Archive for Portland

Cove St. Arts Presents ‘Strange Histories’ by Ian Trask

‘Reforestation’ Ian Trask

 

Join us at the Opening Reception on July 18th from 5-7 for Ian Trask’s Strange Histories. The reception will be a great opportunity to talk to Trask about his process and narratives.  Strange Histories will be showing through September 13th.

 

 

Using vintage slides, Ian Trask creates his own stories. By combining found 35 mm slide photography, analog collage, and assemblage sculpture, Trask creates imaginative double-exposures that transcend the boundaries of time and experience resulting in “strange histories” – Michelangelo’s David presiding over a smorgasbord of Twinkies and other junk food; the Mona Lisa meeting the iconic Campbell’s soup can.

Trask has found “that without prompting, people would share how the collages sparked their imagination. And oftentimes the narratives and perspectives conjured in their heads differed significantly from my own experience of the work – in the best possible way.” Like any great story or history, the narrative is shaped by and understood through personal experience.

 

 

Come experience the show and conjure your own strange histories from Trask’s stunning images. Cove St. Arts is located at 71 Cove Street in Portland.

Cove Street Arts Presents “Strange Histories”

 

Opening reception for Ian Trask, Strange Histories, July 18th 5-7PM at Cove Street Arts in Portland. Using vintage slides, Ian Trask creates his own stories. By combining found 35 mm slide photography, analog collage, and assemblage sculpture, Trask creates imaginative double-exposures that transcend the boundaries of time and experience resulting in “strange histories” – Michelangelo’s “David presiding over a smorgasbord of Twinkies and other junk food; the Mona Lisa meeting the iconic Campbell’s soup can.

Exhibition dates: July 18th – September 13th.

Greenhut Galleries Presents Joel Babbs’ “To the Green Woods and Crystal Waters”

Crystal Pool, oil on linen, 63×52 inches

Greenhut Galleries in Portland is proud to present Joel Babb’s To the Green Woods and Crystal Waters on view from July 5 – August 3, an opening reception will be held on July 11 from 5-7 and an artist talk on Saturday July 20 at 1:00 pm.  Joel has been very busy of late, and not only with the creation of work for this exhibition! Earlier this year, he was one of three 1969 alumni chosen to exhibit work and participate in a panel at Princeton’s Lewis Arts Complex. His work is also included in Bates College Museum of Art’s current exhibition, Uncovered, Selected Works From the Collection. In the fall of 2018, Joel had a solo exhibition and presented a well-attended talk at Bowdoin College. And also in the fall of 2018, the Boston Museum of Fine Art’s acquisition of one of his major cityscapes, Copley Plunge, was covered both in Bob Keyes’ Portland Press Herald profile of the artist and in an American Art Collectorspread. Joel’s beautiful and deeply philosophical statement on his stunning new body of work appears in its entirety below:   

We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it.   

We get it rough enough at homes in towns and cities, in shops, offices, stores, banks….

  ~ George W. Sears, from Woodcraft, 1884

 The curator and writer John Arthur took the title Green Woods and Crystal Waters: the American Landscape Tradition, for a traveling exhibition he organized in 2000. One of my paintings was included in the show. The title of my current solo exhibition, my second at Greenhut Galleries, alludes to Arthur’s exhibition, but embodies the sentiment of Sears’ statement more directly.

I have been inspired by the tradition of earlier American landscape painters, including American Pre-Raphaelites and later comers, such as Homer, Hopper and Richard Estes, as well.  My career has been divided between painting complex cityscapes and Maine landscapes. My oldest guides have been Canaletto for the cityscapes, and Ruisdael for the pastoral landscapes.  I’ve tried to envision their works in contemporary terms-to become the Canaletto of Boston and the Ruisdael of Maine.

But I chose to live in the Maine woods.  Reflecting on the Sears quote, I find the woods a refuge. In our time, the experience of nature is always in balance, or in contrast, to the contemporary urban environment.  On “the pavements grey,” indifferent architecture, cars in traffic, transport by air, computers and our phones, truly a world wide web inhabits our consciousness. And now Google Earth 3-D suggests there is a digital facsimile of the world which can be traveled in and explored like the real world. Entangled in this web, it is ever harder to escape and get a sense of the natural world.  But there remains in us a deep yearning for simplicity and harmony with the natural world.

The Lake Isle of Innisfree

I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,

And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made;

Nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey-bee,

And live alone in the bee-loud glade.

 

And I shall have some peace there, for peace comes dropping slow,

Dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket sings;

There midnight’s all a glimmer, and noon a purple glow,

And evening full of the linnet’s wings.

 

I will arise and go now, for always night and day

I hear lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore;

While I stand on the roadway, or on the pavements grey,

I hear it in the deep heart’s core.

                                                   

  ~ W. B. Yeats

While my first show at Greenhut focused on Mount Desert and the confrontation of land and sea, my current show is mostly forests and brooks in the Maine mountains.  The motion of water, its waves and ripples, and its translucency, with rocky streambeds seen through flickering reflections, is still — along with light filtering down through the trees — the chief action of the paintings.  The interaction of these elements creates the visual fascination of mountain brooks.

While exploring in dense woods, a stream provides sight lines for a more distant view.  It emerges uphill, rushes past, and then disappears into the woods below. Working on these large paintings, I realized the streams have developed into an extended meditation on time. They are like sundials which have the inscription Ex hoc momento pendet aeternitas (“On this moment hangs eternity”).  A razor thin present divides the vastness of the past from the infinity of the future. The water tumbling down is present at your feet for an instant before rushing off downstream; the flow of time, the flow of the stream.  The future is becoming the present, the present becoming the past — the present seems the most fugitive of all time…. Perhaps a painting can arrest for a time a fleeting present, sadly, if not forever, at least for a while.

 Joel Babb is a graduate of Princeton and the Boston Museum School, where he taught for several years. He has also taught at Tufts and Harvard universities. His paintings have been exhibited in many museums and galleries throughout the Northeast and are in numerous prestigious corporate collections and in several museums, including the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Fogg Museum of Harvard University, and the DeCordova Museum in Lincoln, Massachusetts.

Current Exhibitions at Cove Street Arts

Current Exhibitions at Cove Street Arts in Portland

Lucile Evans Retrospective June 1 – August 10

Lucile Evans (1894-1993) was a fearless, emotionally complex, and extremely talented painter and printmaker who achieved an impressive career despite the marginalization and constraints faced by female artists of her generation. The exhibit spans five decades (1930s to 1970s) of this pioneering artist’s work.

Photographing Coastal Maine  June 1 – July 13

The current show features multiple works by each of 10 invited photographers, who come from Kittery to the Canadian border and all points in between. Though the work included is organized around a central theme, this exhibition boasts a great diversity of style, process, and subject matter and includes both well-established and up-and-coming photographers.

The Sartorial Self   June 1 – July 27

“The Sartorial Self,” is a group show exploring the intersection of fashion and identity. Displayed are works from Crystal Cawley, Andy Warhol, Fred Lynch, Gin Stone, and Lesia Sochor.

Other Artists on View

George Lloyd (Artist in Residence), Tom Hall, Michel Droge, John Bisbee, Bernard Langlais, Sean Alanzo Harris, Stephen Porter, Tim Christensen, and Tom Paiement

71 Cove Street Portland, Maine 04101 207.808.8911 www.covestreetarts.com

You’re Invited: Maine Crafts Portland’s One Year Anniversary Party

 

Please join us during the July First Friday Art Walk on July 5 from 5-8 to toast our first year of success!

We will be celebrating with the opening of IN THE BAG: a group exhibition in the flex space featuring seven MCA members making bags of various interpretations, media, dimensions and utility. 

Thank you, Portland! Instead of having an anniversary sale we are going to share in our success! 10% of our anniversary day total sales will be donated to Side x Side: an organization strengthening our next generation of artists through hands on opportunities and diversified collaboration.

Take a free ride on a pedicab (you’ll know which ones are ours when you see them!). Maine Craft Portland and the Metals Collective have partnered to offer free rides between Maine Craft Portland and the Metals Collective annual exhibition opening reception at The Bearded Lady’s Jewel Box (644 Congress)!

Recent Works by Margaret Lawrence at Greenhouse Galleries

Margaret Lawrence, Along the Path, oil on panel, 32 x 32 inches

From June 6-29, Greenhut is pleased to present a solo exhibition of 23 oils and 5 gouaches by long-time Greenhut artist Margaret Lawrence. Work featured includes landscapes continuing the artist’s recent explorations of the interplay between water, land and sky, as well as a spring fresh meditation on flowers, contemplated deeply through texture and abstractions of form.

Of her new body of work, the artist says: My intent with these paintings was to further explore those moments that uplift and foster hope; taking pause to appreciate the cycle of the sun, the in and out of the tide, and the beauty of perennials in varying stages of bloom. In challenging times these natural cycles are sustaining and grounding. This is a premise that has been the underpinning of my work for some time — nature is a valued mentor.

This reflective, internalized response to the physical environment informs her tranquil and textured dreamscapes, which seem to exist at the horizon between the personal and the universal.

In Lawrence’s own words, “My paintings are developed by removing paint as much as by applying it. Through this layering, the give and take of paint, an image that was inspired by a specific place transforms into a sense of place.” This approach yields a rich image using layered surfaces with deceptively complex color and texture. Both the effect achieved and Lawrence’s process itself are evocative of dream formation, wherein specific personal memories undergo a similar cycle of abrasion and accretion before they wash up in our dreams. Stripped of literal meaning but enriched with latent content, they exist in the symbolic realm, just beyond the grasp of language, where boundaries soften and binaries dissolve….  

After working as a registered nurse until her children were school aged, Margaret decided to pursue a long-harbored interest in art, eventually earning a BFA at Maine College of Art. In 2015, she was commissioned to create four large paintings for the Augusta Judicial Center’s permanent collection. In recent years she has participated in an artist residency at the International School of Painting and Drawing and Sculpture in Umbria, Italy. Her work is in many private and corporate collections in Canada, Great Britain, and throughout the U.S. Margaret has been represented by Greenhut since 1997.

Susan Barnes, Near There, mixed media on panel, 40 x 32 inches

Our June side gallery exhibition features mixed media landscapes by Susan Barnes. Art writer Kristi Niemeyer characterizes Barnes as “A gypsy painter,” whose “imagination, stretched taut as a canvas, guides her hands,” adding that “her experience…frames each painting.” As a child, Barnes lived in Alaska where the landscape was a constant inspiration. Before settling in Maine in 2000, Barnes also lived in Boston, Montana, and New York City. Her evocative landscapes, marked by a fluidity of motion and a passionate hand, combine elements of the media she loves most: photography, collage and painting. Barnes is known for creating a sense of place both expansive and introspective, its focus both external and internal. In this artist’s work, we see the physical landscape deconstructed and reconfigured by its impact with memory and emotion. The paintings are equally rich visually and psychologically. Their truths unfold before us, like the interior monologue of a sensitive and eloquent narrator.

Susan Barnes received her MFA from SUNY Buffalo in 1982. She also studied at Portland State University, University of Montana and the Rocky Mountain School of Photography, where she taught classes in Mixed Media Manipulations. She is the recipient of a Montana State Arts grant and has shown in galleries and, occasionally, museums in the Western states.

Greenhut Galleries is located at 146 Middle Street, Portland, ME 04101

The Institute of Contemporary Art at Maine College of Art Announces the Opening of ‘Darkness and the Light’

Susan Webster, Rembrance, 9’x12′

 

The Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) at Maine College of Art (MECA), located in Portland is pleased to announce the opening of Darkness and the Light, an exhibition from Guest Curator Lissa Hunter. On view July 12 – September 20, 2019, with a public Opening Reception on Friday, July 12, 5:00 – 8:00pm.

Dark and light. The space between. The moment of change. The necessity of one to identify the other. Hope. Fading. Clearcutting. Nature. Invited artists will show work addressing these and other implications of light and/or dark. All are Maine artists with established careers and reputations for fine craftsmanship and artistic excellence.  

When I was a child, my mother would say, “Be in before dark”, as I ran out the door to play in summer.  We lived in that kind of neighborhood. It was the fifties, in the Midwest, on a short block with dozens of kids and no fences. “Before dark” became a particular designation of time, between outside in daytime and inside at night. It held a kind of magical conversion, a sliver of time that signaled a shift in energy and focus.  

When the sun fell below the horizon, colors flattened and lost definition. The sky looked lighter than the treetops below, which became a single mass of darkness. Houses were Monopoly pieces, with no definition of windows or porches, just outlines and dark interiors until the lights within were turned on, creating golden rectangles.

The air became cool. The earth smelled moist. And the fireflies became apparent, flashing lights against the gathering dark, adding to the sense of separation from the real world. It didn’t last long. Maybe ten or twenty minutes.   — Lissa Hunter

 

Todd Watts, Maybe Miracles

 

Exhibiting Artists include:

Lynn Duryea, South Portland; Rebecca Goodale, Freeport; Tom Hall, Raymond; Joe Hemes, South Portland; Alison Hildreth, Portland; Lissa Hunter, Portland; Jamie Johnston, Portland; George Mason, Nobleboro; Julie Morringello, Stonington; Jan Owen, Belfast; Warren Seelig, Rockland; Carol Stein, Kittery Point; Todd Watts, Blanchard TWP; Susan Webster, Deer Isle

For the most part, the art scene in America is very young right now; it’s a young audience and young makers, which is the same way it was for me when I was starting out as a young artist. I believe it’s very important, especially being in a college setting, that students be exposed to and learn from later-career artists who are still creating and inventing. Later-career artists who are still contemporary, who have an established voice and who know what they want to say and who have the skills and techniques in the materials they use to say it really well. — Lissa Hunter

Darkness and the Light is organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art at Maine College of Art, Interim Director of Exhibitions Nikki Rayburn, and Guest Curator Lissa Hunter. Because of the size of the Institute of Contemporary Art, many of the artists have undertaken large-scale work to fully take advantage of the gallery spaces.

 

Carol Stein, Reflections on Hope

 

In conjunction with the exhibition, the ICA will host a series of lectures and performances exploring the topics of darkness and light, as well as gallery talks from the artists.

Friday, August 2, 2019: 5PM

Artist Gallery Talk featuring Curator Lissa Hunter and exhibiting artists.

Thursday, August 8, 2019: 6PM

Darkness and the Light Lecture featuring Bernard Reim, Adjunct Professor of Astronomy, University of Southern Maine, vice president of the Astronomical Society of Northern New England, and co-host of WMPG’s live weekly radio program “Scientifically Speaking”

Thursday, September 5, 2019: 6PM

Darkness and the Light Performance featuring jazz musician Barry Saunders, Artist Faculty, University of Southern Maine, and General Music Instructor MSAD 51 Greely Middle School.

Thursday, September 19, 2019: 6PM

Artist Gallery Talk featuring Curator Lissa Hunter and exhibiting artists.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a printed catalog, to be released on August 2, 2019.

Cove Street Arts Opens to Celebrate Maine’s Storied Place in American Art History

 

Greenhut Co-Owners and Co-Directors John Danos and Kelley Lehr are excited to announce the opening of our new venture, Cove Street Arts in Portland. The focus of this multi-media space will be a celebration of Maine’s storied and out-sized place in American Art History, with a mission of promoting contemporary Maine art, contributing to the Maine arts economy, and engaging meaningfully with in the vibrant and growing East Bayside community by offering workshops and art-centered educational opportunities. Our 8,000 square foot exhibition space will be dedicated to showing the incredible breadth and depth of fine art being made in this state and demonstrating how Maine remains a buzzing locus of creative energy – and how vibrant and vital Maine’s art scene continues to be. The space includes multiple galleries and showrooms, a bookstore/small works gallery, event and workshop space, and a full-size, retractable movie screen for video art installations and film screenings. In recognition of the current paucity of affordable studio space in Portland, Cove Street Arts also features two artist studios in which residencies will be offered on an invitational basis.

 

Our three inaugural gallery exhibitions are:

Photographing Coastal Maine — an excellent photography exhibition curated by former CMCA and PhoPa curator, Bruce Brown, who we are honored and delighted to announce will be working with us on an ongoing basis. The current show features multiple works by each of 10 invited photographers, who hail from Kittery to the Canadian border and all points in between. Though the work included is organized around a central theme, this exhibition boasts a great diversity of style, process, and subject matter and includes both well-established and up-and-coming photographers. Participants are: Jeremy Barnard, Jennifer Steen Booher, Caleb Charland, Gifford Ewing, Carol Fonde, Tim Greenway, Carl Austin Hyatt, Peter Ralston, Celeste Roberge, and Ni Rong.

 

 

 

 

Lucile Evans: A Retrospective — Lucile Evans (1894-1993) was a fearless, emotionally complex, and extremely talented painter and printmaker who achieved an impressive career despite the marginalization and constraints faced by female artists of her generation. Evans began her career in California. She participated in the 1939 San Francisco World’s Fair, and, in 1940, she exhibited in a group show at the Stendahl Gallery in Los Angeles that traveled to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. While living in California in the 1940’s, she was featured in a group show at the Pasadena Museum of Art alongside such luminaries as Paul Klee, Raoul Dufy, Maurice de Vlaminck and Fernand Léger, and she also participated in three group exhibitions at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. After relocating to the East Coast (first New York and then D.C.) Evans’s star continued to rise. She exhibited extensively in solo and group shows in major institutions and galleries, including the Corcoran Gallery (with her work winning awards in three exhibitions there), the National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Art Institute of Chicago. (We were delighted, but not surprised, to learn that Greenhut’s own David Driskell curated Ms. Evans into two of these group exhibitions!) Evans’s work is in the permanent collections of Howard University Art Gallery, the National Collection of Fine Arts, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. the Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, and the Superior Court of the District of Columbia, among other important museum and public collections.

This retrospective was carefully curated to include paintings, etchings and prints that demonstrate the artist’s fascinating evolution of style from the 1930’s through the 1970’s. Included are 2 award winning lithographs and 6 works with museum provenance. Kelley and John would like to express our gratitude to the Evans family and estate representative Laurie Perzley for this exciting collaboration — for giving us the opportunity to shine a long-overdue light on an underappreciated female artist’s legacy, and to proudly claim this impressive artist, who spent the last five years of her life in Wells, for Maine.

 

 

 

 

The Sartorial Self — a fun, fabulous, and thought-provoking meditation on the role fashion plays in shaping and expressing identity. This exhibition features bold 1970’s and 1980’s watercolors and wooden constructions by Greenhut artist Fred Lynch alongside Lesia Sochor’s translucent images of women’s garments and mannequins, painted on found sewing patterns, and Crystal Crawley’s 2- and 3-dimensional works inspired by the artist’s interests in the form and history of clothing and the possibilities of paper and fabric sculpture with traditional handiwork. The show also features an authenticated 1950’s Andy Warhol illustration for Capezio Shoes, and Gin Stone’s magnificent and ultra haute cat goddess, Bast, who, like her runway worthy gown, is made from reclaimed North Atlantic fishing gear.

 

 

 

 

And we’ve filled the non-gallery exhibition space and the small works gallery with stunning work by John Bisbee (sculpture), Tim Christensen (porcelain), Michel Droge (paintings, graphites), Tom Hall (paintings), Sean Alonzo Harris (photographs), Bernard Langlais (wooden construction), Tom Paiement (mixed media), Stephen Porter (sculpture), DM Whitman (gum bichromate, mixed media), and our first ever Cove Street Artist-in-Residence, Greenhut artist George Lloyd (paintings).

Greenhut Galleries Presents Recent Works by Margaret Lawrence

Margaret Lawrence, Along the Path, oil on panel, 32 x 32 inches

 

In June, Greenhut is pleased to present a solo exhibition of 23 oils and 5 gouaches by long-time Greenhut artist Margaret Lawrence.  There will be an opening reception on June 6 from 5-7 and the show runs through June 29. Work featured includes landscapes continuing the artist’s recent explorations of the interplay between water, land and sky, as well as a spring fresh meditation on flowers, contemplated deeply through texture and abstractions of form.
Margaret Lawrence finds inspiration in images gathered from a variety of sources. Nature, personal experience, and a reflective, internalized response to the physical environment inform her tranquil and textured dreamscapes, which seem to exist at the horizon between the personal and the universal.
In Lawrence’s own words, “My paintings are developed by removing paint as much as by applying it. Through this layering, the give and take of paint, an image that was inspired by a specific place transforms into a sense of place.” This approach yields a rich image using layered surfaces with deceptively complex color and texture. Both the effect achieved and Lawrence’s process itself are evocative of dream formation, wherein specific personal memories undergo a similar cycle of abrasion and accretion before they wash up in our dreams. Stripped of literal meaning but enriched with latent content, they exist in the symbolic realm, just beyond the grasp of language, where boundaries soften and binaries dissolve….
After working as a registered nurse until her children were school aged, Margaret decided to pursue a long-harbored interest in art, eventually earning a BFA at Maine College of Art. In 2015, she was commissioned to create four large paintings for the Augusta Judicial Center’s permanent collection. In recent years she has participated in an artist residency at the International School of Painting and Drawing and Sculpture in Umbria, Italy. Her work is in many private and corporate collections in Canada, Great Britain, and throughout the U.S. Margaret has been represented by Greenhut since 1997.

Susan Barnes, Near There, mixed media on panel, 40 x 32 inches

 

Our June side gallery exhibition features mixed media landscapes by Susan Barnes. Art writer Kristi Niemeyer characterizes Barnes as “A gypsy painter,” whose “imagination, stretched taut as a canvas, guides her hands,” adding that “her experience…frames each painting.” As a child, Barnes lived in Alaska where the landscape was a constant inspiration. Before settling in Maine in 2000, Barnes also lived in Boston, Montana, and New York City. Her evocative landscapes, marked by a fluidity of motion and a passionate hand, combine elements of the media she loves most: photography, collage and painting. Barnes is known for creating a sense of place both expansive and introspective, its focus both external and internal. In this artist’s work, we see the physical landscape deconstructed and reconfigured by its impact with memory and emotion. The paintings are equally rich visually and psychologically. Their truths unfold before us, like the interior monologue of a sensitive and eloquent narrator.
Susan Barnes received her MFA from SUNY Buffalo in 1982. She also studied at Portland State University, University of Montana and the Rocky Mountain School of Photography, where she taught classes in Mixed Media Manipulations. She is the recipient of a Montana State Arts grant and has shown in galleries and, occasionally, museums in the Western states.

Richard Boyd Art Gallery shows works by Randy Eckard

 

Randy Eckard “From Another Time” Watercolor on Paper 21” x 15”

 

You’re invited to meet artist Randy Eckard at Richard Boyd Art Gallery in Portland on Saturday, June 1 between the hours of 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. at the opening of his solo exhibition of paintings in watercolor. The show will run through June 29.

Raised in North Carolina, Randy studied at the Ringling School of Art in Sarasota, Florida and the Haywood School of Craft in Clyde, North Carolina. A trained commercial and fine artist living in Blue Hill, Maine his career as a fine artist working exclusively with watercolors spans more than three decades.

Recently selected as one of Maine’s most collectible artists for 2019 in “Maine Home and Design Magazine’s artmaine 2019 Annual Guide” Randy is known for his use of light and shadow, with the subject of most of his paintings being light and how it defines and shapes the scene before him.

Winning over 190 awards for his paintings in watercolor throughout New England and the Southeast, his work is widely collected and included in numerous private and corporate collections. The exhibit is open free of charge between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. daily through June 29, 2019.

For more information about the exhibit or reception contact the gallery by phone at (207)-712-1097, via email info@richardboydartgallery.com or visit the gallery’s website at www.richardboydartgallery.com .