsical portraits of woodland and garden fairies done with watercolors on paper.

This show will be available through September. Please visit the Wine Cellar Art Gallery.  Open daily. 207-667-9377 or  johnedwardsmarket.com

Slide Show Talk and Book Signing with Carl Little at Courthouse Gallery

artofacadia_fcEllsworth Author Carl Little will present a slide show at Courthouse Gallery on Wednesday, August 10 at 6pm, on Art of Acadia, a newly released book by Carl Little and David Little, published by Down East Books. This beautiful book of American art history honors the region in celebration of Acadia. The event is being held in conjunction with 10/100 Painting Acadia, a group exhibition celebrating the Gallery’s tenth anniversary and the Acadia National Park centennial. The book will be available for purchase at the talk. The event is free and open to the public.

This beautiful book spans the seventeenth century through the twentyfirst, and includes a variety of work, from fine art to art that appeared in guidebooks, travelogues, and posters to its current Artist-in-Residence program. It is a view of the region that grants a new perspective to our collective appreciation of this unique convergence of land and sea.

About the authors: David Little, a resident of Portland, Maine, has been painting the Maine landscape since 1983. His work has been included in exhibitions at the Blaine House, Bates College Museum of Art, and the Farnsworth Museum, and he spent ten years working at the Bayview Gallery in Portland, and he gives critiques, juries art shows, and curates.

Carl Little is the author of more than a dozen art books, including The Watercolors of John Singer Sargent, Edward Hopper’s New England, and The Art of Dahlov Ipcar. He has also published articles and reviews of art in such magazines as Art in America, Art New England and Down East. He serves as the director of marketing and communication at the Maine Community Foundation and he lives on Mount Desert Island, Maine.

For more information contact:
Courthouse Gallery Fine Art
6 Court Street
Ellsworth, Maine 04605

207 667 6611
www.courthousegallery.com

Courthouse Gallery Celebrates 10th Anniversary

David Vickery, Moore's Harbor-Isle Au Haut, 2016, oil on panel, 20 x 48 inches

David Vickery, Moore’s Harbor-Isle Au Haut, 2016, oil on panel, 20 x 48 inches

 Courthouse Gallery Fine Art in Ellsworth is pleased to present 10/100 Painting Acadia and Tom Blagden PhotographyWilliam Irvine: Sea Change, and sculpture by Kazumi Hoshino and Stephen Porter. The shows will be on view from July 20–August 13. The exhibitions are free and open to the public.

Karin and Michael Wilkes founded Courthouse Gallery Fine Art in 2006 with a mission to present high-quality works of art through curated exhibitions and special events. The gallery is housed in Ellsworth’s historic courthouse and registry of deeds, two beautifully restored 1830s Greek revival buildings offering over 4500 square feet of exhibition space. The combination of this historic site and the ability to exhibit a wide range of artistic styles in a spacious gallery has made Courthouse Gallery Fine Art a destination for art collectors statewide and beyond. A large-scale sculpture park occupies the sweeping lawn out front.

 10/100 Painting Acadia celebrates Courthouse Gallery’s 10th Anniversary and the Acadia National Park Centennial. This group show highlights a range of dynamic Acadia imagery using oils, acrylics, casein, montages, and photography by gallery and guest artists. In addition to 10/100, photography of Acadia by renowned nature photographer Tom Blagden will also be on view. Blagden’s photographs are the subject of Acadia National Park: A Centennial Celebration, a newly released book celebrating the Park’s centennial.

Gretna Campbell, Back Shore, 1985, oil on canvas, 42 x 48 inches

Gretna Campbell, Back Shore, 1985, oil on canvas, 42 x 48 inches

10/100 participating artists include Susan Amons, Janice Anthony, Scott Baltz, Siri Beckman, Jeffery Becton, Judy Belasco, Alan Bray, Ragna Bruno, Gretna Campbell, Dorothy Eisner, Lisa Tyson Ennis, Philip Frey, June Grey, Francis Hamabe, Paul Hannon, Jessica Lee Ives, Joseph Keiffer, Philip Koch, Rosie Moore, Emily Muir, Ed Nadeau, John Neville, Linda Packard, Colin Page, Cynthia Stroud, Lilian Day Thorpe, Wendy Turner, David Vickery, Alan Vlach.

William Irvine, The Darkening Sky, oil on canvas, 24 x 30 inches

William Irvine, The Darkening Sky, oil on canvas, 24 x 30 inches

 William Irvine: Sea Change This solo exhibition includes a number of William Irvine’s seascapes for which he is best known, as well as a number of his enchanting paintings of women and fishermen and the small white houses where they live by the sea. Irvine, who has established himself as a Maine and American master, was born and raised in Troon, a small coastal village in Scotland. After graduating from the Glasgow School of Art and serving in the Scottish army, Irvine moved to London where he became part of the avant-garde art scene. In 1968, Irvine moved to downeast Maine. Here, Irvine was struck by the brilliance of the Maine light, the beauty of the ocean and islands, and the lives of the people who make their living from the sea. William Irvine: A Painter’s Journey, a hard cover book on the artist’s career released in 2014, will be available as well as a catalog from the Sea Change. Irvine lives his wife Marge and Tam, Shetland sheepdog, in Brooklin, Maine.

For more information please visit www.courthousegallery.com.

Courthouse Gallery presents “Philip Frey: Unexpected Light,” Geoff Smith: Sculpture

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Philip Frey, Structural Harmony, oil on canvas, 30 x 40 inches

Courthouse Gallery Fine Art in Ellsworth is pleased to present three exhibitions: Philip Frey: Unexpected Light, Geoff Smith Sculpture, and New Work by Jeffery Becton, Ragna Bruno, John Neville. The shows will be on view from June 22–July 16. The exhibitions are free and open to the public.

The solo exhibition Unexpected Light marks the tenth year Philip Frey has been represented by Courthouse Gallery. Owners Karin and Michael are delighted to have worked with Philip these past ten years and look forward to many more. “People are drawn to his vibrant colors and brushwork,” said director Karin Wilkes. Collectors Weslie Janeway and William Janeway, who contributed to the exhibition catalog, said the following about Frey’s work:

“Phil’s work balances between abstraction and recognizable image. Shadow and light, water and land, a command of color across an extraordinary range of shades combine to express the experience of the Downeast coast of Maine and beyond that specificity, the experience of living at the intersection of sky and sea and earth.  His ability to reveal the organic, physical source of the images that inspire him through structured forms is compelling.”

Frey studied painting at the Columbus College of Art and Design, printmaking at the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, and holds a BFA from Syracuse University. He has received several grants and awards, including the Heliker-LaHotan Foundation Residency in 2012, and his work can be found in private and corporate collections nationwide and abroad. In 2016, Frey’s work will be the subject of a solo exhibition at the University of Maine Museum of Art.

 

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Geoff Smith, Bones, 1988, Fiberglass sculpture on granite base,

Geoff Smith (1940–2009), who summered on Deer Isle for twenty years, made sculpture non-stop during his forty-year career. He is best known for his large-scale, curvilinear, and abstract sculptures, several of which are included in this show. Smith’s work was exhibited, collected, and commissioned for private collections, public exhibitions, major corporations and art institutions in more than fifteen states across the nation. Smith worked in a variety of media, including steel, stone, wood, fiberglass, clay and bronze. During his long career, he lived and worked in studios in Vermont, Philadelphia, Virginia, Maine, and Kentucky. Smith graduated from the University of Vermont with a Master of Arts degree in 1969.

Courthouse Gallery Artist’s Talk with Jessica Lee Ives

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Jessica Lee Ives, “Moving Meditation,” oil on panel, 10 x 22 inches

Courthouse Gallery Fine Art in Ellsworth will host an Artist’s Talk for Jessica Lee Ives on Friday May 27 at 4pm. Ives will speak about her work and how the following philosophies influence her personal and artistic life: kinesthetic intelligence and imagination, mirror neurons firing in the brain, and the healing properties of water. The event is free and open to the public.

Ives’ work is currently included in Fire and Water: Janice Anthony and Jessica Lee Ives, a two-person exhibition that explores each artist’s interpretation of two opposing natural elements. The shows will be on view from May 20–June 18. There will be an artist’s reception immediately following the talk.

In 2016, Swans Island Company released Water Colors, a special edition throw, which is being presented in collaboration with Ives, who created The Colors of Water, an original painting inspired by this throw. The throw and prints will be available at the gallery talk.

Ives uses paint to explore and experience her adventure filled relationship with the landscape of Maine, her home state, and beyond. Ives paints out of love—love for the world, and for the capacity of humans to know the world through movement, recreation, and adventure. Kinesthetic intelligence and imagination form the foundation of her personal and artistic life. Ives is astounded by how a small brush stroke can capture a large body moving through water, and how these actions describe the world’s beauty.

Ives received her BFA from The Cooper Union School of Art. She was named one of the Top Ten College Women of 2003 by Glamour Magazine. Ives was awarded the Clark Foundation Fellowship for her work as an artist-in-residence at Ground Zero. She used the fellowship to pursue a master’s degree at New York University, combining work in the fields of art, religion, and public service.