Archive for Portland Museum of Art

Portland Museum of Art Announces Free Admission for Everyone 21 Years Old and Under

The Portland Museum of Art is proud to announce that it is changing its admission policy to offer free, unlimited admission to everyone age 21 and under beginning on April 11, 2018, opening the museum’s doors in perpetuity to teens and youth everywhere. The program is made possible through the vision and generosity of Susie Konkel, a leading philanthropist and advocate for youth in Maine and the region, and will include other benefits, all named in her honor as the Susie Konkel Pass.

All visitors age 21 and under will receive free admission automatically when they visit the PMA, but young people or their guardians can also increase their level of engagement by signing up for the Susie Konkel Pass, which will provide the holder opportunities to attend special events including select free screenings of PMA Films, ways to stay up to date on museum happenings, and more.

“I’m honored to work with the staff at the PMA to ensure that every child in the Maine community and throughout the world can feel the joy and wonder that comes from experiencing magnificent works of art,” shares Konkel. “It’s my hope that children, teens, and young adults alike will discover the many ways that art appreciation can enrich their lives, and also feel inspired and empowered to share their voices with the world. I’m incredibly gratified to help the PMA share its wonderful collection with children far and wide.”

The Susie Konkel Pass reflects the collective passion and dedication of the museum and Konkel to widely share the power of art to transform lives and offer all youth access to lasting arts experiences. Additionally, Konkel and the museum envision that removing admission costs will result in freedom at the PMA for young people and their families as a whole, including:

1. Freedom for teens and young adults to use the museum as a safe and inspirational hang-out spot, where they are always welcome, can enjoy arts experiences, and be themselves at any time.

2. Freedom for low-income families to explore the arts and culture in new and different ways, regardless of who they are, how they live, or the economic hurdles they face.

3. Freedom for college and university students to use the PMA as a place to study, relax, and engage with the community as young adults.

4. Freedom for new Mainers to immediately feel a part of their community, to feel represented and respected, and to express themselves in an inclusive environment.

5. Freedom for parents to have more opportunities to enrich their children’s lives, supplement their growth and education, and set them on the path for a lifetime of arts appreciation.

Each year, 11,000 visitors under the age of 21 visit the museum, either through existing relationships with the museum or by being charged admission. Buoyed by a nearly 20% increase in website traffic for visitors ages 18-24 over the past two years, an redesigned Winslow Homer High School Fellow program, Teen Nights at the museum, and collaborations with MECA and USM, the PMA began thinking about a new way to deepen the engagement of young adults.

Susie Konkel had long seen the PMA as a place to reset and recharge, and with the successful completion of Your Museum, Reimagined over this same time period, she was encouraged by the increasingly diverse base of visitors looking to the PMA as a cultural center that reflects their values and lifestyles, and serves their communities.

The PMA’s commitment to broadening its audiences and the people it serves has been a top priority in recent years, and the Susie Konkel Pass is a natural step in that progression. The museum has been looking to build upon a growing Family-level membership base, new family programs, and special events for children, and by offering free admission to all visitors 21 and under, the Susie Konkel Pass becomes the most recent of other transformative moments, programs, and events at the museum including Art for All, Free Fridays, 2017’s Your Museum, Reimagined and Lights Across Congress, and 2018’s Art in Bloom. Together, the PMA and Konkel hope to establish the PMA as an indispensable resource for future generations.

PMA BACKGROUND
With an extensive collection and nationally renowned exhibitions, the Portland Museum of Art (PMA) is the cultural heart of Maine. The PMA boasts significant holdings of American, European, and contemporary art, as well as iconic works from Maine—highlighting the rich artistic tradition of the state and its artists. The museum brings it all to life with unparalleled programming. From special events, Free School Tours, and a commitment to family activities, to PMA Films, curator talks, and exclusive tours of the Winslow Homer Studio—it’s all happening at the PMA.

The museum is located at Seven Congress Square in downtown Portland.
Summer Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Thursday and Friday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Winter Hours: Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Thursday and Friday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Admission is $15 for adults, $13 for seniors, and $10 for students with I.D.

There is always free admission for everyone age 21 and under, provided by the generosity of Susie Konkel.

Admission is free for all, every Friday from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

No admission is required to visit the PMA Café and PMA Store.

Winslow Homer Studio tours are available by reservation. For more information, call (207) 775-6148 or visit portlandmuseum.org.

Portland Museum of Art announces significant gift of works by Winslow Homer donated by the Berger Collection Educational Trust

Winslow Homer (United States, 1836–1910), Young Farmers (Study for Weaning the Calf), 1873–74, oil on canvas, 13 5/8 x 11 1/2 inches. Winslow Homer (United States, 1836 - 1910), Returning from the Spring, 1874, oil on panel, 7 7 /8 x 5 3/4 inches

Winslow Homer (United States, 1836–1910), Young Farmers (Study for Weaning the Calf), 1873–74, oil on canvas, 13 5/8 x 11 1/2 inches.
Winslow Homer (United States, 1836 – 1910), Returning from the Spring, 1874, oil on panel, 7 7 /8 x 5 3/4 inches

The PMA is thrilled to announce a major gift of works by American icon Winslow Homer through the incredible generosity of the Berger Collection Education Trust. This gift strengthens our position as one of the leading institutions in the world to experience the art and legacy of Winslow Homer.

“We are excited to welcome these works of art back to Maine. There is no better home for the works of Winslow Homer than in the region that meant so much to him.” – Mark Bessire, the Judy and Leonard Lauder Director

Click here to read more.

SEE THEM IN PERSON

You’re invited to a private viewing of this special acquisition
Saturday, February 17, at 11 a.m. or 2 p.m.

Reservations are required.
To R.S.V.P. contact Ashleigh Hill at (207) 494-5346 or ahill@portlandmuseum.org

Portland Museum of Art Opens “The Robbers: German Art In a Time of Crisis”

The Portland Museum of Art (PMA) opens The Robbers: German Art in a Time of Crisis today, February 23. The exhibition of 21 German prints executed between the World Wars highlights George Grosz’s 1922 lithographic suite The Robbers: Nine Lithographs on Maxims from Schiller’s “The Robbers” as well as artworks by other printmakers of the era, including Max Beckmann, Otto Dix, and Käthe Kollvitz. The works on display powerfully blend issues of history, politics, art, and national identity, provoking questions about who we are and what we value in ways that are as pertinent today as they were a century ago.

With the lithographic suite The Robbers: Nine Lithographs on Maxims from Schiller’s “The Robbers,” Grosz updated Friedrich Schiller’s iconic 1781 play of the same name, depicting the canonical story in the tumultuous climate of early 1920s Berlin in which he lived. With figures culled from the modern era, Grosz’s imagery suggests the vast social discord where the traumatic effects of the mechanized war, greed, industry, and poverty intersected to undermine national stability in the young Weimar Republic.

Grosz’s prints were part of a broader artistic culture in which other printmakers and theater directors produced modern interpretations of canonical of German literature, overtly politicizing the hallmarks of the nation’s cultural heritage. Their work, available to broad audiences through widely disseminated prints or stage performances, was a type of social intervention at a moment when conceptions of German identity vacillated wildly. The interplay between contemporaneous politics and historic literature highlighted the tensions between tradition and modernity, which strained German society and which remain continually resonant today across the world.

Many of the prints in this exhibition, including the Grosz series, represent a post-World War I aesthetic known as “New Objectivity.” Whereas German Expressionists of an earlier generation often depicted emotional responses to the modern condition, highlighting themes of angst, inner turmoil, and social alienation, the leaders of New Objectivity rooted their prints in a type of biting, provocative realism, often relying on satire and caricature. Because of their goals to be socially engaged artists shaping the national discourse, many of the artists working in these styles found the print medium to be especially efficient as prints could be disseminated more broadly than painting or sculpture.

The Robbers: German Art in a Time of Crisis, which opens in the centenary year of the end of World War I, turns our attention away from the conflict itself and towards the aftermath that defined the next two decades. These works, many of which are gifts to the PMA from David and Eva Bradford, add context to the social and artistic expression of the era and are equally probing in their evaluation of German society and national identity.

PMA to highlight intersectionality and inclusivity throughout 2018

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The PMA is committed to being an open, accessible, inclusive, and welcoming museum for all, and the exhibitions in 2018 reflect the full range of voices in our community and create experiences with art that strengthen our bonds and bring us together. In this spirit, 2018 exhibitions at the PMA highlight intersectionality and inclusivity in Maine.

Ann Buckwalter (United States, born 1987), The Republic of Hysteria (detail), 2017, Oil and gouache on paper, 91 x 92 inches. EX1.2018.21

Ann Buckwalter (United States, born 1987), The Republic of Hysteria (detail), 2017, Oil and gouache on paper, 91 x 92 inches. EX1.2018.21

The 2018 PMA Biennial
January 26 – June 3
Featuring more than 60 works by 25 participating artists, the Biennial highlights the diverse perspectives and interests of artists connected to Maine, and makes a powerful statement about art’s impact in this historical moment.

George Grosz (Germany, 1839–1959), "Lions and tigers nourish their young, ravens feast their brood on carrion... Series: The Robbers" (detail), 1922, Photolithograph on paper, 27 1/2 x 19 3/4 inches. Gift of David and Eva Bradford, 2002.53.6.5, Art © Estate of George Grosz/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

George Grosz (Germany, 1839–1959), “Lions and tigers nourish their young, ravens feast their brood on carrion… Series: The Robbers” (detail), 1922, Photolithograph on paper, 27 1/2 x 19 3/4 inches. Gift of David and Eva Bradford, 2002.53.6.5, Art © Estate of George Grosz/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

The Robbers:
German Art in a Time of Crisis
February 23 – July 15
Highlighting the complete portfolio of George Grosz’s 1922 The Robbers, this exhibition also includes provocative artworks by printmakers such as Max Beckmann, Otto Dix, and Käthe Kollwitz.

Image: Eliot Porter (United States, 1901-1990), "Apples, Great Spruce Head Island, Maine, 1942", dye transfer print, 15 15/16 x 12 1/8 inches. Gift of Maine Coast Heritage Trust, 2017.4.2

Image: Eliot Porter (United States, 1901-1990), “Apples, Great Spruce Head Island, Maine, 1942”, dye transfer print, 15 15/16 x 12 1/8 inches. Gift of Maine Coast Heritage Trust, 2017.4.2

Eliot Porter’s Nature
On view now through March 18
“Almost every photograph is about the external world, yet the work of few photographers has helped change that world. Eliot Porter helped alter both the medium and society. The extent of those changes now obscures the extent of his influence. “Eliot Porter’s Nature”…is a welcome reminder of just how exacting an artist he was.” – Boston Globe

Andy Warhol, Moonwalk, 1987

Andy Warhol, Moonwalk, 1987

Under Pressure:
Art from the 1980s
March 30 – August 10
A cross-section of diverse 1980’s aesthetics, revealing varied visual ways that the artists of this decade shaped and reflected the rapidly changing artistic and social realities of the time.

Ashley Bryan (United States, born 1923), "The birds' colors were mirrored in the waters," circa 2002, from "Beautiful Blackbird," collage of cut colored paper on paper, 11 5/16 x 20 inches. The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, Amherst, Massachusetts.

Ashley Bryan (United States, born 1923), “The birds’ colors were mirrored in the waters,” circa 2002, from “Beautiful Blackbird,” collage of cut colored paper on paper, 11 5/16 x 20 inches. The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, Amherst, Massachusetts.

Painter and Poet: The Art of Ashley Bryan

August 3 – November 25
Bryan has committed himself to filling the void of black representation in children’s literature by creating books about African and African American experiences. This exhibition highlights the breadth of the Maine-based artist and author’s creative output.

Winslow Homer - Looking out to Sea, Cullercoats (1882)

Winslow Homer – Looking out to Sea, Cullercoats (1882)

Americans Abroad
August 17 – TBD
Composed of magnificent works by artists such as Winslow Homer, John Singer Sargent, Mary Cassatt, and others, Americans Abroad will examine watercolors, prints, and paintings by American artists who traveled to Europe for training and inspiration in the late 19th century.

Clarence H. White (United States, 1871–1925), Drops of Rain [Dew Drops] (detail), 1902, platinum print, 20.2 x 14.9 cm. Library of Congress

Clarence H. White (United States, 1871–1925), Drops of Rain [Dew Drops] (detail), 1902, platinum print, 20.2 x 14.9 cm. Library of Congress

Clarence White and His World: The Art and Craft of Photography, 1895–1925

June 22 – September 16
This exhibition is the first in over 40 years to survey the work of Clarence White (United States, 1871–1925), a founding member of the Photo-Secession, a gifted photographer known for his beautiful scenes of quiet domesticity and outdoor idylls, and a major teacher and mentor. It will survey White’s career from its beginnings in 1895 in Newark, Ohio, to his death in Mexico in 1925.

Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988)

Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988)

Beyond the Pedestal: Isamu Noguchi and the Borders of Sculpture
October 5 – January 6, 2019
Japanese-American modernist Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988) reimagined the possibilities of sculpture as he experimented endlessly with the intersection of objects, people, and space over the course of his 60-year career. Beyond the Pedestal: Isamu Noguchi and the Borders of Sculpture examines Noguchi’s expansive artistic practice, and through approximately 40 sculptures and 10 works on paper, encourages visitors to to ask fundamental questions about what defines our understanding of sculpture. In addition to reflecting the myriad ways in which Noguchi self-consciously crossed modes of production, brought together artistic and philosophical ideas from across the globe, and played with form and function, Beyond the Pedestal also focuses on the ways in which he engaged with causes of social justice, forming a thorough examination not only of the renowned artist’s perspective on sculpture, but on the world itself.

For more information please visit www.portlandmuseum.org

Nan Goldin’s Seminal Artwork Returns to New England

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The Portland Museum of Art is proud to host the first New England installation of Nan Goldin’s The Ballad of Sexual Dependency in more than 30 years. This seminal slideshow installation, considered one of the great works of art of the late 20th century, last exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City in 2016. The Portland Museum of Art exhibition marks the first time the Massachusetts-born artist has shown the work in New England since 1985, when it exhibited at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston.

The Ballad of Sexual Dependency—named for a song in Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill’s 1928 The Threepenny Opera—comprises nearly 700 photographs taken by Goldin of herself and her friends throughout Provincetown, Boston, New York, Berlin, and Mexico. In creating this diaristic account of her life throughout the 1970s and ’80s, a kaleidoscopic narrative of romantic longing, loss, intimacy, and breakups emerges, featuring both heterosexual and same-sex couples in raw, vivid honesty. In her own words, the work is about “creating a history by recording a history.”

The photography of Nan Goldin offers audiences a kaleidoscopic narrative of the breadth of the human experience. Beginning in the 1970s and continuing to the present, Goldin captures her world as it unfolds before her, resulting in a diaristic account of her life and the people and places that define it. Treating her camera as an extension of her own body, “creating a history by recording a history,” Goldin shields her memories from revision or erasure by preserving them permanently in photographic form. The result is an unvarnished, intimate, and honest glimpse into a full and nuanced life that has played out in New York City, Boston, Provincetown, and abroad, against the backdrops of nightclubs and drag bars, hotel rooms and hospitals, and more.

Organized by the Portland Museum of Art, Nan Goldin explores American artist Nan Goldin’s (b. 1953) use of photography as a means of communication, self-reflection, and poetic expression. For more information, call (207) 775-6148 or visit portlandmuseum.org.

2017 Bernard Osher Lecture “Keeping Tradition Alive” at the PMA

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The Portland Museum of Art is excited to announce Theresa Secord as the 2017 Bernard Osher Lecture speaker. The event, titled Keeping Tradition Alive: Native American Art Ecology in Maine and the Nation, will take place at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, September 12, at USM’s Hannaford Hall. Tickets are $15, $10 for PMA members, and $5 for students. They are available here and through portlandmuseum.org.

Named a 2016 National Heritage Fellow by the National Endowment for the Arts, Theresa Secord is an activist, arts preservationist, and renowned artist with work in the PMA collection. She has led creative change throughout Native American communities since 1988.

It wasn’t long ago that one of Maine’s oldest art forms—ash and sweet grass basketry—was in danger of disappearing entirely. Activists and advocates from the Passamaquoddy, Penobscot, Maliseet, and Micmac tribes, led in part by Secord, saved the tradition through a long, hard-fought struggle, preserving a crucial piece of the region’s cultural heritage.

For more information, visit portlandmuseum.org.

2018 PMA Biennial Curator Shares Exhibition Strategy

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Nat May, the independent curator of the 2018 PMA Biennial, has assembled a team of arts professionals to co-curate the exhibition, which opens at the Portland Museum of Art on January 26, 2018. Together with May, this team will share knowledge, discuss themes, and ultimately select the artists that will appear in the PMA’s hallmark exhibition of contemporary art related to Maine.

The team members are:
· Theresa Secord, renowned artist, educator, and founder of the Maine Indian Basketmakers Alliance
· Sarah Workneh, Co-Director of Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture
· Mark Bessire, the Judy and Leonard Lauder Director of the Portland Museum of Art

The idea of bringing people together to share ideas about the Biennial appealed to May immediately upon agreeing to curate the exhibition. “What makes Maine so unique is the interconnected relationships between individual artists, communities, and organizations in the arts,” says May. “Working with Sarah, Theresa, and Mark leverages those relationships, and their varying insights and approaches to contemporary art creates a really exciting list of artists to consider.”

In addition to May and Bessire, Secord and Workneh also have connections to the PMA beyond the 2018 Biennial. At the Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture, Workneh worked closely with the PMA for the 2016 exhibition Skowhegan at Seventy, which commemorated the 70th anniversary of the school’s founding and showcased work produced at the school or in its honor. Secord participated as an artist in the museum’s previous Biennial and has work in the PMA collection. She is also the 2017 speaker at the museum’s annual Bernard Osher Lecture Series; her lecture, “Keeping Tradition Alive: Native American Art Ecology in Maine and the Nation,” takes place on September 12 at USM’s Hannaford Hall.

Working as a team benefits the exhibition, as May and his colleagues make studio visits across the state and beyond, talking with artists who have meaningful relationships with the state. “We’re taking the idea of connection seriously—the definition of ‘meaningful’ should pass the straight-face test,” adds May. “But it’s also important to understand that this exhibition, though regional by nature, should not be defined by regionalism. Our border is permeable, and our world in Maine intricately connected to the world beyond our state lines.”
One focus for the group is artists who have never been represented at the PMA before, including past Biennials, exhibitions, or the museum’s collection. These may be artists who have shown extensively elsewhere or are relatively unknown, but it is important to May to use the Biennial to bring artists and artworks to the PMA for the first time.

This is the 10th Biennial exhibition at the PMA and the second Biennial that will be organized by an independent curator who will spend nearly a year visiting artist studios. Funded through the generous bequest of William E. Thon, the PMA Biennial is intended to highlight artists with meaningful connections to Maine and enrich the cultural lives of the people of the state. Inspired by his own experience and love of biennials, Thon entrusted the PMA with the means to offer rich contemporary art experiences to its audiences. You Can’t Get There From Here: The 2015 Portland Museum of Art Biennial was curated by Alison Ferris of Edgecomb, Maine.
The 2018 Portland Museum of Art Biennial is made possible by the William E. and Helen E. Thon Endowment Fund.

The PMA is located at Seven Congress Square in downtown Portland.
For more information, visit portlandmuseum.org.

Portland Museum of Art presents Winslow Homer Studio Tours

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The Maine that you know and love started with Winslow.

Before Winslow Homer arrived at Prouts Neck, no artist had connected Maine to the world’s popular imagination to the extent that he would soon after. His imagery depicted the region with uncommon passion, and drew artists and curiosity seekers to the state in a pilgrimage that continues today.

Discover the place where it all began: the Winslow Homer Studio—restored and preserved exactly as it was when he lived in it. Explore the creaky floorboards, craggy shores, and unparalleled beauty of one of most important locations in American art history, and connect with the Maine all over again. For more information visit www.portlandmuseum.org/homer

Portland Museum of Art Announces Grand Opening of the David E. Shaw and Family Sculpture Park

Sculpture Park Opening

On July 7, the Portland Museum of Art will open the David E. Shaw and Family Sculpture Park in the Joan B. Burns Garden with a community celebration. Taking place on First Friday and featuring food trucks, live music, raffles, art-based activities, and much more, the grand opening of the David E. Shaw and Family Sculpture Park will be the arts and cultural event of the season.

In addition to the grand opening, the entire museum will be free and visitors will be encouraged to take their PMA Summer of Sculpture experience from the Park to the major exhibition inside, A New American Sculpture, 1914-1945: Lachaise, Laurent, Nadelman, and Zorach.
The David E. Shaw and Family Sculpture Park in the Joan B. Burns Garden not only makes outdoor art, a crucial and unique part of the PMA collection, more available to everyone, but it also improves quality of life in Portland, creating a green space where anyone can have quiet moments with world-class works of art at any time during museum hours. The grand opening event also serves as the unveiling of the latest addition to Portland’s outdoor arts landscape and a new major work in the PMA collection: Jonathan Borofsky’s Human Structures (24 Figures Connected).

The Joan B. Burns Garden has incorporated sculpture since Celeste Roberge’s Rising Cairn was installed there in 2000. Since then, the PMA acquired Anthony Caro’s Moment in 2012 and John Bisbee’s Hearsay in 2016. Aside from specific events, however, the public has never been allowed access to the Garden; visitors to the PMA could only admire the works from viewing points throughout the inside of the museum or the sidewalk on High Street. Thanks to Shaw’s gift, the Garden will be open to anyone during PMA hours May through December; whether they are visitors to the museum or simply out for a stroll in Portland.

For more information visit www.portlandmuseum.org

Art and Arias: Opera Maine at the PMA

Ahmed Alsoudani, Untitled (detail), 2013

Ahmed Alsoudani, Untitled (detail), 2013

The PMA is thrilled to partner with Opera Maine (formerly PORTopera) to present a special summer engagement. In this one-night-only performance, up-and-coming baritone Andrew Pardini and music director Timothy Steele from the company’s prestigious Studio Artist Program will look to the PMA collection for inspiration, and treat audiences to a diverse repertoire spanning genres such as classical, jazz, and musical theatre in response to the PMA collection. Join us as we pair artworks with arias!

Past musical events such as last fall’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream with the Portland Symphony Orchestra with Tim Rollins and K.O.S. and the PMA360 performance by BØRNS have been some of the most beloved recent programs at the museum, and Art with Arias continues the tradition of world renowned musicians introducing new ideas to audiences at the museum and connecting their craft with the PMA collection.

Thursday June 29 6:30 PM  –  8:00 PM; $10 for members; $20 general public

For more information visit www.portlandmuseum.org/events/art-arias

A New American Sculpture at PMA

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A New American Sculpture, 1914-1945: Lachaise, Laurent, Nadelman, and Zorach is the first exhibition to investigate the integral relationships between modernism, classicism, and popular imagery in the interwar sculpture of Gaston Lachaise, Robert Laurent, Elie Nadelman, and William Zorach. The exhibition, co-organized by the Portland Museum of Art and the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, explores how this circle of European-born artists became preeminent figures of modernism in the United States. By juxtaposing their works, A New American Sculpture reveals the confluences of sources—from archaism and European avant-garde art to vernacular traditions and American popular culture—that informed these artists’ novel contributions to the history of sculpture. Assembled from public and private collections, this exhibition of approximately 60 sculptures and a number of preparatory drawings addresses the remarkable affinities between the oeuvre of four divergent personalities, who redefined sculpture’s expressive potential during the turbulent interbellum period.

Gaston Lachaise (1882-1935); Woman Seated; 1918, cast 1925; Bronze with nickel plate; Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Purchase with funds provided by the Council of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art; 2007.8

Gaston Lachaise (1882-1935); Woman Seated; 1918, cast 1925; Bronze with nickel plate; Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Purchase with funds provided by the Council of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art; 2007.8

The exhibition is on view at the Portland Museum of Art from May 26, 2017 to September 8, 2017. The exhibition has been organized by the Portland Museum of Art, Maine, and the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. For more information visit https://www.portlandmuseum.org/exhibitions/new-american-sculpture-1914-1945

Portland Museum of Art Announces Curatorial Promotions

Images (L to R): Diana Greenwold, Jessica May, Andrew Eschelbacher

Images (L to R): Diana Greenwold, Jessica May, Andrew Eschelbacher

 

Following the completion of the widely acclaimed reinstallation of its collection, the Portland Museum of Art is pleased to announce three promotions within its curatorial department. Diana Jocelyn Greenwold has been promoted to Associate Curator of American Art, where she will oversee the American art holdings in the PMA collection, including new acquisitions, and develop original exhibitions. Similarly, Andrew Eschelbacher has been promoted to Susan Donnell and Harry W. Konkel Associate Curator of European Art, where he will oversee the European art holdings in the PMA collection, including new acquisitions, and develop original exhibitions.

Both curators report to Jessica May, who has recently been promoted to Deputy Director and Robert and Elizabeth Nanovic Chief Curator. In her new role, May will continue to oversee the museum’s curatorial program, as well as its educational, preparatory, and collections management departments. Recent exhibitions organized by the PMA include The Mistress and the Muse: Selections from the Isabelle and Scott Black Collection(2017); Artist’s Choice: Photographs from the Collection of Judy Glickman Lauder (2017);Of Whales in Paint: Rockwell Kent’s Moby-Dick (2016); Unbound: Tim Rollins and K.O.S.(2016); Duncan Hewitt: Turning Strange (2016); and Georges Braque: Surface and Space(2016).

“We are all delighted and honored to deepen our commitment to the future of this great organization and to take on new and exciting roles with our terrific colleagues and Board,” says May. “With upcoming exhibitions ranging from the birth of modernist sculpture in America to the extravagant beauty of painter Hans Hofmann’s works on paper, and with such great initiatives in our Learning and Interpretation department, it’s an exciting time for all of us at the PMA.”

ABOUT THE PMA

With an extensive collection and nationally renowned exhibitions, the Portland Museum of Art is the cultural heart of Maine. The PMA boasts significant holdings of American, European, and contemporary art, as well as iconic works from Maine—highlighting the rich artistic tradition of the state and its artists. The museum brings it all to life with unparalleled programming. From special members-only events, Free School Tours, and a commitment to family activities, to PMA Films, curator talks, and exclusive tours of the Winslow Homer Studio—it’s all happening at the PMA.

Portland Museum of Art Names Curator for 2018 Biennial

Nat May, guest curator for the 2018 Portland Museum of Art Biennial

Nat May, guest curator for the 2018 Portland Museum of Art Biennial

The Portland Museum of Art is pleased to announce that Nat May is the guest curator for the 2018 Portland Museum of Art Biennial. Nat draws from a deep familiarity with Maine’s contemporary arts landscape through his 13 years as Executive Director of SPACE Gallery, one of the state’s leading venues for contemporary, emerging, and unconventional artists, and will bring together work from living artists with connections to the state for the exhibition. The Biennial opens on January 26, 2018.

“From our earliest conversations, Nat has impressed the staff at the PMA with the depth of his thoughtfulness and his commitment to being inclusive. His research is meticulous, his eye is keen, and his curiosity is unbounded. We are so honored to work with him,” says Deputy Director and Robert and Elizabeth Nanovic Chief Curator Jessica May (no relation), who curated the 2013 PMA Biennial.

A Cape Elizabeth native, Nat was a founding member of the Bakery Photo Collective and has also served as a Board member at Creative Portland and Portland Arts and Culture Alliance. Since 2014, he has served as a founding member of Common Field, a nationwide network of contemporary, experimental, and noncommercial visual art spaces, and as a founding Board member at Hewnoaks Artist Colony in Lovell, Maine.

“I am flattered by the invitation to work with the Portland Museum of Art on the 2018 Biennial,” says May. “The Maine arts community is rich and varied, and there are so many talented artists to consider. I am thrilled to have this new opportunity to invite conversation about contemporary art.”

The PMA’s Judy and Leonard Lauder Director Mark Bessire adds: “Through my time at the PMA, working with the city and community in Portland, and my work on the Board of Advisors at SPACE Gallery, I’ve gotten to know Nat well and admire the way he approaches art. I can’t wait to see what he does with the Biennial—it’s going to be something truly special.” For more information, please contact:
Graeme Kennedy
Director of Marketing & Public Relations
gkennedy@portlandmuseum.org
207.699.4887

PMA reopens with “Lights Across Congress”

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The countdown to the unveiling of the new PMA begins at 6 p.m. on February 3 with Lights Across Congress, a special event that will bring together more than 20 community organizations, businesses, and supporters to present a massive 130-foot-wide cinematic projection on the museum’s façade, promising to be the Maine arts event of the year.

Lights Across Congress will serve as a public countdown to the reopening of the PMA, and at the end of the projection the museum will open its doors and welcome visitors to the entirely new and reimagined PMA, for free.

Lights Across Congress will include one of the largest multidimensional projections in Portland’s history, made possible through generous support from Unum as well as through partnerships with Headlight AV, p3, and the City of Portland. To celebrate the reopening of the museum, the projection will light up the façade of the PMA with an exciting and colorful animated sequence that people will remember for years to come. With support from the city of Portland and to provide as many viewing angles as possible, Free Street at Congress Street will be closed to traffic on the evening of February 3.

Many more community partners will be involved—including ice sculptors, food trucks, and the Friends of Congress Square Park—to make Lights Across Congress a festive winter carnival environment and a true party to mark the reopening of the PMA.

Lights Across Congress is a moment of celebration for the Portland Museum of Art, as well as an opportunity to showcase the economic and social power of Maine’s arts and culture for a wide array of organizations, community partners, and businesses. From leading corporations such as UNUM to creative agencies such as p3 and The VIA Agency, and from community organizations such as Creative Portland to state agencies such as the Maine Office of Tourism, Lights Across Congress and the reopening of the PMA provides a moment for the city of Portland and the state of Maine to rally around the arts.

Portland Museum of Art Announces Historic Gift

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The Portland Museum of Art is thrilled to announce that it has received the largest matching gift in the museum’s history. A gift of five million dollars will be donated to the PMA by longtime American museum benefactors Judy and Leonard Lauder to support the museum’s endowment. The Lauders’ generous gift is intended to inspire philanthropy in others for the PMA, and officially marks the beginning of the Focused Endowment Initiative—a targeted plan to increase the museum’s endowment by a total of $15 million.
To honor this historic gift and to recognize Judy’s long-term commitment to the PMA, the PMA Director position will be named the Judy and Leonard Lauder Director of the Portland Museum of Art.
Mr. and Mrs. Lauder made the following remarks: “We are overjoyed to be able to make this gift to the Portland Museum of Art in recognition of its sterling leadership—from Director Mark Bessire and Board Chairman Jeffrey Kane—to the extraordinary Board, museum staff, and volunteers, who have collectively made the Portland Museum of Art one of the leading regional art museums in the United States. While we recognize the importance of buildings, we also recognize the tremendous importance of economic stability for cultural institutions. We are confident that this gift, which focuses on the museum endowment, will greatly enhance and promote the financial integrity of this magnificent Maine institution.”
“This is a transformative gift and one of the largest in the history of the Portland Museum of Art,” said PMA Director Mark H.C. Bessire. “When we complete the Focused Endowment Initiative—spurred by the remarkable contributions of Judy and Leonard Lauder—the museum’s endowment will have grown to almost $40 million, thus providing the PMA with the stronger foundation it needs to effectively continue its mission.”
Prior transformative gifts to the museum include the gift of 17 Winslow Homer works from Charles Shipman Payson in 1979, the gift of the great Renoir and related Impressionist works of art from John Whitney Payson in 1991, and the $4 million bequest from William Thon in 2000.
“We are immensely grateful to Judy and Leonard for this remarkable act of generosity and confidence in our enterprise,” expressed Board Chairman Jeffrey Kane. “As the Lauder gift clearly demonstrates, the museum’s focus on improving the visitor experience with the collection has made a compelling case for continued investment. This historic and generous gift confirms the Lauders’ extraordinary commitment to the arts and strengthens the capabilities of the PMA to connect art to everyday life.”

The museum is located at Seven Congress Square in downtown Portland.

Winter Hours (beginning October 12): Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Thursday and Friday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Admission is $15 for adults, $13 for seniors, and $10 for students with I.D. Children 14 and under are always free. Admission is free every Friday from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. No admission is required to visit the PMA Café and PMA Store.
Winslow Homer Studio tours are available by reservation. For more information, call (207) 775- 6148 or visit portlandmuseum.org.

Explore the streets of Portland with PMA Go

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On September 2, the Portland Museum of Art launched PMA Go, a web-based, art-collecting game inspired by Pokémon Go. Instead of capturing Wartortles, Kakunas, and Vileplumes, players can amass an art collection of Homers, Renoirs, and Wyeths that generates real world rewards. While many art museums—including the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Whitney Museum of American Art—have embraced Pokémon Go as a way to draw visitors into their museums, the PMA is the first art museum in the country to use the premise of Pokémon Go to get its art collection out into the community.

PMA Go invites users to explore the streets of Portland, Maine—one of the country’s top destinations with unparalleled restaurants, natural beauty, and top breweries—and discover the breadth of the PMA’s collection. As players amass their art collection by “catching” great works of art around town, they receive real world rewards from the museum, including free admission, free PMA Films tickets for members, and if they find all 18 works, a free copy of The Collection: Highlights From The Portland Museum of Art ($24.95 value).

Playing PMA Go is easy. No downloads or installation is necessary. Just visit PMAgo.org on your mobile device and begin collecting! The game is available to be played across the entire Portland peninsula. Share your collection with your friends on social, and collect your rewards by visiting the PMA. For More information on the current programming at PMA visit www.portlandmuseum.org

Portland Museum of Art Announces New Sculpture Park

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Thanks to a generous donation by local business leader, philanthropist, and arts advocate David E. Shaw, the PMA will open the David E. Shaw and Family Sculpture Park in the summer of 2017.

It has long been a wish of the PMA to make the Joan B. Burns Garden—located on High Street and currently closed to the public except for specific museum programming—an outdoor sculpture park available for the entire Portland community to enjoy and explore. Through the Shaw family’s donation, the David E. Shaw and Family Sculpture Park will be accessible to all through a gate on High Street, free to the public, and open year-round during museum hours beginning in summer 2017.

“The Shaw family is pleased to play a leadership role in creating a public sculpture park at the Portland Museum of Art,” shares Shaw. “We do this with great appreciation of the benefit of art to society. This park will provide public access to an artistic oasis in a cultural center of our community.”    

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Inspired by the upcoming culmination of Your Museum, Reimagined, the PMA’s multiyear project based on improved experiences with the collection, Shaw—an avid collector of sculpture—saw an opportunity to support the museum and permanently impact the greater Portland community. His donation aligns with the direction of the PMA under its new five-year Strategic Plan, which seeks to actively find ways to make the museum’s collection, historic buildings, and campus accessible to all, and to be “a leader in the growth and vibrancy of Portland’s urban and cultural transformation, including the revitalization of the Congress Square neighborhood”.

Through this generosity, the Shaws provide a gift that enables Portland and its surrounding communities to enjoy and to engage with art in a truly unique, intimate, and beautiful setting free of charge—one of the only green spaces in the heart of the arts district. His gift also accelerates the PMA’s plans for more artwork in the park, including acquisitions to be announced later, which will be installed in the park prior to its opening in 2017.

For more information visit portlandmuseum.org or call (207) 775-6148

PMA – Finest in a Decace

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You’ve brought your out-of-town guests to see lighthouses and eat lobsters—make sure to bring them to the PMA for the full Maine experience.

Introduce them to O’Keeffe, Stettheimer, Torr, Zorach: Women Modernists in New York, named the finest PMA exhibition in a decade by the Boston Globe, and as one of the 17 American art shows worth traveling for by Artnet. Have a beer at the intersection of art and sport with our PMA360: “Museum Moneyball”. Start a summer’s day by relaxing with Yoga in the Garden.

There is no time like August at the PMA. Be sure to make the most of it.

For more information visit www.portlandmuseum.org or call (207) 775-6148

PMA presents Innovators and Entrepreneurs: A Women in Business Forum

Florine Stettheimer (United States, 1871-1944), Picnic at Bedford Hills (detail), oil on canvas, 40 5/16 x 50 1/4 inches. Courtesy of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia.

Florine Stettheimer (United States, 1871-1944), Picnic at Bedford Hills (detail), oil on canvas, 40 5/16 x 50 1/4 inches. Courtesy of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia.

Thursday, July 28
6 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Free for members and employees of Corporate members; $8 general public
Bernard Osher Foundation Auditorium

Influential women have shaped the city of Portland throughout its history. In 1908, author and critic Margaret Jane Mussey Sweat forever transformed the PMA with her bequest of the McLellan House and the funds to build the L.D.M. Sweat Memorial galleries in her husband’s memory. As Portland evolves into a 21st century city and prepares for the next chapter in its history, prominent women throughout the business community remain at the forefront of expansion.

The PMA is proud to present a public forum featuring four such leaders, in conjunction with the exhibition, O’Keeffe, Stettheimer, Torr, Zorach: Women Modernists in New York. Moderated by Jennifer Hutchins, Executive Director of the Maine Association of Nonprofits, this conversation will center on the shared and differing challenges women face in navigating the creative and business worlds, the ways in which these women have found and maintained their voices, and the innovations they’ve applied to their respective industries in Maine and beyond.

Panelists:
Lisa DeSisto, CEO at Maine Today Media
Leeann Leahy, CEO at The VIA Agency
Sarah Peterson, MD, Ph.D., Research Fellow at the Myocardial Biology & Heart Failure Lab, Maine Medical Center Research Institute
Elizabeth Whelan, Owner, Elizabeth Whelan Design

Space is limited and reservations are required. To register call (207) 775-6148 or Click here for tickets.

Media sponsor: MaineBiz

Skowhegan at Seventy at the PMA This Summer

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Brian Bress (United States, born 1975) Organizing the Physical Evidence, 2014 from the portfolio skowheganBOX no. 2, Archival inkjet print, 14 x 11 inches. Museum purchase with support from the Irving Bennett Ellis Fund and John and Linda Coleman, 2015.11.1b

The Portland Museum of Art and the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture—two of the most prominent art institutions in the state of Maine—collaborate on Skowhegan at Seventy, an exhibition that commemorates the 70th anniversary of the school’s founding and showcases work produced at the school or in its honor, including the PMA’s recent acquisition, portfolio titled skowheganBOX no. 2 (2015).

The summer program in central Maine has hosted, as teachers, guest speakers, or students, an astonishing cross-section of the contemporary art world, including Alex Katz, Robert Indiana, Glenn Ligon, Dana Schutz, and countless more—many of whom consider their time in Skowhegan as crucial to the development of their practice. This selection of prints, photographs, and paintings by artists who have taught at or attended Skowhegan comes from the PMA collection and the school’s archives; together, the works offer a glimpse into the nuanced history of contemporary art and its long relationship to the state of Maine.

PMA BACKGROUND

With an extensive collection and nationally renowned exhibitions, the Portland Museum of Art (PMA) is the cultural heart of Maine. The PMA boasts significant holdings of American, European, and contemporary art, as well as iconic works from Maine—highlighting the rich artistic tradition of the state and its artists. The museum brings it all to life with unparalleled programming. From special members-only events, Free School Tours, and a commitment to family activities, to PMA Films, curator talks, and exclusive tours of the Winslow Homer Studio—it’s all happening at the PMA.

The museum is located at Seven Congress Square in downtown Portland.

Summer Hours (through October 10): Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Thursday and Friday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Winter Hours (beginning October 11): Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Thursday and Friday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Admission is $15 for adults, $13 for seniors, and $10 for students with I.D. Children 14 and under are always free. Admission is free every Friday from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. No admission is required to visit the PMA Café and PMA Store.

Winslow Homer Studio tours are available by reservation. For more information, click here or call (207) 775-6148.