Archive for Portland

Greenhut Galleries to Showcase Alison Goodwin

Long-time Greenhut artist Alison Goodwin, best known for her whimsical, vividly imaginative paintings, opens her 10th Greenhut solo show, Ragged Bounty, with a reception from 5-7:00 pm on November 1, 2018. The show continues until December 1.
Goodwin’s iridescent, bold, and vibrant paintings are marked by their playful exuberance as well as a deep and abiding reverence for the state of Maine and its inhabitants. Having grown up on the southern Maine coast and now living in Portland and Rockland, the artist’s love and affinity for the region lies both on her sleeve and at the cellular level.
Included in this exhibition (along with landscapes and other subjects) are the latest of several iterations of Goodwin’s fishermen saints.  Living among fishermen most of her life, she has cultivated a fascination for watching them work — often from her front porch or kayak. Goodwin paints portraits of these fishermen, encircling their heads in golden halos, canonizing them as icons of Maine’s ragged bounty. These works reveal Goodwin’s respect and gratitude for the harvesters of the sea and for their role in developing our close relationship with the natural world.  This work conveys what the artist describes as a certain “reverence for the way they make a living, battling nature day after day.” She feels that these fisherman “not only keep Maine honest but give it a holiness.”
Influenced by Hundertwasser, Klimt, Matisse and Calder, Goodwin’s work throughout her career is characterized both by her use of turbulent, saturated color and by the delightfully skewed perspectives of her compositions, typically depicting unruly landscapes, expressive interiors, and kinetic villages. Goodwin’s voice is energetic and funky, hip-yet-sincere.  Though her work boldly references many masters, her style is unique, and distinctively her own. As art historian Shannon Egan put it: “By taking Gauguin’s halo, van Gogh’s colors, Matisse’s patterns, and Picasso’s ambiguities of subject and space, Goodwin presents a complicated marriage of particular art-historical references. She avoids pastiche and instead finds originality in a careful use of a visual and historical language. Goodwin translates the pictorial concerns of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century artists into a new vision for contemporary painting.”
Each of her paintings is built on layers of patterns and geometric designs which combine to create larger constructive elements. Goodwin often explores these elements in graphic charcoal drawings and abstract paintings that amplify these characteristics. Her abstract work thus builds new forms which transfer to successive cycles of paintings.
Alison Goodwin graduated from the University of Southern Maine (1981) and Portland School of Art (now Maine College of Art)(1984). Her work is included in private and corporate collections regionally and throughout the world, including those of Grown Brothers Harriman & Company, Wellesley College, Pierce Atwood, Nelson Kinder & Mosseau, Fletcher Allen Health Care, and National Semiconductor.

OCTOBER News & Opportunities from the Maine Crafts Association

 

Image: Embergrove shot by Michael Wilson | Artists In Their Studios 2018

 

 

MCA Program Calendar: Upcoming Events and Deadlines

OCTOBER

Oct 6: Last day to view Winterstick Snowboards @ Center for Maine Craft Gallery

Oct 8: Maine Craft Weekend YARD SIGN ordering deadline (for MCW participants)

Oct 9 – Nov 18: The Luthiers’ Craft @ Center for Maine Craft Gallery

Oct 13: Maine Craft Weekend Mini Craft Show @ Center for Maine Craft 9am-3pm

Oct 13 & 14: Maine Craft Weekend

Oct 15: Craft Apprentice Program 2019 application opens

Oct 15: Portland Fine Craft Show 2019 application opens

Oct 23: CAP Artist Talk & 2019 CAP Information Session @ Maine Craft Portland

Oct 27: Photography for Craft Artists Workshop (Portland)

2018 Looking Ahead

Nov: Center for Maine Craft 10th Anniversary Month!

Nov-Dec: Annual Ornament Showcase @ Center for Maine Craft Gallery

Dec 7: Craft Apprentice Program 2019 Application Deadline

Dec 14-16: MCA Mentor Booth @ CraftBoston

2019

January 31st: Portland Fine Craft Show Application Deadline

June-October 2019: MCA Master Craft Artist Ten-Year Anniversary Exhibition @ Fuller Craft Museum

May 9-12: Annual MCA Workshop Weekend @ Haystack

June 1: 2019 Seconds & Supplies SALE @ Running with Scissors

October 5&6: Maine Craft Weekend 2019

 

 

Detail, Nancy Giesberger (2018 Master)

 

 

CAP Artist Talk and Information Session October 23, 3pm, Free

Free and Open to the Public, 3:00 – 4:00pm

Maine Craft Portland | 521 Congress Street, Portland, ME 04101 | 207-808-8184

Craft Apprentice Program Info Session (Application tips, program description, Q&A) and 2018 Masters & Apprentices Artist Talks by Christine Peters (2018 Master), Nina Devenny (2018 Apprentice) and Nina Ruit (2018 Apprentice)

The 2019 program has funding to support five Master/Apprentice pairs thanks to a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, and we have simplified the CAP application – there is no better year to apply!

The session will provide information about the program and application process as well as serve an opportunity to connect with other artists looking for a master or apprentice match.  The session will take place in the new Flex Space at Maine Craft Portland, currently featuring work from the 2018 Craft Apprentice Program masters and apprentices.

 

 

 

Maine Craft Weekend

Visitors

Plan your tour! Next weekend October 13-14, hundreds of artists will open their studios, offer pop-up shops, mini workshops and demos, special events and collaborations with craft venues (including brewers!) as part of this annual statewide celebration of Maine craft. This year visitors may ‘check-in’ on the event website to receive special tour recommendations, email updates/social media alerts and provide feedback.

Artists/Host Sites

Late registrations accepted through October 8, small fee applies. Don’t forget to order your yard signs – deadline is midnight October 8! Check out these tips for promoting your event.

2018 Sponsors Artscope, Maine Made, Maine Crafts Association, Maine Arts Commission, The Betterment Fund, City of Hallowell, Heart of Ellsworth, Discover Gardiner, DownEast, Portland Pottery, Moosehead Lake, Cyber Copy, Maine Charitable Mechanics’ Association and Maine Gallery + Studio Guide.

For Event Information go to: https://mainecraftweekend.org

 

 

 

Photography for Crafts Artists

Good photography is crucial to sharing your work online, and can help set you apart in world full of social media. While a professional photographer can provide amazing and consistent results, this may not be in the budget for all of your projects. Sign up to learn these essential skills with professional photographer, Andrew Davis in Portland, ME on October 27, 2018.

Visit: https://mainecrafts.org for more information

 

 

LEARN MORE & CONTACT US

Center for Maine Craft

P.O. Box 342
GardinerME 04345
United States

Physical Address
288 Lewiston Road, West Gardiner, ME
(207) 588-0021

Maine Craft Portland
521 Congress Street, Portland, ME
(207) 808-8184

MCA Office: (207) 205- 0791

www.mainecrafts.org

 

 

 

 

The PMA Presents Major Exhibition of Work by Modernist Sculptor Isamu Noguchi

Isamu Noguchi working on model for Riverside Park Playground, 1963. ©The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, New York / ARS. Photo by Michio Noguchi

 

The Portland Museum of Art (PMA) is honored to announce it will open Beyond the Pedestal: Isamu Noguchi and the Borders of Sculptureon October 5, 2018. This exhibition of approximately 40 sculptures and 10 works on paper is a rare Maine retrospective of Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988), the Japanese-American artist who became a central figure in the development of 20th-century American modernism. The exhibition runs through January 6, 2019.

Beyond the Pedestal examines the ways Noguchi reimagined the possibilities of sculpture over the course of his 60-year career. The show brings together varied aspects of Noguchi’s expansive production—which included traditional sculpture, landscape architecture, memorials, stage sets, interior designs, furniture, and more—highlighting the artist’s belief that the sculptor’s role was “to order and animate space.” Noguchi was as comfortable creating monuments and gardens as he was collaborating to produce industrial design and stage sets. Juxtaposed across the exhibition, his works complicate notions of form and function and use the mix of materials, shapes, and techniques to encourage audiences to reimagine their sense of what sculpture can be.

Beyond the Pedestal also reveals Noguchi as a man engaged with the cultural instabilities of the world around him. In addition to showing how spaces such as playgrounds could transform social interactions, the exhibition investigates Noguchi’s direct treatment of fundamental social justice questions. His art addresses racial injustice, the internment of Japanese Americans during the Second World War, and nuclear proliferation—among other themes—forming a thorough examination not only of the renowned artist’s perspective on sculpture, but on the world itself.

In 1986, just two years before he died, Noguchi served as the American representative at the Venice Biennale—the most-prestigious international contemporary art exhibition of the time. The show, which the artist titled Isamu Noguchi: What is Sculpture?, confounded many critics in its diversity of styles and materials. Nevertheless, it got to the heart of Noguchi’s ambition to investigate sculpture’s potential to inform social spaces and spur physical, intellectual, and even spiritual engagement between audiences and artworks.

This question—“what is sculpture?”—is the starting point for Beyond the Pedestal, an exhibition that allows PMA audiences to examine the artist’s driving interest in the relationships between people, objects, and spaces.

 

Isamu Noguchi (United States, 1904–1988), Slide Mantra Maquette, circa 1985, botticino marble, 27 3/4 x 29 1/2 x 27 inches. The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, CR#605 m3. © The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, New York / ARS.

PLAY AND MOVEMENT

Isamu Noguchi believed that the interaction between people, his artworks and their environments was crucial for the perception of space and that movement—like volume, line, and proportion—was central to the process for engaging sculpture.

The bronze cast of Play Mountain, for example, reveals Noguchi’s first foray in landscape design. The table-top sculpture is a plan for an environment that Noguchi envisioned would fill an entire city block. Believing that play could offer the potential for children to experience sculpture and the city through physical interaction, Noguchi broke from the standards of New York City playgrounds as fenced-in, asphalt-covered lots, and instead imagined sculpting the earth itself to create slides, steps, and curves. Although his vision was never made into reality, the model served as a touchstone for him throughout his life.

 

 

Isamu Noguchi (United States, 1904–1988), Play Sculpture, c.1975 – 76 ( fabricated in 2017) Steel 44 x 103 x 103 in. (111.8 x 261.6 x 261.6 cm) Courtesy of San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

 

 

Noguchi’s interest in movement surfaced in his art in various forms. With works such as Play Sculpture, individuals can understand their own space and relation to art by moving around the undulating, serpentine forms. In considering additional relationships of sculpture and movement, Noguchi collaborated with architects, inventors, and performers. He frequently partnered with choreographers such as Martha Graham and Erick Hawkins to develop stage sets that fostered the performative movement of dance. By creating the sculptural structure for these environments, as he did with Jungle Gym, Noguchi offered audiences new ways to see the world of dance.

MEMORIALS AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

Isamu Noguchi was committed to examining all facets of the relationship between human experience and sculpture, leading him to engage crucial causes of social justice through his art. In the 1930s through the 1950s, he designed sculptures that considered issues that shook both American culture and global society.

In the 1940s, Noguchi voluntarily entered the Poston War Relocation Center—a federal detention center for Japanese-American citizens during the Second World War—where he stayed for seven months. Though he had hoped to humanize the environment through art, his sculptures from this time reveal his pain and disillusionment as he confronted his isolation and American xenophobia. Some of these powerful works, including Yellow Landscape and My Arizona, will be on view in Beyond the Pedestal. Other works in this section of the exhibition, including Monument to Ben Franklin, suggest the artist’s negotiation of his own American identity, while sculptures such as Monument to Heroes serve as a painful meditation on the human costs of war.

 

DOMESTIC LANDSCAPES

Beyond the Pedestal also explores how Isamu Noguchi’s expansive understanding of his medium led him to sculpt numerous objects that could traditionally be classified as interior decor. Rather than simply create lights, chairs, and tables that conformed to modernist furniture conventions, however, he crafted furniture that recalled other examples of his sculpture as well as sculpture that evoked his design concepts. His free-form sofa and ottoman, for example, more closely suggest the river stones he used in his gardens than the stark lines of contemporary modernist couches. On the other hand, the composition of the layered metal planes in Lingaconjures the idea of a recognizable folded table.

Noguchi collaborated extensively when developing his sculpted interior pieces. For his Akari lamps, for instance, he worked with a manufacturer in Gifu, Japan, and he partnered with the American industrial manufacturer Knoll on his rocking stools. He took pleasure in the way these works could be produced industrially, making his sculpture available to a broader audience, and felt no concern that a commercial practice would devalue his aesthetic. While many of these forms appear iconic to our 21st-century eyes, when Noguchi created them in the middle of the last century they fundamentally altered the perception of the link between furniture and sculpture.

 

CREDITS

Beyond the Pedestal: Isamu Noguchi and the Borders of Sculpture has been co-organized by the Portland Museum of Art, Maine and The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum.

Generously supported in part by:
Eileen T. Gillespie and Timothy Fahey
Karen L. McDonald
Christina F. Petra
David E. Shaw

Foundation Support: The Japan Foundation, New York

Corporate Sponsor: KeyBank sponsorship is made in honor of Sterling Kozlowski.

Media Sponsors:
Artscope
Maine Public

 

PMA BACKGROUND

With an extensive collection and nationally renowned exhibitions, the Portland Museum of Art (PMA) is the cultural heart of Maine. The PMA boasts significant holdings of American, European, and contemporary art, as well as iconic works from Maine—highlighting the rich artistic tradition of the state and its artists. The museum brings it all to life with unparalleled programming. From special events, family activities, and community conversations to PMA Films, curator talks, and tours of the Winslow Homer Studio—it’s all happening at the PMA.

The museum is located at Seven Congress Square in downtown Portland.

Summer Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Thursday and Friday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Winter Hours: Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Thursday and Friday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Admission is $15 for adults, $13 for seniors, and $10 for students. Everyone age 21 and under is free thanks to the generosity of Susie Konkel. Admission is free every Friday from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. No admission is required to visit the PMA Café and PMA Store.

Winslow Homer Studio tours are available by reservation. For more information, call (207) 775-6148 or visit portlandmuseum.org.

Greenhut’s October show is “Sandra Quinn: Inside Out”

Sandra Quinn, Safe Passage, encaustic and mixed media, 16 x 18 inches

“What is art in the final analysis?
Art is the shining forth of one’s interiority.”
~ Mu Xin
“I found I could say things with color and
shapes that I couldn’t say any other way
things I had no words for.”
~Georgia O’Keeffe
Greenhut’s October show will be an exhibition of Sandra Quinn’s contemplative, graceful, and quietly evocative encaustic paintings, aptly entitled Inside Out, with an Opening reception Thursday, October 4 from 5-7 pm. Sandra is a gifted abstract painter who has, in Portland Press Herald art critic, Dan Kany’s words, “really mastered encaustic as a medium to the point where she can think fluently in the medium instead of being limited by it.” This fluency is apparent in the finished work, and crucial to the success of the artist’s introspective, deeply meditative process, through which she channels richly personal interior spaces to the outside world using her own unique, energetic, and continually evolving nonverbal language – a language coursing with immediacy and a certain joy in its own being. The work is atmospheric, lyrical, and exudes the quiet confidence of an artist in full control of/complicity with her medium. This complicity not only opens the door to spontaneity, it invites it in. The show runs through October 27.
Like music, Quinn’s art is abstract in the purest sense. It adheres to no object, and refers to no subject. Quinn succeeds in expressing her sui generis emotional being and specific sites of recalled sensation and memory through color, texture, gesture, and symbol (musical notations and glyph-like calligraphy applied to the encaustic surface with graphite or paint sticks).
Central to her style is a fascination for, and an ability to visually depict, space itself, which is often represented in large, irregular, neutral-colored formations at the center of her canvas. She manipulates these spaces in a variety of ways; they might evoke a sweet summer breeze in one painting, and in the next, an invisible force field, driving the colors and other marks to the edge of the canvas. In a sense, the true subject of all of Quinn’s paintings is a transcendent locus of experience and emotion that lies beyond language and falls between the cracks of literal meaning.
Quinn exercises a type of mindfulness, creating a space to convene with her Self – a quiet space for authentic being and emotion to emerge: “My goal is to make work that expresses the feeling of being fully present and focused. I want to explore and experiment, responding to each mark or brushstroke that I put down. There needs to be clarity and balance, bathed in the subtle nuances of space and means to quietly look inside – to see what memories or experiences might bubble to the surface, to be alert and listen. This journey grounds me in the present and guides me to the future.”
There is an intrepid and non-self-critical openness to Quinn’s approach – a non-teleological joy in the process for the process, and a willingness to engage with whatever truths might emerge from the realm of the unconscious. This mind space is accessible only to those who have truly mastered their medium, who trust in their gift, and who have the courage to follow wherever the dialogue between artist and his of her emerging object may lead. Painter’s block is never an issue: “When looking at the blank white surface, I see an invitation, a reminder that anything is possible.”
Sandra Quinn earned a BFA in Painting (with Honors) from Portland School of Art (presently Maine College of Art), and a BA in Painting from San Diego State University. She is a member of the Peregrine Press, and her work has been included in a number of juried exhibitions, including five showings at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art. Her work is included in the permanent collections of the University of New England as well as in numerous corporate and private collections.

Glenn Renell, “Valley Grass”

In the side gallery this month we have new oil paintings by another long-time Greenhut artist, Glenn Renell. An accomplished landscape painter, Glenn has cultivated a profound understanding of the relationship between a painter, a place, and a viewer. His perceptive observation of the subtleties of light and the relationships of sky, land, and horizon are beautifully rendered in his paintings.
“There is a place in landscape painting where the spirit of place meets the soul of the painter, and when the viewer sees and shares that place in a painting, that’s where art begins.”
Born in Portland, Maine [1947] and raised in New York, Glenn attended Rhode Island School of Design, spent four years in the Navy, and graduated from Fort Wright College with a BFA in painting in 1975. He went on to receive an MFA in painting from the University of Massachusetts in 1978 and taught design, drawing and painting at Maine College of Art from 1980 through 2001. Glenn left teaching to paint full-time and now resides in southeast Arizona between the Dragoon and Chiricahua mountains. Renell’s works have been included in numerous museum shows, and are included in public and private collections throughout the world.

September Events at Greenhut Galleries

September 25, 5-7pm
Sample Award Winning Craft Spirits from Liquid Riot Distillery

This month, Greenhut is excited to partner with popular Portland craft distillery, Liquid Riot, to host an in-gallery tasting. On the menu will be a selection of spirits including: Fernet Michaud, Old Port Rye Whiskey, Old Port Single Malt Whiskey, Old Port Bourbon, Old Port Whiskey, Old Port White Oak Whiskey. Fine locally crafted spirits + Maine-sourced fine art = the perfect pairing. This event is free and open to the public (ID’s will be checked). Join us!

September 27, 5:45pm
Reading of New Work by the Maine Arts Commission’s
2018 Literary Fellow, Matthew Clark

Greenhut is excited to announce the next in our ongoing series of literary events, which will be a reading of new work by the Maine Arts Commission’s 2018 Literary Fellow, Matthew Clark. Matthew earned an M.F.A. from the University of Iowa’s Nonfiction Writing Program and will be a Fellow at the MacDowell Artist Colony this fall. His essays have been named Notable in the Best American Non-Required Reading and Best American Essays series as well as being nominated for several Pushcart Prizes. You can find his work in numerous literary journals, including The Antioch Review, Ecotone, The Indiana Review, True Story, The Morning News, and Fourth Genre. Matthew lives in Bath, ME. This event is also free, and open to all.

“6’3″ Man with Doritos,” True Story, Issue #20

Isamu Noguchi is coming soon to the Portland Museum of Art

Isamu Noguchi (United States, 1904–1988), Table, 1971, marble, 2 x 52 x 17 1/4 inches. The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, CR#717. © The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, New York / ARS

Opens October 5 at the Portland Museum of Art

Beyond the Pedestal: Isamu Noguchi and the Borders of Sculpture investigates Noguchi’s expansive artistic practice by exploring his efforts to enlarge and challenge conventional notions of sculptural boundaries. Born in 1904, the Japanese-American modernist experimented endlessly with the intersection of objects, people, and space over the course of his 60-year career. Melding ideas and approaches to art from across the globe, Noguchi created traditional sculpture, landscape architecture, play structures, monuments, stage sets, interior designs, furniture, and more. This exhibition brings aspects of his varied production together, complicating notions of form and function and using the juxtaposition of materials, shapes, and techniques to encourage audiences to reimagine their sense of what sculpture can be.

Beyond the Pedestal: Isamu Noguchi and the Borders of Sculpture has been co-organized by the Portland Museum of Art, Maine and The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum.

Generously supported in part by:
Eileen T. Gillespie and Timothy Fahey
Karen L. McDonald
Christina F. Petra
David E. Shaw

Foundation Support: The Japan Foundation, New York
KeyBank sponsorship is made in honor of Sterling Kozlowski.

This exhibition is part of Art for All.

Art for All is an initiative that supports the PMA’s dedication to being an open, accessible, inclusive, and welcoming museum for all, through exhibitions and programs that reflect our community and create experiences with art that strengthen our bonds and bring us together.

TOM PAIEMENT 20 Years of Exploration | Greenhut Galleries

Selfies
Mixed media on panel 15 x 13 inches

TOM PAIEMENT
20 Years of Exploration

September 6 – 29, 2018

Opening reception Thursday, Sept 6 from 5-7pm
Artist talk Thursday, September 20 at 5pm

Grant Drumheller featured in the side gallery.

Greenhut Galleries
146 Middle St
Portland, Maine 04101
207-772-2693

Fresh New Work at Greenhut!

Visit Greenhut Gallery in Portland to see fresh new works on view. New works by Alan Magee, Susan Barnes, J. Thomas R. Higgins, Jeff Bye, Margaret Lawrence and Daniel Minter.

Gallery Hours: Mon -Fri 10-5:30pm, Sat 10-5pm

Greenhut Galleries
146 Middle St
Portland, Maine 04101
207-772-2693

Alan Magee, Chord (2015)
Acrylic on canvas 36 x 44 inches

Susan Barnes, Divide
Mixed media 24 x 24 inches

J. Thomas R. Higgins, Sand Beach Overlook
Oil on panel 24 x 24 inches

Jeff Bye, Harbor Fish Market
Oil on canvas 25 x 48 inches

Margaret Lawrence, Like Glass
Oil on panel 14 x 14 inches

Daniel Minter, Other Self
Acrylic on canvas 36 x 12 inches

PORTLAND MUSEUM OF ART OPENS EXHIBITION OF WORKS INCLUDING RARELY SEEN WATERCOLORS BY JOHN SINGER SARGENT

John Singer Sargent, (United States (b. Italy), 1856 - 1925), The Deck, Venice, circa 1907 Watercolor on paper, 13 1/4 inches Private collection, 11.1995.3

John Singer Sargent, (United States (b. Italy), 1856 – 1925), The Deck, Venice, circa 1907 Watercolor on paper, 13 1/4 inches Private collection, 11.1995.3

On August 17, 2018, the Portland Museum of Art (PMA) opens Americans Abroad, 1860-1915, an exhibition of watercolors, prints, and paintings by American artists who travelled to Europe for training and inspiration in the late 19th century. The exhibition of 24 works by artists such as Mary Cassatt, Winslow Homer, and James Abbott McNeill Whistler, draws from the PMA collection and special loans, and includes rarely seen watercolors by John Singer Sargent, Maurice Prendergast, and more.

In the decades around 1900, American artists went to Europe in droves, seeking training, inspiration, and patronage in the continent’s grand cities and rural enclaves. From Winslow Homer and James Abbott McNeill Whistler to Florence Robinson and Frederick MacMonnies, these artists reveled in famed art havens such as Paris, London, and Venice. They also explored the varied landscapes and villages from the Southern Alps to England’s Northern Coast. Traversing the continent, they honed their formal techniques across media and benefited from the new opportunities for travel and communication that modernity offered.

These American artists experienced Europe in distinct ways. Many settled in Paris or London, where Whistler and Mary Cassatt worked among the international avant garde while MacMonnies established himself at the more traditional Salon. Homer made extended trips to France and England, and John Singer Sargent passed the majority of his life travelling broadly across the continent. Like many artists based in Europe, including Edwin Lord Weeks and Henry Ossawa Tanner, Sargent extended his travel to sites in North Africa and the Middle East, many of which were under European colonial control in these years.

Regardless of the diverse itineraries and experiences, American artists working abroad continually examined the importance of place, focusing on architecture, customs, and the unique qualities of light and landscape. Whether exhibited in Europe or at home, their paintings, sculptures, prints, and watercolors made a lasting impact on the transatlantic story of American art.

This exhibition is in loving memory of Peggy L. Osher, former PMA Trustee and loyal friend to the museum.

The MCA presents the fourth annual Portland Fine Craft Show

The MCA presents the fourth annual Portland Fine Craft Show on August 25, 2018, 9am – 4pm on Congress Street between High and State Streets, in Portland, Maine. The show is free and open to the public.

The Portland Fine Craft Show features over 100 juried exhibitors from Maine and New England exhibiting fine craft in the following media categories: baskets, ceramics, fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, stone and wood, as well as outreach booth exhibiting the work of international artists new to Maine, booths featuring New England arts organizations, schools and guilds by special invitation, live music and food trucks in Longfellow Square. The Portland Fine Craft Show remains one of the only Maine craft shows open to artists not living in Maine, and has a reputation for being well-organized and high quality, with high attendance.

Click here to view exhibitor directory. 

Yikes Studio Enamels at The Portland Fine Craft Show

Suzanne Anderson of Yikes Studio Enamels will be in Booth #7 near the corner of Congress and High St at the Portland Fine Craft Show, presented by the Maine Craft Association, is Saturday August 25, 9am – 4pm on Congress Street between High and State Streets, in Portland, Maine. The show is free and open to the public. The Portland Fine Craft Show features over 100 juried exhibitors from Maine and New England exhibiting fine craft. more info

follow along at: www.suzanneanderson.me

and on instagram at: yikesstudio

Portland Museum of Art Opens first Major Maine Art Museum Exhibition of Work by Pioneering Maine Artist Ashley Bryan

The Portland Museum of Art (PMA) is proud to open Painter and Poet: the Art of Ashley Bryan. This is the first major art museum exhibition in Maine for the award-winning 95-year-old artist and Little Cranberry Island resident, a pioneer of African and African American representation in the children’s book medium, who has published more than 50 titles since his first collection of poems in 1967.

Painter and Poet: the Art of Ashley Bryan, which runs through November 25, 2018, highlights the breadth of his prolific and varied creative output. This exhibition features original art from 14 titles and a selection of independent work, including sketches made while serving in World War II and large puppets made from found objects washed ashore on the Maine island where he has lived for over 60 years. It is the first major art museum exhibition in Maine and provides audiences with the full scope of his career, from his earliest books of African folktales to his 2016 book Freedom Over Me: Eleven Slaves, Their Lives and Dreams Brought to Life by Ashley Bryan, which won a Newbery Honor and Coretta Scott King Honors in both Author and Illustrator categories.

Ashley Bryan (United States, born 1923), “Oh, when the children sing in peace,” 2006, from “Let it Shine: Three Favorite Spirituals,” collage of cut colored paper on paper, 12 x 20 1/2 inches. Collection of the Ashley Bryan Center.

ABOUT ASHLEY BRYAN

Born in 1923, Ashley Bryan grew up in the Bronx during the Great Depression and began making books at the age of six. He has never stopped. Trips to the public library—where he sought out folk tales, fairy tales, novels, biographies, and poetry—fueled his passion for storytelling from a young age. His parents, American immigrants from Antigua, supported and encouraged his creative endeavors; Bryan recollects an art desk they purchased for him and the rich variety of paper scraps that his father, a professional printer, brought home for him.

In 1940, Bryan was accepted into Cooper Union School of Art and Engineering, a significant accomplishment given the lack of opportunities for black students at the time. World War II put his education on hold, however, when he was drafted into a segregated unit of the U.S. Army in 1943. Assigned to the 502nd Port Battalion, Bryan took part in the Normandy invasion, landing on Omaha Beach on June 9, 1944.

After the war, Bryan completed his education at Cooper Union. He later studied philosophy at Columbia University, and went to Germany on a Fulbright scholarship. He taught art in high schools and universities, including 14 years as professor of art at Dartmouth College. In the summer of 1946, while attending Maine’s Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture, he visited Acadia National Park and saw the Cranberry Isles; he soon moved there and has called this island community home for the past 60 years.

Ashley Bryan (United States, born 1923), Front cover illustration for Walk Together Children (1974), Walk Together Children: Black American Spirituals Cover, page 30 [Atheneum, 1974], linoleum cut on rice paper, 7 1/4 x 8 3/4 inches. Collection of The Ashley Bryan Center

ASHLEY BRYAN AND AFRICAN TALES

Ashley Bryan is one of the earliest tellers of African tales in picture-book form in America. In the 1940s, he created a rich body of work that became the foundation for his own series of African folktales, including The Ox of the Wonderful Horns and Other African Folktales (1971) and The Adventures of Aku (1976). The original artworks for these books are precisely rendered tempera paintings in red, ochre, and black that make direct references to African sculptures, masks, and rock paintings. In these books, Bryan not only created the illustrations, but also retold the traditional stories in ways that connect to the visual style.

Extrapolating from sources ranging from South Africa to Angola, Bryan continues to introduce readers to African tales. He notes that “it means a lot to me to open up aspects of black culture to people. I hope that my work with the African tales will be . . . like a bridge reaching across distances of time and space.” In 2003, for instance, he adapted Beautiful Blackbird (on view across the gallery), a story from Zambia, which he illustrated using a collage-based process. In the book, Blackbird shares his gifts by giving each bird “a touch of black,” demonstrating the importance of inclusion, diversity, and self-worth, saying, “just remember, whatever I do, I’ll be me and you’ll be you.”

Organized by The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, Amherst, Massachusetts.
The Portland Museum of Art presentation is made possible by the Maine Humanities Council
Corporate Sponsors: Bath Savings Institution and McCandless & Coburn LLC.

David Driskell opening reception at Greenhut Galleries

Opening reception Thursday July 5th, 5-7pm

Poetry Reading by Robert Gibbons, July 19, 5:45pm

David Driskell in conversation with Daniel Minter, moderated by African Art Historian, Henry Drewal, July 26

Angel of Peace mixed media collage, 30 x 22 inches

Angel of Peace mixed media collage, 30 x 22 inches

Assemblage is newly elected Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences David Driskell’s latest solo exhibition at Greenhut. As the title suggests, this exhibition assembles a variety of new and select earlier works in various media created over the past three decades. Among the new works are five mixed media pieces featured in the PMA’s 2018 Biennial as well as a selection of prints from the 2017 CMCA exhibition, David Driskell, Renewal and Form (which also traveled to the Academy Art Museum in Easton, Maryland). The earlier work, which dates back to 1986, has never before been shown in Maine. As Driskell describes the show: “from a limited edition color lithograph done in 1986 entitled Spirits Watching II to Girl with Sunflowers, a recent collage that was exhibited in the Portland Museum of Art Biennial, these works reveal the range of my interest in subjects drawn from nature, music and aspects of African and African-American culture.”

Driskell’s large and vibrant body of work is informed and impacted by the broad perspective of his own life experience as well as by his unique personal identity. He is the child of sharecroppers, born into the segregated South. But he is also a celebrated international artist and scholar. He is both an urbane denizen of our nation’s capital and a sophisticated world traveler with a deep connection to, and understanding of, the art of Africa and other world cultures. But just as importantly, he is the designer, creator, and loving tender of his own rather Edenic Falmouth, Maine gardens. Driskell — an artist very much concerned with the artist’s quasi-religious role as a “seer” and forthbringer of new forms — creates vivid, imaginative art that is equal parts Americana and Africana in his hand-hewn rural idyll, which is itself a form brought forth from Driskell’s rich, fertile, and prolific imagination.

David cites the strongest influences on his work as: 1) Environment — the natural world, but also “home,” both as a physical space and as a concept. The artist sees a type of “spirit” in the objects he depicts, and the spirit that animates these mundane subjects (furniture, etc.) becomes visible in his finished work); 2) Upbringing – David’s father was a Baptist minister, and many of Driskell’s works are highly stylized, uniquely personal expressions of Biblical themes, or contain motifs from the Judeo-Christian tradition; 3) “My intellectual pursuit of learning from the great civilizations of the world” – we see evidence of this influence through his incorporation of elements of Africana (masks, textile motifs, etc.) and other world cultures (including American, via spirituals, gospel, jazz and blues); and 4) Memory and Imagination.

In Driskell’s work, all of these source energies converge to form a voice complementary to, but unique and distinct from, other important African-American artists of the past and the present. Signatures of his style include rich, vivid color, rhythm, and line (as pictoral element), recurring motifs, and a spirit of constant invention and re-invention. Much of David’s work contains strong decorative elements: calligraphy, African textile motifs, the patterned imagery of folk art, etc., but Driskell never replicates existing patterns. In viewing his work, we see that David has created his own individualized, and fascinating, aesthetic language.

The work selected for Assemblage contains a sampling of all the themes mentioned above (nature, upbringing, world culture, music, memory and imagination), and also includes one fascinating and unusual piece, The Pet, Birmingham Dog, representative of David’s infrequent forays into overtly political subject matter (another of which, Behold Thy Son, is included in the permanent collection of the National Museum of African American History):

The collage Dizzy recounts visually the facial expression I recall seeing as the famous musician played the trumpet. In Ancient Call, a hand points to a stained glass window and an Egyptian statue sounding a mystical religious connection through time. Angels often appear in my work as peacemakers and musicians inviting joy, harmonious living and love. I am equally intrigued by the quiet nature of our favorite pet, the dog, and how these loving animals can be trained to become vicious attackers of people as happened in Birmingham, Alabama under Bull Connor in the 1960s. In The Pet, Birmingham Dog, I have used steel as a collaged material in the composition to emphasize Connor’s strong opposition to the Civil Rights Movement. 

Assemblage is, as David puts it, “a chorus of painterly themes that remain a vital part of my visual pursuit.”

Highly regarded as an artist, scholar and curator, David Driskell is one of the world’s leading authorities on African-American Art. He has been the recipient of thirteen honorary doctorates and has contributed significantly to scholarship in the history of art on the role of Black artists in America. Born in 1931 in Eatonton, Georgia, he was educated at Howard University and received a Master of Fine Arts from The Catholic University Of America. In 1953 he attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine. He became a summer resident of Maine in 1961. In 1976, he curated the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s groundbreaking exhibition, Two Centuries of Black American Art, and wrote the catalog, which became the seminal text of the canon. He currently holds the title of Distinguished University Professor of Art, Emeritus, at the University of Maryland, College Park. In 1997, Driskell was awarded the President’s Medal, the highest honor the University of Maryland bestows on a member of its faculty.  In 1998, the David C. Driskell Center for the Study of Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora was founded to promote his scholarship and service to the University. He has served as an adviser to high profile collectors, including Oprah Winfrey and Bill and Hillary Clinton.  In December of 2000, President Bill Clinton bestowed the National Humanities Medal on Driskell. This April, Driskell was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences.

The Bassist color lithograph, 30 x 21 inches

The Bassist color lithograph, 30 x 21 inches

David Driskell’s paintings and prints have been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions in galleries and museums throughout the USA, and are housed in many important private and public collections, including the National Museum of African American History & Culture, the National Gallery of Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Portland Museum of Art. He has been the recipient of several foundation fellowships among which are the Harmon Foundation, three Rockefeller Foundation Fellowships and the Danforth Foundation.

Clarence H. White and His World: The Art and Craft of Photography, 1895–1925

Clarence H. White (United States, 1871–1925), Drops of Rain [Dew Drops] (detail), 1902, platinum print, 20.2 x 14.9 cm. Library of Congress

This exhibition is the first in over forty years to survey the work of Clarence H. White (United States, 1871–1925), a founding member of the Photo-Secession, a gifted photographer known for his beautiful scenes of quiet domesticity and outdoor idylls, and a major teacher and mentor. It will survey White’s career from its beginnings in 1895 in Newark, Ohio, to his death in Mexico in 1925.

Clarence H. White and His World will bring this essential American artist to the attention of new generations of art enthusiasts and reclaim his place in the American art canon. The exhibition will provide a fresh understanding of White’s career, as shaped by the aesthetic, social, economic, technological, and political transformations of the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era. White’s early work shares with the nascent Arts and Crafts Movement some of the most progressive values of the time, including the advocacy of hand production, closeness to nature, socialism, Japonisme, and the simple life. His move to New York in 1906 and involvement with the influential Photo-Secession group mark a fundamental shift in his production as it grew to encompass nudes made in collaboration with Alfred Stieglitz, commercial illustration for literary works, and deepening relevance to his teaching. Indeed, Clarence H. White the teacher has often overshadowed Clarence H. White the artist; this exhibition seeks to strike a new balance, demonstrating his radical techniques in both arenas. In addition to more than 100 prints, albums, and illustrated books by White himself, the exhibition will include paintings, prints, and drawings by artists who influenced or were influenced by pictorial photography, as well as photographs by White’s closest friends, collaborators, and students, including Gertrude Käsebier, Alfred Stieglitz, and Alvin L. Colburn.

Opening events:
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 20: Director’s Circle and Contemporaries Council Evening Preview and Opening Reception
7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. Thursday, June 21: Business Partners Mornings at the Museum
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, June 21: Members Open House
7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, June 21: Members Evening Reception
10 a.m. Friday, June 22: Open to the public

Organized by the Princeton University Art Museum.
This exhibition has been made possible, in part, with generous support from the Henry Luce Foundation and Isabelle and Scott Black.
Funded in part by a grant from the Maine Arts Commission, an independent state agency supported by the National Endowment for the Arts.
Corporate sponsorship provided by Sabre Yachts and Back Cove Yachts.

80 Exchange Mural Project in Portland

80 Exchange Street, Portland Maine

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Fathom Companies is seeking Maine based artists to submit proposals to design, create and install a wall mural at 80 Exchange Street, Portland Maine. The 80 Exchange Street Mural project is an investment in the city’s future and will provide a contemporary visual public art display and add color and visual interest, character and a unique sense of place to the location.

The purpose of the 80 Exchange Mural is to enhance an already thriving public space with public art that is non commercial, beautiful and thought provoking.

Fostering community and partnerships with the city of Portland and area businesses, this public mural will demonstrate commitment to urban renewal and growth in the Portland neighborhood.

This public work will add a new layer to the city fabric and serve as a featured canvas for contemporary art.

Deadline to submit proposals is July 15, 2018.

LOCATION DETAILS

The 80 Exchange Street Building is located at 80 Exchange Street, Portland, Maine and is popularly known as the Mural Building at Tommy’s Park. Highly recognized, the building is located at the entrance to upper Exchange Street and is adjacent to Tommy’s Park in the historic Old Port. The 80 Exchange Street mural wall is a 4-story facade, brick wall covered in cement stucco.

QUESTIONS

Questions should be directed to Erin Hutton, Art Consultation for the Fathom Companies, through

e-mail at 80ExchangeMural@gmail.com

SELECTION PROCESS

A committee will review all submissions and select an artist or artist team based on their qualifications, experience, and fit for the project. The committee will review proposal materials to determine who to invite for a second round of evaluation. Artists selected for the second round will receive a $500.00 design fee for refining their proposals. Finalists will present their final proposals to the review committee in person. Final proposals will include detailed models, drawings, renderings, samples of work and/or materials depending on the nature of the proposal.

PARAMETERS

The design should fully occupy the entire facade and last for 15 years. The work must integrate into the park as a place of respite and must activate the space.

SELECTION CRITERIA

The committee will review materials based on the following criteria:

● Artistic merit and quality, as substantiated by an artist’s vision, originality, as well as the inherent quality in terms of timelessness of design, aesthetics, and excellence;

● Local significance, translating an emotional connection to the City of Portland, creating a sense of excitement in public spaces and presenting fresh ways of seeing the community and city reflected;

● Demonstrating ideas are well communicated and comprehensive;

● Ability to translate artistic concepts into work that will activate or enhance the proposed space

● Ability to design work, that is sensitive to social, environmental, historical, and/or other relevant contexts

● Capacity to complete the proposal on time and within budget

WHO IS ELIGIBLE

All artists or artist teams with a strong connection to Maine are encouraged to submit proposals. Without preference to racial or ethnic origins, gender, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, disability. Artists must be 18 years of age or older to submit a proposal.

PROJECT BUDGET

Artist’s proposed budget will be a significant consideration in the final selection process. This RFP seeks proposals inclusive of all costs associated with the mural, including, but not limited to, artist design fee, materials, installation labor, travel to and from the site, per diem expenses, project documentation, contingency to cover unexpected expenses and any other costs related to the mural. A budget range of 40-80K is suggested.

Please keep in mind that, as a privately funded project, we will rely on the generosity of individuals, area businesses, corporations and foundations for support. Fathom Companies will launch a fundraising campaign to generate funding and will request the artist and/or artist team to attend fundraising events and gatherings (artists should include within their budget 15 hours for attending fundraising events).

DEADLINE

July 15, 2018 by 5 P.M. is the deadline for submission of materials. Materials received after this date may be excluded from consideration.

MATERIALS REQUIRED IN SUBMISSION

● Materials must be submitted via online form here: 80 Exchange Mural Project Form

( 80ExchangeMural@gmail.com ).

● All documents must be in a PDF format.

● All images must be in a jpg or PDF format.

● Each document must include the artist’s name.

● Any submissions that do not follow the requirements may be considered ineligible.

PROPOSAL REQUIREMENTS

To be reviewed for consideration, the application must contain:

❏ Resume: A current artist resume and exhibition list (2 pages maximum).

❏ Project Narrative: A brief written proposal describing past work/projects, connection to Maine and how you plan to address the site. Proposal should include purpose, rationale and/or intention, including how the piece responds to the site and the surrounding area, and to the City of Portland (2 pages maximum).

❏ Concept Drawings: Illustrative drawings or model showing artwork in relation to 80 Exchange Street. Include concept, sketches and approaches to the project.

❏ Budget: A detailed budget estimate to give cost expectations (include design fees as well as anticipated fabrication, installation and maintenance costs). A more precise budget will be requested for those invited to the finalist round.

❏ Work Examples: Five digital images of recent work. Artist teams must submit five images for each artist represented.

SUBMITTING PROPOSALS

Proposals must be submitted via online form here: 80 Exchange Mural Project Form ( 80ExchangeMural@gmail.com ) by July 15, 2018 by 5 P.M.

PROJECTED TIMELINE

● July 15, 2018: RFP deadline, No late submissions will be accepted

● August, 2018: Committee will meet to review all proposals and select artist(s) for the second round proposal process.

● September, 2018: Finalists will present their final proposals to the review committee in person.

● October, 2018: Committee will meet again to vote on a final selection and artist(s) will be chosen.

● November 2, 2018 – First Friday Art Walk design launch and celebration

● April, 2019: Work on mural will begin

● May, 2019 (approx.): Mural completed

New Exhibit at Venn + Maker in Portland

On June 20th, World Refugee Day, the stories of ten refugees living in Maine will be exhibited at Venn + Maker, a showroom for Maine artists and craftspeople. Visual storyteller Sofia Aldinio and writer Emily Wedick present a mixed media exhibit that unearths the stories of those who have resettled here and the treasured possessions they carried with them.

Opening night will be held on June 20th from 5:30 – 7:30. All are welcome to attend to view the exhibit, meet the artists, hear first account stories from the subjects themselves and enjoy music by Pihcintu Choir and African Dundada.

Maine’s resettled refugees were carried, through a confluence of unique circumstances, away from their homes of origin and to this unlikely landing place– just like objects they brought with them. Carried from Home reveals a deeper understanding of their lives and passages. Through the objects and the stories of those who behold them, we explore the concept of value as it relates to who we are, what we own, where we call home, and what we share as cultures collide and coexist in our state.

Most of us have an object that holds great meaning to us, that we care for, and that has traveled a great distance with us–through time or miles or both. Carried from Home connects the audience with its subjects through the shared experience of holding onto what we care about most.

No matter where we live, we all want to know: who are our neighbors, where do they come from and why are they here? In a time when the value of refugees in our communities is often questioned, Carried from Home shows us that values of our neighbors “from away” are not so foreign after all. Carried from Home seeks to become a statewide mobile exhibit.

Thelma Golden, visionary arts leader, comes to Portland as part of the PMA’s Bernard Osher Lecture series

The Portland Museum of Art is honored to announce that Thelma Golden, Director and Chief Curator of The Studio Museum in Harlem, is the museum’s guest speaker for the 2018 Bernard Osher Lecture on Tuesday, July 9, at the University of Southern Maine’s Hannaford Hall. Tickets go on sale May 24.
With a vision set squarely to the future and a belief in the power of art to shape local communities and affect the wider world, Thelma Golden is an ideal choice for this year’s Bernard Osher Lecture Series, which annually invites visionary cultural leaders, scholars, and thinkers to Maine to share their insights and experiences with PMA audiences.

The Studio Museum is the world’s leading institution devoted to visual art by artists of African descent, located in the heart of Harlem, New York. Under Golden’s leadership, the museum has gained increased renown as a global leader in the exhibition of contemporary art, a center for innovative education, and a cultural anchor in the Harlem community.

Golden’s tenure as Director has also been characterized by a deep commitment to planning for the Museum’s future. In 2015, the museum announced plans to create a new facility on its current site in Harlem. The new building will be the Studio Museum’s first purpose-built facility since its founding in 1968.

Prior to joining the Studio Museum in 2000, Golden was a curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art, where she co-curated the 1993 Whitney Biennial, a landmark exhibition that paved the way for topics of race, gender and identity to be discussed institutionally. One year later, Golden curated the groundbreaking Black Male: Representations of Masculinity in American Art, an exhibition that cemented her reputation as a leading progressive voice in museum and artistic culture.

After leaving the Whitney, Golden accepted the role of Deputy Director for Exhibitions and Programs at the Studio Museum in 2000, and became Director of the institution in 2005. In the years that followed, the Studio Museum has made significant strides in the presentation of contemporary art, and helped shape the future of one of New York’s most historic and important neighborhoods.

Thelma Golden holds a B.A. in Art History and African American Studies from Smith College. She has received honorary doctorates from the City College of New York (2009), San Francisco Art Institute (2008), Smith College (2004), and Moore College of Art and Design (2003). In 2010, she was awarded a Barnard Medal of Distinction from Barnard College. That same year, President Barack Obama appointed Golden to the Committee for the Preservation of the White House, on which she served from 2010–2016.

She currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Barack Obama Foundation and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. She is a 2008 Henry Crown Fellow at the Aspen Institute, and in 2016 received the Audrey Irmas Award for Curatorial Excellence from the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College. In 2015, she was appointed as a Ford Foundation Art of Change Visiting Fellow. Golden is a recognized authority in contemporary art by artists of African descent and an active lecturer and panelist speaking about contemporary art and culture at national and international institutions. Most recently, in March 2018, the J. Paul Getty Trust announced that Golden as the recipient of the annual J. Paul Getty Medal, for transforming the Studio Museum into “one of our nation’s most dynamic visual arts institutions, inspiring to professionals and public alike.”

For more information visit portlandmuseum.org/osher or call (207) 775-6148.

John Whalley | Brushwork

The Manuscript, Egg tempera on panel, 21 x 30 inches

Opening reception Thursday, June 7 from 5-7pm
Artists talk Saturday, June 23 at 1pm

Brushwork is John Whalley’s 8th solo exhibition at Greenhut Galleries. This exhibition of paintings and drawings continues Whalley’s exploration of  reclaiming discarded tools, seashells, and other objects and giving them new life. His beautifully rendered images seem to instill, or rather uncover, an inner light within his subjects.

About the show Whalley states, “This last year as I was preparing a body of work for this show, with the exception of two drawings, I found myself wanting to explore my subjects in color, with a collection of twenty oil and egg tempera paintings. Hence, the title “Brushwork”- which also gave a nod to the seven paintings that had as their subject some of the many old, oversized paintbrushes I’ve collected over the years. Each of these brushes holds a story of their long service that I wanted to pay tribute to.
My studio contains a vast array of “orphaned objects’ which my wife and I have collected over the years, and from these I selected the ones which, in a sense, passed their audition and found their places in each of my paintings. Care was taken to allow a little story to develop in each painting which remains open to the imagination and interpretation of each viewer. I find that the paintings often touch memories and emotions of each viewer, as they have my own. Objects from nature such as a lobster claw, mussel shells and fossils have fascinated me since childhood. Old tools, such as these two wrenches used by my grandfather in Brooklyn in the early 20th century, measuring strings, and putty knife speak of the dignity of common labor. An old pocket watch, compass and clouded bottles harken back to a time of the concern for beauty in the making of objects of everyday use. My love for the printed word, and the idea of story, account for my inclusion of these vintage volumes in the paintings.

My hope is that these works will comprise a collection of winsome scenes, as if from a play, that will bring pleasure with their simple telling.”

The Maine Crafts Association will open MAINE CRAFT PORTLAND

 

The Maine Crafts Association (MCA) will open MAINE CRAFT PORTLAND, a retail gallery and resource center in the historic Maine Charitable Mechanic Association (MCMA) building, known as Mechanic’s Hall, in downtown Portland, Maine this summer! The new MCA space will promote craft in Maine through exhibitions and public programming, and directly benefit Maine craft artists through sales of their work.

Mechanic’s Hall, in the vibrant Arts District—across the street from Maine College of Art, blocks from the Portland Museum of Art, and home to an art supply store—is only made more ideal by the fact that the Mechanic’s mission dovetails with ours. MCMA programs and events will strengthen our efforts and income opportunities. Additionally, as a building tenant, MCA will have access to the Mechanic’s Hall library, ballroom and classroom spaces.

HISTORICAL BUILDING MEETS MODERN MAKERS MOVEMENT

The MCMA building was completed in 1859 and is on the National Historic Register. It served as Portland City Hall after the infamous city-wide fire of 1866. It also housed and served meals to Union troops during the Civil War. An entire wall of historical, floor-to-ceiling hardwood and glass cabinets be will a beautiful feature in the MCA retail space. Thankfully, the building’s historical preservation status has protected the cabinets through the various tenants and uses of the space. The cabinets will become a dominant display and aesthetic component of the MCA space. They were built in the late 1800’s for a jewelry retailer and now offer an exciting design challenge to incorporate with contemporary craft displays.

TIMELINE

The Mechanic’s Hall retail space became available in January 2018. The MCA began a fundraising campaign in February to fund the project and signed the lease in April. The next couple months will be spent renovating the space, hiring staff, ordering inventory and preparing for grand opening this summer!

The project is guided by the MCA strategic plan implemented in January 2017. Desired location, income potential and landlord have been carefully researched, considered and nurtured by the MCA Executive Director and Board of Directors.

EXPERIENCE AND SUCCESS

Since 2008 the MCA has operated the Center for Maine Craft, a retail gallery and resource space in West Gardiner, Maine. The Center grosses close to $600,000 annually by exhibiting and selling the work of 315+ Maine craft artists and makers. The experience managing this successful and impactful Center positions the MCA for success in our second location.

FOR ARTISTS: SELLING YOUR WORK at the NEW MCA STORE

All work represented at the new space will be made by current MCA members living in Maine. The MCA expects approximately 70% of the vendors to be different from our vendors at the Center for Maine Craft. Inventory will be sold on both a consignment and wholesale basis. Inventory mix and orders will be coordinated by the new store manager beginning in April. There will not be a jury process for the first phase of ordering; but, once we have our feet under us a jury process will commence to attract and identify new vendors. To express your interest in having your work carried at Maine Craft Portland please fill out THIS FORM

CAPITAL CAMPAIGN NEARS COMPLETION

The MCA is raising $100,000 start-up capital to open new space. On February 15, the Windgate Foundation announced a matching grant of $50,000. The MCA has received contributions totaling $45,000 from our amazing and supportive network of board members, arts supporters, foundations, Portland businesses, MCA members, friends and family. We currently seeking $5,000 to complete the fundraising phase of this exciting new effort!

DONATE

Greenhut Galleries presents Matt Blackwell and Kathi Smith

Greenhut Galleries presents a two person exhibition.

Matt Blackwell and Kathi Smith
May 3 – 27
Opening reception Thursday, May 3th from 5 – 7pm

Matt Blackwell artist talk Friday, May 4th at 2pm
Kathi Smith artist talk Saturday, May 12th at 2pm

Matt Blackwell

Matt Blackwell’s vibrant mixed media paintings burst with color, texture, and reverberations of the improvisatory bang of their creation. Blackwell is a fearless and prolific artist. His work, which is narrative and rooted in Americana, is wicked quirky, and floridly imaginative. In it, we see the artist’s flair for the uncanny, an irreverent wit, and a keen appreciation for the myriad absurdities of being, but Blackwell’s empathy for his often eccentric protagonists is always apparent. Though some pieces are inspired by the music of singer/songwriters like Bob Dylan, John Prine, and Lucinda Williams, or by scenes from everyday reality, in Blackwell’s America, delirious and carnivalesque inversions of order occur on the regular. Bears stand upright and escort glamorous women to undisclosed locations, gleefully maniacal, Day-of-the-Dead-looking characters speed their pink cartoon of a car around the feet of a great colossus of a moose (whose antlers seem light and airy, like fairy wings), as it stands motionless amid a crowd of random and assorted human and supernatural beings gathered in a forest clearing. As critic David Brody puts it, “Blackwell’s figures are both fantastic projections of psychic roles and notes on everyday weirdness. . . [his] fondness for the Twilight Zone is in cahoots with the ambiguity of his narratives.” Place is important, with most of Blackwell’s imagery drawn from places that meaningfully intersect with his own biography: Maine, upstate New York, and New Mexico. Artists Fintan Boyle and Jennie Nichols describe Blackwell as “something of a regionalist chronicler. As such, the paintings are a form of notation or witnessing. But if the footing is in regionalism there is also a Hogarthian cocked eye on the lookout for the right scene that will give us regionalism’s crusty experience as a cautionary lesson for the wider world.”

Blackwell on his process: “My work is a combination of observation, memory, and painterly process. Although narrative, the work is quite often propelled forward by formal and painterly concerns, abstraction. I often use groups of figures to convey my narratives. However, they exist as a reason to push paint around. Sometimes I have a clear agenda on my narratives, other times it comes about through painterly process. Sometimes the narrative is clear, other times its ambiguous and left to the viewer to draw their own conclusion.”

Matt Blackwell holds a BFA from Portland School of Art (now Maine College of Art)(1977) and an MFA from University of North Carolina (1988), where he received the Holderness Fellowship for Excellence. In 1980, he was the recipient of the Marguerite Zorach scholarship in painting to the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, and in 2015 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship. His work is in the permanent collections of the Portland Museum of Art (see the aforementioned Moose there), the Everson Museum of Art (Syracuse, NY), and the Savannah College of Art and Design (Savannah, GA), as well as many private collections.

Kathi Smith

Kathi Smith’s lush, expressionistic paintings are known for their loose, confident brush strokes, and their complex and sophisticated interplay of textures, gestural marks, and rich, abundant color. As art writer Marcia Santore notes: “Her surfaces are worked and reworked, brushed, rubbed, dabbed, scuffed and pressed, built up in layers, scraped down again, scratched through, into a surface defined by texture and traveling marks, touched by brilliant color.” Thematically, location holds a place of primacy. Smith is most inspired by scenes in which she finds herself lost in the act of looking: “Complicated spaces with an abundance of information intrigue me, and I consider it my task as an artist to find order within them.” Though her work is representational, she is always, in her words, “flirting with abstraction. . .There’s a balance between the literal and the conceptual. For me, painting is about seeing, experiencing, and articulating the world (things, spaces, places) around me. . .using observation, perspective, point of view and perception to translate the world I find myself in.”

Kathi is currently interested in “the role of the landscape in developing any one person’s sense of self, and, when conjured through sensations, such as color, light and touch, how powerful the visual memory of a place can be.” Introducing an implied “self” with a sense of identity in relation to a particular landscape necessarily inscribes it with a narrative quality. As Kathi says, “I look for narratives within the landscape. I find them in backyards, abandoned spaces and in those spaces in between that are often overlooked.”

Most of Smith’s paintings are started on location from direct observation, but are then brought to her studio, where she continues working on them. “Through this process, the paintings become a blend of both real and remembered worlds, more evocative of the subject matter than descriptive.” Kathi’s recent paintings are visually compelling landscapes relevant to her personal history, emotionally inscribed with sense memories of her family’s homestead in Nova Scotia, her hometown in western Maine, and Maine’s Great Cranberry Island. As such, their narrative holds an intimate, first person point of view: “I find familiarities in these places, where a particular light, color, or texture in the landscape will evoke a memory, then becoming my subject.”

Kathi Smith holds a BFA in Painting & Drawing from the University of Southern Maine (2003), and a MFA in Painting from the University of New Hampshire (2008). She has participated in many regional and national exhibitions, and numerous prestigious residencies. She received a full fellowship supported by the Joan Mitchell Foundation to the Vermont Studio Center and has been a Fellow and Artist-in-Residence at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut, and the Heliker-LaHotan Foundation in Maine. She currently teaches studio arts at Husson University in Bangor.

Greenhut Galleries
207.772.2693 info@greenhutgalleries.com
Open Monday through Friday 10:00 – 5:30 and Saturday 10:00 – 5:00

The Maine Crafts Association announces the MCA 2018 Master Craft Artist Award

“David Wolfe is a leader” in Portland printmaking, Master Craft Artist Award judge Andres Verzosa said.

The Maine Crafts Association announces the MCA 2018 Master Craft Artist Award Recipients: Steve Cayard of Wellington, ME, Patricia Daunis-Dunning of Portland, ME, and David Wolfe of Portland, ME.

The Maine Crafts Association (MCA), a statewide non-profit organization promoting the work of Maine’s craft artists, has named Steve Cayard, Patricia Daunis-Dunning and David Wolfe as the 2018 recipients of the MCA Master Craft Artist Award. Recipients are selected for demonstrating excellence in craftsmanship, inspired design, a singular voice or style, and a career of service to the field.

The 2018 MCA Master Craft Award nomination process began in late 2017 with submissions from past award recipients, members of the Maine Crafts Association, and the public. The 2018 recipients were selected by Andres Verzosa, an art advocate, collector, curator, and writer with a distinguished history of service to Maine artists and arts organizations.

Verzosa writes, “We have a lot to be proud of in the Maine arts community, the state is rich with master-level artists. From the long list of stellar nominees, I’ve selected three who are highly regarded by their peers, possess accomplished bodies of work, demonstrate long histories of working in their communities, and have achieved significant recognition in their field. Steven Cayard was a catalyst in the renaissance of birch bark canoe-making with David Moses Bridges (deceased in 2017) and is included in the 2018 Portland Museum of Art Biennial. Patricia Daunis’ designs have been worn nationally for decades, and her studio is a place of growth for many up-and-coming jewelers. David Wolfe is a leader in the Portland printmaking community; his print house serves as hub and resource, and places Portland on a national scale map for printmaking.“

A Celebration, Awards Presentation and Reception for the 2018 Awardees will be announced at a later date.

In the tradition of the Master Craft Artist Award, recipients are invited to teach at the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in Deer Isle ME for MCA Workshop Weekend, May 9-12, 2019. Information and registration will be published at mainecrafts.org in the fall of 2018.

In recognition of 10 years of the MCA Master Craft Artist Award, all recipients from 2009 through 2018 will be featured in an exhibition at the Fuller Craft Museum in Brockton, MA in 2019. Exhibition dates are June 8-October 27, 2019 with a public opening reception on Sunday, June 9, 2019 from 2-5pm.

Steve Cayard

Master birchbark canoe maker Steve Cayard settled in Wellington, Maine in 1987. His canoes are based on careful research and are faithful to the tradition of the early Wabanaki birchbark canoes of Maine and New Brunswick- a style which eventually became the model for the wood-canvas canoes of Old Town, E. M. White and Chestnut, among others. Cayard has been sought out by native communities as a teacher, and he has felt honored to offer them his knowledge in a series of workshops in Maine and New Brunswick. He has also taught birchbark canoe building classes for the general public. He completed his first birchbark canoe in 1978 and has been building on commission since 1995. In 1998, Cayard was honored with a request by the National Museum of the American Indian to restore an 1890s birch bark canoe by well-known Passamaquoddy canoe builder Tomah Joseph. In 2002 Barry Dana, then chief of the Penobscot Nation, invited Cayard to lead a birchbark canoe workshop on Indian Island, the Penobscot reservation in Old Town, Maine. This became the first in a number of on-site canoe workshops that Cayard taught in the Wabanaki communities. Cayard’s work has been featured in WoodenBoat Magazine and his collaborative canoe with the late David Moses Bridges (commissioned by the Abbey Museum in Bar Harbor) was recognized for inclusion in the 2018 Portland Museum of Art Biennial.

Patricia Daunis-Dunning

Esteemed jeweler Patricia Daunis-Dunning considers jewelry “site-specific sculpture”. A Maine native, she founded Daunis Studio with her husband William Dunning in Portland in the early 80s. Over the years Daunis has employed and inspired many young artists and helped them to develop into confident crafts people. Nationally renowned in the field of jewelry and metalsmithing, Daunis-Dunning has been recognized with many awards, among them DeBeers’s Diamonds Today Award, World Gold Council’s Grand and First Prizes, the MJSA’ Custom Design of Distinction (1st and 2nd Prize), and the Jewel Award from Jewelers of America. She has authored numerous articles for Jewelers Inc. Magazine, and has been featured in Contemporary American Jewelry Design by Ettagale Blauer and Metalworking for Jewelry by Tim McCreight, among many other craft and industry publications.Her work has been shown regionally and nationally, including exhibitions at the Museum of Arts & Design (formerly American Craft Museum) and the Fuller Craft Museum. Daunis-Dunning has taught at Boston University and Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, and is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design.

David Wolfe

Master printer David Wolfe founded Wolfe Editions, a letterpress and fine art printing studio with educational programming in Portland, Maine in 1997. Prior to opening his own studio, he worked for several well known printing establishments, including Stinehour Press in Lunenberg, Vermont and Anthoensen Press in Portland. Wolfe’s woodcuts, prints and handmade books are in the collections of Bates College Museum of Art, Bowdoin College Museum of Art Special Collections and the Portland Museum of Art, as well as numerous private collections. He has led many workshops at the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, and was Lead Printmaker in Residence at Penland School of Crafts in 2009. Wolfe studied printmaking at the Maryland Institute College of Art.

9th Biennial Portland Show at Greenhut Galleries

April 5-28, 2018
Artists reception, Saturday April 7, 1-3pm

Greenhut Galleries is pleased to announce its 9th Biennial Portland Show featuring work by 51 artists. In a creative tribute to our city, artists are asked to interpret “Portland”.

Each unique vision of Portland makes for an interesting, exciting, dynamic, sometimes humorous and diverse exhibition. Greenhut is dedicated to showing the finest art made by Maine’s best artists. Please join us in celebrating our wonderful city, Portland, Maine.

Participating artists: Daniel Anselmi, Joel Babb, Susan Barnes, Phil Barter, Chris Beneman, John Bisbee, Mary Bourke, Louise Bourne, Jeff Bye, Thomas Connolly, Ben Coombs,
Diane Dahlke, David Driskell, Grant Drumheller, Kate Emlen, Lindsay Erin, Philip Frey, Roy Germon, Alison Goodwin, Tom Hall, Lindsay Hancock, Madeleine Hopkins, Tina Ingraham, Anne Ireland, William Irvine, Henry Isaacs, Sarah Knock, Margaret Lawrence, Richard Lethem, C Michael Lewis, David Little, George Lloyd, Daniel Minter, Ann Mohnkern, Nancy Morgan Barnes, Colby Myer, Lisa Noonis, Colin Page, Tom Paiement, Phoebe Porteous,  Alison Rector, Glenn Renell, Alec Richardson, Paul Rickert, Kathi Smith, Mike Stiler, Alice Spencer, Bonnie Spiegel, Barbara Sullivan, John Whalley and Richard Wilson.

Gallery Hours: Mon – Fri 10am – 5:30pm
Sat. 10am – 5:00pm
info@greenhutgalleries.com

Portland Museum of Art Announces Free Admission for Everyone 21 Years Old and Under

The Portland Museum of Art is proud to announce that it is changing its admission policy to offer free, unlimited admission to everyone age 21 and under beginning on April 11, 2018, opening the museum’s doors in perpetuity to teens and youth everywhere. The program is made possible through the vision and generosity of Susie Konkel, a leading philanthropist and advocate for youth in Maine and the region, and will include other benefits, all named in her honor as the Susie Konkel Pass.

All visitors age 21 and under will receive free admission automatically when they visit the PMA, but young people or their guardians can also increase their level of engagement by signing up for the Susie Konkel Pass, which will provide the holder opportunities to attend special events including select free screenings of PMA Films, ways to stay up to date on museum happenings, and more.

“I’m honored to work with the staff at the PMA to ensure that every child in the Maine community and throughout the world can feel the joy and wonder that comes from experiencing magnificent works of art,” shares Konkel. “It’s my hope that children, teens, and young adults alike will discover the many ways that art appreciation can enrich their lives, and also feel inspired and empowered to share their voices with the world. I’m incredibly gratified to help the PMA share its wonderful collection with children far and wide.”

The Susie Konkel Pass reflects the collective passion and dedication of the museum and Konkel to widely share the power of art to transform lives and offer all youth access to lasting arts experiences. Additionally, Konkel and the museum envision that removing admission costs will result in freedom at the PMA for young people and their families as a whole, including:

1. Freedom for teens and young adults to use the museum as a safe and inspirational hang-out spot, where they are always welcome, can enjoy arts experiences, and be themselves at any time.

2. Freedom for low-income families to explore the arts and culture in new and different ways, regardless of who they are, how they live, or the economic hurdles they face.

3. Freedom for college and university students to use the PMA as a place to study, relax, and engage with the community as young adults.

4. Freedom for new Mainers to immediately feel a part of their community, to feel represented and respected, and to express themselves in an inclusive environment.

5. Freedom for parents to have more opportunities to enrich their children’s lives, supplement their growth and education, and set them on the path for a lifetime of arts appreciation.

Each year, 11,000 visitors under the age of 21 visit the museum, either through existing relationships with the museum or by being charged admission. Buoyed by a nearly 20% increase in website traffic for visitors ages 18-24 over the past two years, an redesigned Winslow Homer High School Fellow program, Teen Nights at the museum, and collaborations with MECA and USM, the PMA began thinking about a new way to deepen the engagement of young adults.

Susie Konkel had long seen the PMA as a place to reset and recharge, and with the successful completion of Your Museum, Reimagined over this same time period, she was encouraged by the increasingly diverse base of visitors looking to the PMA as a cultural center that reflects their values and lifestyles, and serves their communities.

The PMA’s commitment to broadening its audiences and the people it serves has been a top priority in recent years, and the Susie Konkel Pass is a natural step in that progression. The museum has been looking to build upon a growing Family-level membership base, new family programs, and special events for children, and by offering free admission to all visitors 21 and under, the Susie Konkel Pass becomes the most recent of other transformative moments, programs, and events at the museum including Art for All, Free Fridays, 2017’s Your Museum, Reimagined and Lights Across Congress, and 2018’s Art in Bloom. Together, the PMA and Konkel hope to establish the PMA as an indispensable resource for future generations.

PMA BACKGROUND
With an extensive collection and nationally renowned exhibitions, the Portland Museum of Art (PMA) is the cultural heart of Maine. The PMA boasts significant holdings of American, European, and contemporary art, as well as iconic works from Maine—highlighting the rich artistic tradition of the state and its artists. The museum brings it all to life with unparalleled programming. From special events, Free School Tours, and a commitment to family activities, to PMA Films, curator talks, and exclusive tours of the Winslow Homer Studio—it’s all happening at the PMA.

The museum is located at Seven Congress Square in downtown Portland.
Summer Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Thursday and Friday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Winter Hours: Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Thursday and Friday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Admission is $15 for adults, $13 for seniors, and $10 for students with I.D.

There is always free admission for everyone age 21 and under, provided by the generosity of Susie Konkel.

Admission is free for all, every Friday from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

No admission is required to visit the PMA Café and PMA Store.

Winslow Homer Studio tours are available by reservation. For more information, call (207) 775-6148 or visit portlandmuseum.org.

You are invited to Art House for Art and Wine

Garden in Spring by Brenda Overstrom, 2016

Garden in Spring by Brenda Overstrom, 2016

You are cordially invited to Art House’s afternoon fête, Saturday, March 3rd, 3-5 PM. for the opening for “Brenda Overstrom: Layers of Meaning”

“My paintings are about layers and layering – words, marks and colors. I start by writing, drawing or painting on the surface – paper, canvas or panel. The words are revelations from dreams, drawings are abstractions inspired by something I’ve read or seen in the natural world. During the process of adding, layering and often, wiping off color some of my favorite “places” on the surface are obscured. I love the fact that what I consider to be the most beautiful area is hidden just under the surface. I hope this work represents a small part of the process, which I am devoted to, of engaging with tensions, both personal and universal, between stasis and creation. ~ Brenda Overstrom, Layers of Meaning, showing at Art House Picture Frames, March 1st – April 28th. Artist Reception, Saturday, March 3rd, 3-5 PM

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Art House Picture Frames
61 Pleasant St, Portland, Maine 04101

Portland Museum of Art Opens “The Robbers: German Art In a Time of Crisis”

The Portland Museum of Art (PMA) opens The Robbers: German Art in a Time of Crisis today, February 23. The exhibition of 21 German prints executed between the World Wars highlights George Grosz’s 1922 lithographic suite The Robbers: Nine Lithographs on Maxims from Schiller’s “The Robbers” as well as artworks by other printmakers of the era, including Max Beckmann, Otto Dix, and Käthe Kollvitz. The works on display powerfully blend issues of history, politics, art, and national identity, provoking questions about who we are and what we value in ways that are as pertinent today as they were a century ago.

With the lithographic suite The Robbers: Nine Lithographs on Maxims from Schiller’s “The Robbers,” Grosz updated Friedrich Schiller’s iconic 1781 play of the same name, depicting the canonical story in the tumultuous climate of early 1920s Berlin in which he lived. With figures culled from the modern era, Grosz’s imagery suggests the vast social discord where the traumatic effects of the mechanized war, greed, industry, and poverty intersected to undermine national stability in the young Weimar Republic.

Grosz’s prints were part of a broader artistic culture in which other printmakers and theater directors produced modern interpretations of canonical of German literature, overtly politicizing the hallmarks of the nation’s cultural heritage. Their work, available to broad audiences through widely disseminated prints or stage performances, was a type of social intervention at a moment when conceptions of German identity vacillated wildly. The interplay between contemporaneous politics and historic literature highlighted the tensions between tradition and modernity, which strained German society and which remain continually resonant today across the world.

Many of the prints in this exhibition, including the Grosz series, represent a post-World War I aesthetic known as “New Objectivity.” Whereas German Expressionists of an earlier generation often depicted emotional responses to the modern condition, highlighting themes of angst, inner turmoil, and social alienation, the leaders of New Objectivity rooted their prints in a type of biting, provocative realism, often relying on satire and caricature. Because of their goals to be socially engaged artists shaping the national discourse, many of the artists working in these styles found the print medium to be especially efficient as prints could be disseminated more broadly than painting or sculpture.

The Robbers: German Art in a Time of Crisis, which opens in the centenary year of the end of World War I, turns our attention away from the conflict itself and towards the aftermath that defined the next two decades. These works, many of which are gifts to the PMA from David and Eva Bradford, add context to the social and artistic expression of the era and are equally probing in their evaluation of German society and national identity.

Focus Printmaking 2 at Greenhut Galleries

Holly Berry, Trail to the Top, Linocut, 10.5 x 10.5 inches

Holly Berry, Trail to the Top, Linocut, 10.5 x 10.5 inches

Focus Printmaking 2 is an invitational group exhibition featuring the work of Maine printmakers that runs from February 1-24, 2018 with an Artists’ reception on Saturday, February 3, from 1-3pm

Susan Groce, Labyrinth, Photopolymer etching, 19 x 15 inches

Susan Groce, Labyrinth, Photopolymer etching, 19 x 15 inches

Please join us for this exciting invitational printmaking exhibition. The participating artists employ a wide variety of printmaking techniques and many belong to Maine printmaking organizations including Peregrine Press, Circling the Square Press, Midcoast Printmakers, Running With Scissors, Wolfe Editions and Pickwick Press. They are recipients of prestigious residences and fellowships such as the Monhegan Residency, Vermont Studio Center, Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Heliker-Lahotan Foundation and Tamarind Institute. Several are professors at institutions including Maine College of Art, University of Maine and University of New England.

George Lloyd, Figure of Outward for Chas Olson, 3 color lithograph, 12 x 16 inches

George Lloyd, Figure of Outward for Chas Olson, 3 color lithograph, 12 x 16 inches

Featured Artists include: Karen Adrienne, Judith Allen, Susan Amons, Christine Beneman,
Holly Berry, Stephen Burt, Crystal Cawley, Kate Chappell, Edwige Charlot, David Driskell, Susan Groce, Adriane Herman, Christine Higgins, Alison Hildreth, Jon Imber, Elizabeth Jabar, George Lloyd, Larinda Meade, Sandra Quinn, Alison Rector, Carter Shappy, Neil Welliver, David Wolfe and Jeff Woodbury.
For more information visit www.greenhutgalleries.com

 

PMA to highlight intersectionality and inclusivity throughout 2018

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The PMA is committed to being an open, accessible, inclusive, and welcoming museum for all, and the exhibitions in 2018 reflect the full range of voices in our community and create experiences with art that strengthen our bonds and bring us together. In this spirit, 2018 exhibitions at the PMA highlight intersectionality and inclusivity in Maine.

Ann Buckwalter (United States, born 1987), The Republic of Hysteria (detail), 2017, Oil and gouache on paper, 91 x 92 inches. EX1.2018.21

Ann Buckwalter (United States, born 1987), The Republic of Hysteria (detail), 2017, Oil and gouache on paper, 91 x 92 inches. EX1.2018.21

The 2018 PMA Biennial
January 26 – June 3
Featuring more than 60 works by 25 participating artists, the Biennial highlights the diverse perspectives and interests of artists connected to Maine, and makes a powerful statement about art’s impact in this historical moment.

George Grosz (Germany, 1839–1959), "Lions and tigers nourish their young, ravens feast their brood on carrion... Series: The Robbers" (detail), 1922, Photolithograph on paper, 27 1/2 x 19 3/4 inches. Gift of David and Eva Bradford, 2002.53.6.5, Art © Estate of George Grosz/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

George Grosz (Germany, 1839–1959), “Lions and tigers nourish their young, ravens feast their brood on carrion… Series: The Robbers” (detail), 1922, Photolithograph on paper, 27 1/2 x 19 3/4 inches. Gift of David and Eva Bradford, 2002.53.6.5, Art © Estate of George Grosz/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

The Robbers:
German Art in a Time of Crisis
February 23 – July 15
Highlighting the complete portfolio of George Grosz’s 1922 The Robbers, this exhibition also includes provocative artworks by printmakers such as Max Beckmann, Otto Dix, and Käthe Kollwitz.

Image: Eliot Porter (United States, 1901-1990), "Apples, Great Spruce Head Island, Maine, 1942", dye transfer print, 15 15/16 x 12 1/8 inches. Gift of Maine Coast Heritage Trust, 2017.4.2

Image: Eliot Porter (United States, 1901-1990), “Apples, Great Spruce Head Island, Maine, 1942”, dye transfer print, 15 15/16 x 12 1/8 inches. Gift of Maine Coast Heritage Trust, 2017.4.2

Eliot Porter’s Nature
On view now through March 18
“Almost every photograph is about the external world, yet the work of few photographers has helped change that world. Eliot Porter helped alter both the medium and society. The extent of those changes now obscures the extent of his influence. “Eliot Porter’s Nature”…is a welcome reminder of just how exacting an artist he was.” – Boston Globe

Andy Warhol, Moonwalk, 1987

Andy Warhol, Moonwalk, 1987

Under Pressure:
Art from the 1980s
March 30 – August 10
A cross-section of diverse 1980’s aesthetics, revealing varied visual ways that the artists of this decade shaped and reflected the rapidly changing artistic and social realities of the time.

Ashley Bryan (United States, born 1923), "The birds' colors were mirrored in the waters," circa 2002, from "Beautiful Blackbird," collage of cut colored paper on paper, 11 5/16 x 20 inches. The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, Amherst, Massachusetts.

Ashley Bryan (United States, born 1923), “The birds’ colors were mirrored in the waters,” circa 2002, from “Beautiful Blackbird,” collage of cut colored paper on paper, 11 5/16 x 20 inches. The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, Amherst, Massachusetts.

Painter and Poet: The Art of Ashley Bryan

August 3 – November 25
Bryan has committed himself to filling the void of black representation in children’s literature by creating books about African and African American experiences. This exhibition highlights the breadth of the Maine-based artist and author’s creative output.

Winslow Homer - Looking out to Sea, Cullercoats (1882)

Winslow Homer – Looking out to Sea, Cullercoats (1882)

Americans Abroad
August 17 – TBD
Composed of magnificent works by artists such as Winslow Homer, John Singer Sargent, Mary Cassatt, and others, Americans Abroad will examine watercolors, prints, and paintings by American artists who traveled to Europe for training and inspiration in the late 19th century.

Clarence H. White (United States, 1871–1925), Drops of Rain [Dew Drops] (detail), 1902, platinum print, 20.2 x 14.9 cm. Library of Congress

Clarence H. White (United States, 1871–1925), Drops of Rain [Dew Drops] (detail), 1902, platinum print, 20.2 x 14.9 cm. Library of Congress

Clarence White and His World: The Art and Craft of Photography, 1895–1925

June 22 – September 16
This exhibition is the first in over 40 years to survey the work of Clarence White (United States, 1871–1925), a founding member of the Photo-Secession, a gifted photographer known for his beautiful scenes of quiet domesticity and outdoor idylls, and a major teacher and mentor. It will survey White’s career from its beginnings in 1895 in Newark, Ohio, to his death in Mexico in 1925.

Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988)

Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988)

Beyond the Pedestal: Isamu Noguchi and the Borders of Sculpture
October 5 – January 6, 2019
Japanese-American modernist Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988) reimagined the possibilities of sculpture as he experimented endlessly with the intersection of objects, people, and space over the course of his 60-year career. Beyond the Pedestal: Isamu Noguchi and the Borders of Sculpture examines Noguchi’s expansive artistic practice, and through approximately 40 sculptures and 10 works on paper, encourages visitors to to ask fundamental questions about what defines our understanding of sculpture. In addition to reflecting the myriad ways in which Noguchi self-consciously crossed modes of production, brought together artistic and philosophical ideas from across the globe, and played with form and function, Beyond the Pedestal also focuses on the ways in which he engaged with causes of social justice, forming a thorough examination not only of the renowned artist’s perspective on sculpture, but on the world itself.

For more information please visit www.portlandmuseum.org

ICA at MECA Presents ‘Off the Wall’

© Ryan Wallace, Slo Crostic, 2014. Susan Inglett Gallery, New York, NY. Courtesy of the artist and Susan Inglett Gallery, NYC.

© Ryan Wallace, Slo Crostic, 2014. Susan Inglett Gallery, New York, NY. Courtesy of the artist and Susan Inglett Gallery, NYC.

The Institute of Contemporary Art at Maine College of Art announces the opening of Off the Wall on Thursday, January 18, 5–7pm. Meet guest curator Jaime DeSimone and artist Ryan Wallace.

In 1966, German-born American sculptor Eva Hesse attached a seemingly simple long metal cord to a canvas that dramatically transformed a painting into a sculpture. Such a simple act revolutionized our understanding of what a painting could be. By privileging the painting’s marginal feature—the frame, its structural support — Hang Up transcends the medium’s inherent two-dimensionality.

© Rosy Keyser, Skeleton, 2017. Acrylic enamel, spray paint, and wooden beads, 80 x 72 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

© Rosy Keyser, Skeleton, 2017. Acrylic enamel, spray paint, and wooden beads, 80 x 72 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Curated by Jaime DeSimone, Off the Wall pays homage to Hesse’s groundbreaking work and investigates how contemporary artists continue to explore this liminal space between painting and sculpture. At times, a painting’s skin slides onto the floor or creeps onto the ceiling. In others, structural components protrude outward into the gallery space. As our spatial relationship with such works is reconfigured, objects on view in Off the Wall permeate into space and challenge our comprehension of both painting and sculpture. To provide an intimate perspective on this topic, Off the Wall will feature a range of works by two Brooklyn-based artists, Rosy Keyser and Ryan Wallace. A representative sampling of work will be presented by each artist to provoke thought about the shifting dynamics between painting and sculpture, or vice versa, as well as their collision.

 

For more information please contact MECA’s Director of Exhibitions and Special Projects, Erin Hutton, at 207.699.5025 or ehutton@meca.edu.

Greenhut Galleries Holiday Show

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Join us as we celebrate Greenhut’s 40th anniversary, its consistently fabulous roster of artists, and its proud distinction as Portland’s oldest year-round gallery.  Come by for a visit on Saturday, the 2nd of December 1:00pm to 3:00pm where refreshments will be served.
 
What’s your favorite arts and culture landmark of 1977? Fleetwood Mac Rumours? Star Wars? Beatlemania on Broadway? Ours is easily local legend Peggy Greenhut Golden establishing Greenhut Galleries in the Old Port! Join us as we celebrate Greenhut’s 40th anniversary, its consistently fabulous roster of artists, and its proud distinction as Portland’s oldest year-round gallery.
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Since the early 19th century, the rugged and intense beauty of Maine’s land- and seascape, as well as its famed quality of light have attracted and energized generations of artists. For them, Maine is both a geographic location and a site of artistic inspiration and creative freedom — a state of the union, but also a state of mind. Maine has been and continues to be vitally important to American art, and Greenhut is thrilled to play its part. In Peggy’s words, “It has been most gratifying for Greenhut Galleries to further the tradition of art in the State of Maine. We all work very hard at the gallery, but the artists we represent are the heart and soul of Greenhut.”
 
As the gallery has grown, so too, have the reputations of its artists, whose styles span the spectrum from realism to abstraction, with a wide range of subject matter in both two- and three-dimensional media. Greenhut represents a diverse group of over 30 Maine painters and sculptors, each selected not only for their technical skill, but also for his or her distinct voice and unique vision. The gallery is also proud to show work from the estates of Robert Hamilton, Maurice Freedman, Jon Imber, and most recently, Neil Welliver and Frederick Lynch.
 
Kelley Lehr and John Danos have implemented a strong social media presence with a long-term vision of dramatically expanding outreach and followship. They are planning big changes to the website in 2018 and special events, so stay tuned! To see of what’s in store this coming year be sure to visit our UPCOMING EXHIBITION page. Thank you for your patronage and we look forward to your next visit to the gallery.
 
 
PARTICIPATING ARTISTS
 
Joel Babb • Susan Barnes • Matt Blackwell • Mary Bourke
Jeff Bye • Thomas Connolly • Ed Douglas • David Driskell
Grant Drumheller • Maurice Freedman • Kathleen Galligan
Roy Germon • Alison Goodwin • Robert Hamilton
Thomas Higgins • Jon Imber • Tina Ingraham • William Irvine
Henry Isaacs • Sarah Knock • Margaret Lawrence
George Lloyd • Frederick Lynch • Alan Magee • Daniel Minter
Nancy Morgan Barnes • Colin Page • Tom Paiement
Roy Patterson • Stephen Porter • Roger Prince • Sandra Quinn
Alison Rector • Glenn Renell • Alec Richardson
Kathi Smith • Mike Stiler • Neil Welliver • John Whalley

New Works by Sandra Leinonen Dunn at Roux & Cyr International Fine Art Gallery

S.Dunn

Roux & Cyr International Fine Art Gallery invites you to see New Works by Sandra Leinonen Dunn titled, “Maine Impressions.”  Please join us for 
a Wine and Cheese reception on
 First Friday December 1 from 5:00 – 8:00. The exhibit runs through Dec 29.

Sandra Leinonen Dunn is a Maine artist who paints in an old world style. Her oil paintings are filled with emotion, atmosphere and vibrant brushwork. She pulls you into her compositions with sensual delicate light that dances in a sea of rich tones. She is a master of soft edges allowing one subject to morph subtly into another, creating a dreamy approachable painting. Dunn is a well known, accomplished and admired artist. She brings us a wonderful selection of Maine nature theme paintings. Capturing the rural settings with a strong focus on trees soaring to the skies, her latest paintings are powerful and captivating. Her passion for what she does comes through in her work. She will be present at the opening. Come meet the artist!

Our Studio Exhibit showcases the work of Pat Eltman. She has the heart of a florist and loves all things beautiful, including people. Her oil paintings shine with color from flowers to sunsets as some of her favorite subjects to capture. Often described as a diamond in the rough, her paintings have taken the same approach. With direct strong brushstrokes she maneuvers the paint until it transforms into something vibrant and beautiful. Come meet this magnificent lady if you don’t already know her.

Both artists will be present during the opening. The gallery is located at 48 Free Street
 in Portland. For more information, please contact the gallery at 207-576-7787 or www.rouxandcyrgallery.com

Linden O’Ryan Announces Upcoming Fairs and Shows

In a patch of darknes... play

In a patch of darknes… play

Linden O’Ryan is pleased to announce her upcoming fair and show schedule. All events will have original watercolor paintings, original cards, postcard books, printed cards and giclées of paintings.

Moonflow

Moonflow

The schedule is as follows:

DESIGNING WOMEN FINE ART AND CRAFT
November 4, 2017, Saturday, 9-4
Husson University, Bangor

ROOST CRAFT FAIR
November 11, 2017,  Saturday, 10-4
Moore Community & Conference Center, Ellsworth

SOUTHWEST HARBOR PUBLIC LIBRARY SHOW: Linden O’Ryan
December 1-30
Southwest Harbor
There is no official reception scheduled, but Linden will be at the Southwest Harbor Public Library on Friday December 1st, to greet you! 20% of the sales through the month of December go to the Library.

DESIGNING WOMEN FINE ART AND CRAFT
December 10, 2017, Saturday, 9-4
Ocean Avenue School, Portland
For more information visit www.lindenoryan.com

 

Nan Goldin’s Seminal Artwork Returns to New England

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The Portland Museum of Art is proud to host the first New England installation of Nan Goldin’s The Ballad of Sexual Dependency in more than 30 years. This seminal slideshow installation, considered one of the great works of art of the late 20th century, last exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City in 2016. The Portland Museum of Art exhibition marks the first time the Massachusetts-born artist has shown the work in New England since 1985, when it exhibited at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston.

The Ballad of Sexual Dependency—named for a song in Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill’s 1928 The Threepenny Opera—comprises nearly 700 photographs taken by Goldin of herself and her friends throughout Provincetown, Boston, New York, Berlin, and Mexico. In creating this diaristic account of her life throughout the 1970s and ’80s, a kaleidoscopic narrative of romantic longing, loss, intimacy, and breakups emerges, featuring both heterosexual and same-sex couples in raw, vivid honesty. In her own words, the work is about “creating a history by recording a history.”

The photography of Nan Goldin offers audiences a kaleidoscopic narrative of the breadth of the human experience. Beginning in the 1970s and continuing to the present, Goldin captures her world as it unfolds before her, resulting in a diaristic account of her life and the people and places that define it. Treating her camera as an extension of her own body, “creating a history by recording a history,” Goldin shields her memories from revision or erasure by preserving them permanently in photographic form. The result is an unvarnished, intimate, and honest glimpse into a full and nuanced life that has played out in New York City, Boston, Provincetown, and abroad, against the backdrops of nightclubs and drag bars, hotel rooms and hospitals, and more.

Organized by the Portland Museum of Art, Nan Goldin explores American artist Nan Goldin’s (b. 1953) use of photography as a means of communication, self-reflection, and poetic expression. For more information, call (207) 775-6148 or visit portlandmuseum.org.

Greenhut Galleries Features Thomas Connolly “Scenes I’ve Seen” featuring Fred Lynch in the side gallery

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Thomas Connolly’s exhibition, “Scenes I’ve Seen” runs from November 2 – 25 with an Opening reception Thursday, November 2nd from 5 – 7pm.  This exhibition highlights Connolly’s keen gift for capturing and conveying the mood of any given location, as well as his ability to shift with ease from tight, detail-driven though painterly realist observations of architectural subjects to loose, lively and impressionistic land- and seascapes. Whether laboring in the studio on his architectural paintings or en plein air on his scenes of nature, Connolly’s stated goal is “to convey an emotional sense of place that is consistent with all the work I do. I want my paintings to have a sensual combination of colors that makes them feel like there is light coming from within the paintings, and this all comes from adjustments and balances within the work.”

With regard to his cityscapes, Connolly wants “to make the paintings look the way a city feels.” In this he is quite successful. As arts writer Mariel Melnick observes, “Connolly’s paintings are entirely realistic, but they are so much more. They contain brilliant, lyrical touches of paint that stand out like high notes in prominent harmonies. . .His paintings represent atmospheric light and emit their own luminosity. And instead of allowing architectural prestige and iconography to occupy the spotlight, Connolly forces them to succumb to the mood and atmosphere of his paintings. He deliberately chooses to paint identifiable sights, which are subsequently overshadowed by their painterly rendering.”

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In the side gallery this month, Greenhut is pleased to announce its first exhibition of works from the estate of one of Maine’s most celebrated abstract artists, Frederick Lynch. His obituary states, “In a career spanning more than 50 years, Lynch pursued a singular vision that began with the observed world and went deep into the underlying structure of appearances.” This exhibition features a group of Lynch’s sculptural segments, with each displayed beside a gouache on paper representation of itself. The works on paper feel a bit like architectural specs and are, in Lynch’s own words, “almost obsessively accurate” renderings of the geometric oil and enamel on pine segments they represent. “I tried to translate every nick, every texture,” he says. Though Lynch’s method is systematic, it is not formulaic. Lynch’s aesthetic is drawn from the ordered chaos of nature, his shapes a bit quirky. “Deviations, mutations, and the unexpected” are welcome advents, staving off predictability. “Art,” Lynch says, “is perhaps the most interesting subject there is to me, and my art the most interesting of that—not out of ego, certainly, but out of curiosity. I make art to see what happens.”

These two and three dimensional renderings of each respective form are separately and independently beautiful; the combined effect is not only beautiful, but also fascinating. Observing each segment as it confronts its own image, the viewer is invited to contemplate the transformative effects of media, scale, and dimensionality. But philosophical ponderings are not at all necessary to appreciate the exhibition. As Lynch puts it, “My art is about aesthetics. All other positive associations, invocations, or implications are bonus points, incurred with the advantage of a second look.”

Greenhut Galleries located at 146 Middle Street, Portland is open Monday through Friday 10:00 – 5:30 and Saturday 10:00 – 5:00. For more information visit www.greenhutgalleries.com or call 207.772.2693.

Work from Maine’s Craft Apprentice Program on display at Caleb Johnson Studio

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The Maine Craft Association’s Craft Apprentice Program (CAP) offers Maine-based master craft artists and apprentices the opportunity to learn, create and connect. The 2017 Craft Apprentice Program will celebrate with capstone exhibition on view at Caleb Johnson Studio, 110 Exchange Street, Portland, Maine October 3-31, 2017.

Please join us for the artist reception and refreshments
October 6th, 4-7pm
during the Portland First Friday Art Walk!

Apprentice Cara Taggersell

Apprentice Cara Taggersell

In 2017, the two master-apprentice pairs selected through a competitive application process were glass artists, the exhibition will feature new glass work created during the 2017 seven month apprenticeship.

Exhibiting Artists:

Ben Coombs
Charlie Jenkins
Carel Shonerd
Cara Taggersell
Terrill Waldman

CAP is a program of the Maine Crafts Association in partnership with the Maine Arts Commission. Maine Magazine is the exclusive magazine sponsor of the CAP exhibition. Caleb Johnson Studio partners with CAP to host the exhibition.

For more information contact Sadie Bliss, MCA Director  at 207-205-0791 or sbliss@mainecrafts.org

Higgins, Welliver & Lloyd: Opening reception at Greenhut Galleries

J. Thomas R. Higgins

J. Thomas R. Higgins

Greenhut Galleries presents an exhibition of three incredible Maine artists from October 5th through 28th with an opening reception Thursday, October 5th from 5 – 7pm.

Growing up in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, J. Thomas R Higgins’s earliest exposure to art was the work of Edward Redfield, Daniel Garber and related Pennsylvania Impressionists. Later, as a college student, principal influences were Van Gogh, Kokoschka, Abstract Expressionists and other painters with a romantic vision. For more than four decades Higgins’s paintings have responded to the Maine landscape with passion and a personal viewpoint.

“As a painter, what I find most interesting is the dialogue between perception and the act of painting, how a gesture of paint can become the equivalent of what is observed and subjectively transformed. Painting for me is an active and intuitive process of participating in natural spaces. By working on site through direct sensory experience, I hope to achieve a dynamic, animated, and painterly response to a subject that is often untamed and in flux.”

This exhibition consists of paintings produced during a residency at Maine Farmland Trust’s Joseph A. Fiore Art Center in Jefferson, Maine during the summer of 2016. The residency provided me with the opportunity to immerse myself in the rustic landscape from North Whitefield to Nobleboro, Maine—a subject matter to which I related unabashedly and enthusiastically.

Neil Welliver

Neil Welliver

This month Greenhut is also thrilled to announce its first exhibition of works by Neil Welliver. Welliver’s huge oil paintings of the Maine landscape are considered by art critic Robert Hughes to be “among the strongest images in modern American art.” While this exhibition includes oil paintings, it is primarily designed to celebrate the artists’ talents as a printmaker. The ten selected prints showcase Welliver’s use of the following media in creating an intuitive yet precise vision of the wild natural world: etching (using the difficult, laborious aquatint process) and woodblock (created in the intricate, exacting and time intensive Japanese tradition of ukiyo-e).

As former US poet laureate Robert Strand notes: “The world of the prints seems more vulnerable than that of the paintings. In fact, it seems oddly, radically poised for dissolution. Subjects are singled out, regarded, and given, finally, a painstaking mortal presence, reminding us that what we see will come to an end and that nothing in nature will last. It is on this that their lyric character depends, this terrible, gratuitous knowledge of limitation by which we make things matter.”

Neil Welliver was born in Pennsylvania in 1929 and lived in Maine for 35 years prior to his death in 2005. He received his BFA from Philadelphia Museum, College of Art and his MFA from Yale School of Art. He taught at Yale and the University of Pennsylvania, where he served as chairman the Graduate School of Fine Art from 1966 to 1989. Welliver’s works are included in many major museum collections, including Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, as well private collections worldwide.

George Lloyd

George Lloyd

This month our side gallery show will feature works by George Lloyd. These paintings were made in the 80s and 90s, following the artist’s move to Maine from the San Francisco Bay Area, where he had spent the previous 13 years as both painter and teacher.

The 8 works included in the present exhibit were selected in part on the basis of their Maine-centric palette. As poet and critic W.S. DiPiero puts it: “George Lloyd has lived west and east, and different weathers coexist in his work to strong, sometimes disturbing effect, especially in the paintings he has made while living in Maine. While haunted by Bay Area light, his work has also been infused with New England’s brutally changeful weather.” Lloyd’s paintings are marked by their exuberant vitality, and a brand of sensuality that incorporates both masterful brushwork and an extraordinary command of color.

George Lloyd received his BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design and his MFA from Yale School of Art. In 1969, he moved to Berkeley to teach at the University of California. There he met and was befriended by Elmer Bischoff, a leader of the Bay Area Figurative Movement, with whom he drew from the figure model in weekly drawing sessions in a group that also included the painter Joan Brown.

Lloyd has received grants from the Pollack-Krasner Foundation in 1994 and 2006, and the
Elizabeth Foundation in 1995. He was a Visiting Artist at the American Academy in Rome in 2002. His work is included in numerous museum collections as well as private collections both here and abroad.

For more information call 207-772-2693 or visit greenhutgalleries.me

Tina Ingraham and Roy Germon at Greenhut Galleries

Tina Ingraham, Source, 24 x 50 inches, oil on linen

Tina Ingraham, Source, 24 x 50 inches, oil on linen

Tina Ingraham’s Rocks, Trees, Sand & Sea: Popham to Blue Hill will be on display September 7th – 30th, 2017 with an opening reception Thursday September 7th, 5-7pm. Roy Germon featured in the side gallery.

Tina Ingraham’s inspiration for her most recent group of paintings is the Maine landscape. She finds beauty in the subtleties of the world around her and in the paint itself, pushing and pulling the paint with the use of palette knife and brush. Tina was classically trained and received her MFA from Brooklyn College of CUNY in 1996 and holds a BS in Design from the University of Cincinnati. As a John Simon Guggenheim Grant recipient, Ingraham painted in Italy and traveled Europe from 1999 to 2003 to study master paintings integral to her work. She is also the recipient of the Maine Commission for the Arts Project Grant, the Pollock Krasner Foundation Award, and the Milton and Sally Avery Fellowship. She has been an educational instructor at Bowdoin College, Stephens College, Maine College of Art and Brooklyn College, where she received a teaching fellowship and the Charles G. Shaw Award for Excellence.

 

Roy Germon

Roy Germon

Recent work by Roy Germon will be featured in our side gallery this month. Germon attended the School of the Visual Arts in NYC where he received his BFA in 1990. During his 20-year tenure in NYC he worked as a freelance illustrator and a conservator of fine art and original prints. In 2003 he moved to Portland, Maine with his wife, son and daughter. Inspired by the Maine landscape, he took up painting, dominating his canvases with energetic brushstroke and bold line.

Gallery hours are Monday to Friday 10am – 5:30pm and Saturday 10am – 5pm. For more information please call (207) 772-2693 or visit www.greenhutgalleries.com

2017 Bernard Osher Lecture “Keeping Tradition Alive” at the PMA

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The Portland Museum of Art is excited to announce Theresa Secord as the 2017 Bernard Osher Lecture speaker. The event, titled Keeping Tradition Alive: Native American Art Ecology in Maine and the Nation, will take place at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, September 12, at USM’s Hannaford Hall. Tickets are $15, $10 for PMA members, and $5 for students. They are available here and through portlandmuseum.org.

Named a 2016 National Heritage Fellow by the National Endowment for the Arts, Theresa Secord is an activist, arts preservationist, and renowned artist with work in the PMA collection. She has led creative change throughout Native American communities since 1988.

It wasn’t long ago that one of Maine’s oldest art forms—ash and sweet grass basketry—was in danger of disappearing entirely. Activists and advocates from the Passamaquoddy, Penobscot, Maliseet, and Micmac tribes, led in part by Secord, saved the tradition through a long, hard-fought struggle, preserving a crucial piece of the region’s cultural heritage.

For more information, visit portlandmuseum.org.

MECA Announces Alysha Kupferer as New MECA Program Chair

Industry Professional, Former Art Lecturer Alysha Kupferer to Lead and Expand the Fashion & Textile Design Program

Industry Professional, Former Art Lecturer Alysha Kupferer to Lead and Expand the Fashion & Textile Design Program

Maine College of Art announced today that Alysha Kupferer will serve as the new Chair and Assistant Professor of the Fashion & Textile Design Program. Alysha’s interdisciplinary background represents a significant asset to our curriculum.

Alysha earned her MFA in Textiles from Indiana University–Bloomington and her BS in Apparel Design and Technology from Purdue University. She recently taught in the Fiber and Material Studies Department at the School of the Art Institute Chicago and was a resident artist at Water Street Studios in Batavia, Illinois, for the past two years. Alysha’s textiles-based installations and performances have been exhibited in both solo and group exhibitions. Her artistic practice investigates the relationship between consumers, products, and the economics of retail systems. In the interest of sustainability, she also researches natural dyeing methods and practices and finds and adapts traditional recipes for contemporary application.

“I could not be more excited to join the faculty at MECA and to lead this distinctive program that combines textiles knowledge with design for the body,” said Professor Kupferer. “As chair I aim to align the Textile & Fashion Design program with MECA’s core principles of civic engagement and creative entrepreneurship to build a unique program with an ethical core.”

Ian Anderson, MECA’s Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, said,
“Alysha’s interdisciplinary career spans fashion, textile art, sustainability, and technology. As an educator and program chair, her goal is to push education forward by combining the strengths of emerging technology with the traditions of the hand, with respect to cultures who have passed down knowledge on which our understandings are based.”

The only program of its kind in America, MECA’s Textile & Fashion Design major imparts a deep understanding of the design and fabrication of textiles, extensive study of the field of apparel, and exploration of creative expression through the omnipresent medium of fashion. Launched in 2013, it was made possible thanks to the generous support of Maine-based philanthropist Roxanne Quimby.

For more information visit meca.edu

2018 PMA Biennial Curator Shares Exhibition Strategy

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Nat May, the independent curator of the 2018 PMA Biennial, has assembled a team of arts professionals to co-curate the exhibition, which opens at the Portland Museum of Art on January 26, 2018. Together with May, this team will share knowledge, discuss themes, and ultimately select the artists that will appear in the PMA’s hallmark exhibition of contemporary art related to Maine.

The team members are:
· Theresa Secord, renowned artist, educator, and founder of the Maine Indian Basketmakers Alliance
· Sarah Workneh, Co-Director of Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture
· Mark Bessire, the Judy and Leonard Lauder Director of the Portland Museum of Art

The idea of bringing people together to share ideas about the Biennial appealed to May immediately upon agreeing to curate the exhibition. “What makes Maine so unique is the interconnected relationships between individual artists, communities, and organizations in the arts,” says May. “Working with Sarah, Theresa, and Mark leverages those relationships, and their varying insights and approaches to contemporary art creates a really exciting list of artists to consider.”

In addition to May and Bessire, Secord and Workneh also have connections to the PMA beyond the 2018 Biennial. At the Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture, Workneh worked closely with the PMA for the 2016 exhibition Skowhegan at Seventy, which commemorated the 70th anniversary of the school’s founding and showcased work produced at the school or in its honor. Secord participated as an artist in the museum’s previous Biennial and has work in the PMA collection. She is also the 2017 speaker at the museum’s annual Bernard Osher Lecture Series; her lecture, “Keeping Tradition Alive: Native American Art Ecology in Maine and the Nation,” takes place on September 12 at USM’s Hannaford Hall.

Working as a team benefits the exhibition, as May and his colleagues make studio visits across the state and beyond, talking with artists who have meaningful relationships with the state. “We’re taking the idea of connection seriously—the definition of ‘meaningful’ should pass the straight-face test,” adds May. “But it’s also important to understand that this exhibition, though regional by nature, should not be defined by regionalism. Our border is permeable, and our world in Maine intricately connected to the world beyond our state lines.”
One focus for the group is artists who have never been represented at the PMA before, including past Biennials, exhibitions, or the museum’s collection. These may be artists who have shown extensively elsewhere or are relatively unknown, but it is important to May to use the Biennial to bring artists and artworks to the PMA for the first time.

This is the 10th Biennial exhibition at the PMA and the second Biennial that will be organized by an independent curator who will spend nearly a year visiting artist studios. Funded through the generous bequest of William E. Thon, the PMA Biennial is intended to highlight artists with meaningful connections to Maine and enrich the cultural lives of the people of the state. Inspired by his own experience and love of biennials, Thon entrusted the PMA with the means to offer rich contemporary art experiences to its audiences. You Can’t Get There From Here: The 2015 Portland Museum of Art Biennial was curated by Alison Ferris of Edgecomb, Maine.
The 2018 Portland Museum of Art Biennial is made possible by the William E. and Helen E. Thon Endowment Fund.

The PMA is located at Seven Congress Square in downtown Portland.
For more information, visit portlandmuseum.org.

New Alan Magee paintings at Greenhut Galleries

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Alan Magee, born in 1947 in Newtown, Pennsylvania, attended art school in Philadelphia and, in 1969, began working as an editorial and book illustrator in New York. Among his regular clients were Time, Atlantic, New York Magazine, The New York Times, and Bantam, Ballantine, and Simon & Schuster Books. He received numerous awards for his illustrations including the National Book Award, Awards of Excellence from the Society of Illustrators and many more. Magee began to concentrate on personal paintings in the late 70s and in 1980 had his first solo exhibition at Staempfli Gallery in New York.

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His painting career took off, and in 1991 he had a ten-year retrospective simply titled, Alan Magee 1981-1991. The show traveled to four US museums. Other retrospectives have been hosted by the James A. Michener Art Museum, the Farnsworth Art Museum, the Museum of Texas Tech University, and the Frye Art Museum.

Magee’s paintings are in many public collections including The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, The Art Institute of Chicago, The National Portrait Gallery, the Portland Museum of Art, the Farnsworth Art Museum, Arkansas Art Center, Arizona State University Art Museum, The Newark Art Museum, and the Columbus Museum of Art. For more information visit www.greenhutgalleries.com

Art House Picture Frames call for provocative art

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Art House Picture Frames is looking for collections of provocative art for upcoming gallery shows at their space in Portland, ME. Work should say something about the world in which we live or comment on the artist or the art process itself. Interested artists should email links to arthousepictureframes@gmail.com or stop by Art House Picture Frames, 61 Pleasant Street, Portland Maine. Emerging artists are encouraged to submit.

Greenhut Galleries presents New Work by Colin Page

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Colin Page, Hanging Buoys, oil on canvas, 36×48 inches

 

Greenhut Galleries presents New Work by Colin Page, his 4th solo exhibition at the gallery. The opening reception is Thursday August 3rd from 5-7pm.

Colin says this about his work, “These paintings are about where land and water meet. Some of the landscapes are about the colors along the coastline, and others are about how our waterfront engages land and sea. Whatever the subject, color and light are my main attraction to a scene as I start painting. This show is about visual decadence. Whether I’m painting pattern and light, or the chaos of a working harbor, I experience the world through color, shape and line.”

In addition to making art, Colin Page teaches a number of painting workshops across the state.  Colin attended the Rhode Island School of Design and holds a BFA from Cooper Union in New York City.

Announcing the 2017 Portland Fine Craft Show

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The Maine Crafts Association presents the 3rd Annual Portland Fine Craft Show on August 26, 2017 on Congress Street in Portland. The show features over 100 juried fine craft exhibitors from the greater New England area. We’re grateful for support from our event sponsors, including MECA, DOMAINE, West End News, Artscope, CyberCopy, Daunis Fine Jewelry, El Corazon, Portland Pottery and Kurier. Please save the date and join us for shopping and communing with artists from all over Maine and greater New England.

Want to check out the show from behind the scenes? Help us make the show a great success again this year by volunteering at the Show. Join our delightful crew of artists and art lovers – sign up via the link below!

NEW this year: Look out for a very special show program and map, which will be published on August 4 as an insert to the West End News.

For more information visit The Maine Crafts Association webpage.

Portland Museum of Art presents Winslow Homer Studio Tours

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The Maine that you know and love started with Winslow.

Before Winslow Homer arrived at Prouts Neck, no artist had connected Maine to the world’s popular imagination to the extent that he would soon after. His imagery depicted the region with uncommon passion, and drew artists and curiosity seekers to the state in a pilgrimage that continues today.

Discover the place where it all began: the Winslow Homer Studio—restored and preserved exactly as it was when he lived in it. Explore the creaky floorboards, craggy shores, and unparalleled beauty of one of most important locations in American art history, and connect with the Maine all over again. For more information visit www.portlandmuseum.org/homer

Portland Museum of Art Announces Grand Opening of the David E. Shaw and Family Sculpture Park

Sculpture Park Opening

On July 7, the Portland Museum of Art will open the David E. Shaw and Family Sculpture Park in the Joan B. Burns Garden with a community celebration. Taking place on First Friday and featuring food trucks, live music, raffles, art-based activities, and much more, the grand opening of the David E. Shaw and Family Sculpture Park will be the arts and cultural event of the season.

In addition to the grand opening, the entire museum will be free and visitors will be encouraged to take their PMA Summer of Sculpture experience from the Park to the major exhibition inside, A New American Sculpture, 1914-1945: Lachaise, Laurent, Nadelman, and Zorach.
The David E. Shaw and Family Sculpture Park in the Joan B. Burns Garden not only makes outdoor art, a crucial and unique part of the PMA collection, more available to everyone, but it also improves quality of life in Portland, creating a green space where anyone can have quiet moments with world-class works of art at any time during museum hours. The grand opening event also serves as the unveiling of the latest addition to Portland’s outdoor arts landscape and a new major work in the PMA collection: Jonathan Borofsky’s Human Structures (24 Figures Connected).

The Joan B. Burns Garden has incorporated sculpture since Celeste Roberge’s Rising Cairn was installed there in 2000. Since then, the PMA acquired Anthony Caro’s Moment in 2012 and John Bisbee’s Hearsay in 2016. Aside from specific events, however, the public has never been allowed access to the Garden; visitors to the PMA could only admire the works from viewing points throughout the inside of the museum or the sidewalk on High Street. Thanks to Shaw’s gift, the Garden will be open to anyone during PMA hours May through December; whether they are visitors to the museum or simply out for a stroll in Portland.

For more information visit www.portlandmuseum.org

Henry Isaacs – Finding Values at Greenhut Galleries

 

Somes Sound from Sargent Drive, 36x24, oil on canvas

Somes Sound from Sargent Drive, 36×24, oil on canvas

We are thrilled to present Henry’s first solo show here at Greenhut Galleries. Educated at Rhode Island School of Design and the Slade School of Fine Art at University College in London, Henry has taught in numerous institutions and his work is in public and private collections around the world. Maine Sunday Telegram art critic Daniel Kany writes, “Isaacs painting is easy to like: it is jaunty, loose and bold……He is the master with the brush. He makes paintings that are appealing, vibrant but calm, so it’s easy to see the color virtuosity within them.”

The exhibition runs July 6 – 29, 2017 with an opening reception on Thursday July 6th, 5-7pm.

Minter

Recent work by Daniel Minter will be in our side gallery this month. Daniel is a painter and illustrator who uses his art as a tool for dialogue with his community. He is the co-founder
and creative visionary of the Portland Freedom Trail. His paintings, carvings, block prints and sculptures have been exhibited both nationally and internationally at galleries and museums.

Gallery Hours: Mon to Fri 10am – 5:30pm and Saturday 10am – 5pm. For more information call
207.772.2693 or visit www.greenhutgalleries.com

Greenhut Galleries presents “Henry Isaacs: Finding Values”

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Henry Isaacs “Somes Sound from Sargent Drive,” 36×24, oil on canvas

 

Greenhut Galleries presents “Henry Isaacs: Finding Values” July 6 – 29, with an Opening reception Thursday July 6th,  5-7pm

We are thrilled to present Henry’s first solo show here at Greenhut Galleries. Educated at Rhode Island School of Design and the Slade School of Fine Art at University College in London, Henry has taught in numerous institutions and his work is in public and private collections around the world. Maine Sunday Telegram art critic Daniel Kany writes, “Isaacs painting is easy to like: it is jaunty, loose and bold……He is the master with the brush.  He makes paintings that are appealing, vibrant but calm, so it’s easy to see the color virtuosity within them.”

Recent work by Daniel Minter will be in our side gallery this month. Daniel is a painter and illustrator who uses his art as a tool for dialogue with his community. He is the co-founder
and creative visionary of the Portland Freedom Trail.  His paintings, carvings, block prints and sculptures have been exhibited both nationally and internationally at galleries and museums.

Gallery Hours:  Mon to Fri 10am – 5:30pm
Saturday 10am – 5pm
207.772.2693

Art and Arias: Opera Maine at the PMA

Ahmed Alsoudani, Untitled (detail), 2013

Ahmed Alsoudani, Untitled (detail), 2013

The PMA is thrilled to partner with Opera Maine (formerly PORTopera) to present a special summer engagement. In this one-night-only performance, up-and-coming baritone Andrew Pardini and music director Timothy Steele from the company’s prestigious Studio Artist Program will look to the PMA collection for inspiration, and treat audiences to a diverse repertoire spanning genres such as classical, jazz, and musical theatre in response to the PMA collection. Join us as we pair artworks with arias!

Past musical events such as last fall’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream with the Portland Symphony Orchestra with Tim Rollins and K.O.S. and the PMA360 performance by BØRNS have been some of the most beloved recent programs at the museum, and Art with Arias continues the tradition of world renowned musicians introducing new ideas to audiences at the museum and connecting their craft with the PMA collection.

Thursday June 29 6:30 PM  –  8:00 PM; $10 for members; $20 general public

For more information visit www.portlandmuseum.org/events/art-arias

A New American Sculpture at PMA

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A New American Sculpture, 1914-1945: Lachaise, Laurent, Nadelman, and Zorach is the first exhibition to investigate the integral relationships between modernism, classicism, and popular imagery in the interwar sculpture of Gaston Lachaise, Robert Laurent, Elie Nadelman, and William Zorach. The exhibition, co-organized by the Portland Museum of Art and the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, explores how this circle of European-born artists became preeminent figures of modernism in the United States. By juxtaposing their works, A New American Sculpture reveals the confluences of sources—from archaism and European avant-garde art to vernacular traditions and American popular culture—that informed these artists’ novel contributions to the history of sculpture. Assembled from public and private collections, this exhibition of approximately 60 sculptures and a number of preparatory drawings addresses the remarkable affinities between the oeuvre of four divergent personalities, who redefined sculpture’s expressive potential during the turbulent interbellum period.

Gaston Lachaise (1882-1935); Woman Seated; 1918, cast 1925; Bronze with nickel plate; Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Purchase with funds provided by the Council of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art; 2007.8

Gaston Lachaise (1882-1935); Woman Seated; 1918, cast 1925; Bronze with nickel plate; Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Purchase with funds provided by the Council of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art; 2007.8

The exhibition is on view at the Portland Museum of Art from May 26, 2017 to September 8, 2017. The exhibition has been organized by the Portland Museum of Art, Maine, and the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. For more information visit https://www.portlandmuseum.org/exhibitions/new-american-sculpture-1914-1945

Dan Graziano exhibit opens at Roux and Cyr International Fine Art Gallery

"are you ready to order?" , Dan Graziano, 12" x 16", oil on panel

“are you ready to order?” Dan Graziano, 12″ x 16″, oil on panel

Dan Graziano is happy to announce his upcoming solo show at Roux & Cyr International Fine Art Gallery which opens on June 2nd in Portland, Maine. Over twenty paintings will be featured sharing the themes of restaurants, cafes and street life. Sun dappled figures of waiters, sidewalk cafes and glistening wine glasses are depicted with bold, “juicy” brush strokes in an impressionistic manner creating an unfinished narrative for the viewer to define with their own story. With strong contrasts of light, shadow and color, these paintings were made to invite you into the world of food, wine and the lively characters who inhabit “café society.”

The gallery exhibition opens with a wine reception on June 2nd from 5:00 to 8:00pm.

The exhibition runs from June 2nd to July 6th. Roux & Cyr International Fine Art Gallery is located at 48 Free Street in Portland, Maine. For more information visit www.dangrazianofineart.com or www.rouxandcyrgallery.com

Mary Bourke’s “Small Things” at Greenhut Galleries

"Brothers" acrylic on panel 18 x 18 inches

“Brothers”
acrylic on panel
18 x 18 inches

Greenhut Galleries presents “Small Things”, a solo exhibition, June 1 – July 1, 2017  with an opening reception on Thursday, June 1st from 5 – 7pm.

Mary Bourke’s paintings, which focus on her childhood memories, are truly a delight to behold. In a recent article, when asked about the current subjects of her paintings Mary said the following: I ran across some old photographs that showed my parents, grandparents and all of us, there are nine siblings. I combined images, photographs and memories; I also developed a new style and technique, learning about layering colors and glazes. The paintings themselves have more depth although my bright colors haven’t changed.”

While it’s apparent that Ms. Bourke feels comfortable with experimentation and feels less restricted with her current work, she still treasures one thing that will never change: her affinity for nostalgia. We can see that when she talks about her pieces inspired by childhood memories, especially concerning her growing up on Long Island.

For more information call 207-772-2693 or email info@greenhutgalleries.com

Randy Eckard to exhibit at Richard Boyd Gallery

Randy Eckard ~ ‘Shades of Grey’ ~ Watercolor on Paper 15” x 21”

Randy Eckard ~ ‘Shades of Grey’ ~ Watercolor on Paper 15” x 21”

Richard Boyd Art Gallery opens a solo exhibition of paintings by noted watercolorist Randy Eckard on June 1 at 10 a.m. A trained commercial and fine artist living in Blue Hill, ME Randy’s career as a fine artist working exclusively with watercolors spans more than three decades. Eckard is known for his use of light and shadow, with the subject of most of his paintings being light and how it defines and shapes the scene before him. His iconic architectural landscapes are expertly detailed and capture the essence of New England. Randy’s paintings have won over 190 awards in watercolor throughout New England and the Southeast. His paintings are widely collected and included in numerous private and corporate collections.

The public is invited to meet Randy at a reception at Richard Boyd Art Gallery on Saturday, June 3 between the hours of 12:00 noon and 3 p.m. where he will be available to discuss his current series of paintings. The exhibit is open free of charge between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. daily through June 29, 2017. Additional days and times can be scheduled by appointment. For more information about the exhibit or reception please contact the gallery by phone at 207-712-1097, email info@richardboydartgallery.com or visit www.richardboydartgallery.com

Portland Museum of Art Announces Curatorial Promotions

Images (L to R): Diana Greenwold, Jessica May, Andrew Eschelbacher

Images (L to R): Diana Greenwold, Jessica May, Andrew Eschelbacher

 

Following the completion of the widely acclaimed reinstallation of its collection, the Portland Museum of Art is pleased to announce three promotions within its curatorial department. Diana Jocelyn Greenwold has been promoted to Associate Curator of American Art, where she will oversee the American art holdings in the PMA collection, including new acquisitions, and develop original exhibitions. Similarly, Andrew Eschelbacher has been promoted to Susan Donnell and Harry W. Konkel Associate Curator of European Art, where he will oversee the European art holdings in the PMA collection, including new acquisitions, and develop original exhibitions.

Both curators report to Jessica May, who has recently been promoted to Deputy Director and Robert and Elizabeth Nanovic Chief Curator. In her new role, May will continue to oversee the museum’s curatorial program, as well as its educational, preparatory, and collections management departments. Recent exhibitions organized by the PMA include The Mistress and the Muse: Selections from the Isabelle and Scott Black Collection(2017); Artist’s Choice: Photographs from the Collection of Judy Glickman Lauder (2017);Of Whales in Paint: Rockwell Kent’s Moby-Dick (2016); Unbound: Tim Rollins and K.O.S.(2016); Duncan Hewitt: Turning Strange (2016); and Georges Braque: Surface and Space(2016).

“We are all delighted and honored to deepen our commitment to the future of this great organization and to take on new and exciting roles with our terrific colleagues and Board,” says May. “With upcoming exhibitions ranging from the birth of modernist sculpture in America to the extravagant beauty of painter Hans Hofmann’s works on paper, and with such great initiatives in our Learning and Interpretation department, it’s an exciting time for all of us at the PMA.”

ABOUT THE PMA

With an extensive collection and nationally renowned exhibitions, the Portland Museum of Art is the cultural heart of Maine. The PMA boasts significant holdings of American, European, and contemporary art, as well as iconic works from Maine—highlighting the rich artistic tradition of the state and its artists. The museum brings it all to life with unparalleled programming. From special members-only events, Free School Tours, and a commitment to family activities, to PMA Films, curator talks, and exclusive tours of the Winslow Homer Studio—it’s all happening at the PMA.

Pathways by Jeff Woodbury on display at Vestibule 594

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Pathways by Jeff Woodbury will be on display from May 1st to May 30th with an opening reception on First Friday, May 5th from 5-8pm. Don’t miss it! This will be the final opening reception at Vestibule 594. Located at 594 Congress Street, this street-level gallery is a viewing glass for passersby and art enthusiasts alike.

“I work concurrently on a range of ideas in a variety of media. I grew up in a military family, as part of an invisible rootless tribe. The way I work reflects my nature and my nurture. My work and my life are paths crossing others, connecting and diverging, fashioning patterns of people and choices and ideas and feelings. It’s all in the mix.

It’s difficult to categorize my work as a whole. I usually work through ideas in series of related pieces, yet some stand alone. Sometimes ideas are set aside, only to be picked up years later.

I choose materials to express my thoughts, and the materials in turn suggest more ideas. My art lives not just in the final product, but in its making, and in its relation to other work.

I enjoy the freedom to explore where my ideas lead. I want to share the wonder I find. It’s not my intention to lead you to specific interpretations or conclusions. Words stand in the way of the direct experience of visual art. You’re part of the process now. Relax and enjoy.” -Jeff Woodbury

William Irvine & Nancy Morgan Barnes at Greenhut Galleries

William Irvine, Resting Fisherman, oil on canvas

William Irvine, Resting Fisherman, oil on canvas

 

Nancy Morgan Barnes and William Irvine are storytellers.
Irvine paints his stories in the place between the abstract and the real. Morgan Barnes leads us through narratives that are not what they initially seem. Born in South Bend, Indiana, Morgan Barnes received her undergraduate degree from St. Mary’s College in South Bend, Indiana, and her graduate degree from Indiana University.
Irvine grew up in Troon, Scotland and is a graduate of the Glasgow School of Art in drawing and painting. He moved to Maine in the 1960’s.

Nancy Morgan Barnes, Bear and Hare, oil on board

Nancy Morgan Barnes, Bear and Hare, oil on board

For more information contact Greenhut Galleries :
146 Middle St
Portland, Maine 04101
207-772-2693
www.greenhutgalleries.com

Artists reception Thursday, May 11 from 5-7pm
Exhibition on display May 4 – 27
Gallery Hours: Mon -Fri 10-5:30pm, Sat 10-5pm

Portland Museum of Art Names Curator for 2018 Biennial

Nat May, guest curator for the 2018 Portland Museum of Art Biennial

Nat May, guest curator for the 2018 Portland Museum of Art Biennial

The Portland Museum of Art is pleased to announce that Nat May is the guest curator for the 2018 Portland Museum of Art Biennial. Nat draws from a deep familiarity with Maine’s contemporary arts landscape through his 13 years as Executive Director of SPACE Gallery, one of the state’s leading venues for contemporary, emerging, and unconventional artists, and will bring together work from living artists with connections to the state for the exhibition. The Biennial opens on January 26, 2018.

“From our earliest conversations, Nat has impressed the staff at the PMA with the depth of his thoughtfulness and his commitment to being inclusive. His research is meticulous, his eye is keen, and his curiosity is unbounded. We are so honored to work with him,” says Deputy Director and Robert and Elizabeth Nanovic Chief Curator Jessica May (no relation), who curated the 2013 PMA Biennial.

A Cape Elizabeth native, Nat was a founding member of the Bakery Photo Collective and has also served as a Board member at Creative Portland and Portland Arts and Culture Alliance. Since 2014, he has served as a founding member of Common Field, a nationwide network of contemporary, experimental, and noncommercial visual art spaces, and as a founding Board member at Hewnoaks Artist Colony in Lovell, Maine.

“I am flattered by the invitation to work with the Portland Museum of Art on the 2018 Biennial,” says May. “The Maine arts community is rich and varied, and there are so many talented artists to consider. I am thrilled to have this new opportunity to invite conversation about contemporary art.”

The PMA’s Judy and Leonard Lauder Director Mark Bessire adds: “Through my time at the PMA, working with the city and community in Portland, and my work on the Board of Advisors at SPACE Gallery, I’ve gotten to know Nat well and admire the way he approaches art. I can’t wait to see what he does with the Biennial—it’s going to be something truly special.” For more information, please contact:
Graeme Kennedy
Director of Marketing & Public Relations
gkennedy@portlandmuseum.org
207.699.4887

Maine: The Way Life Is at Greenhut Galleries

Colin Page Waterfront Oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches

Colin Page
Waterfront
Oil on canvas
24 x 36 inches

Greenhut Galleries is celebrating its 40th year anniversary ALL YEAR, and what better way than to throw a full gallery invitational exhibit honoring the state of Maine. We are pleased to announce our upcoming exhibit of paintings by 50 local artists in our new biennial fondly titled: Maine: The Way Life Is.

It’s easy to see why artists have been coming to Maine for over 100 years. So many are drawn to the rugged coastline, the islands, the wild beauty and isolation of this majestic state. The landscape is an obvious inspiration and has been captured time and time again in classic works by some of the most skilled artists, from Winslow Homer to Andrew Wyeth, from Thomas Cole to Frederick Church.

rita Holmquist Last Light Oil on linen 24 x 36 inches

Brita Holmquist
Last Light
Oil on linen
24 x 36 inches

What interests us about many of these iconic scenes is how they translate to our contemporary culture. We have curated this invitational with artists who each have a unique vision of what “Maine” means to them. The result makes for an exciting, thought-provoking, dynamic and diverse exhibition!

Dedicated to showing the finest art made by Maine’s best artists, Greenhut Galleries is pleased to have you join us in celebrating our wonderful state of Maine. Discover something new, stay curious, LOVE ART.

The exhibit runs April 6-29 with an Artists reception, Saturday April 8, 1 – 3 pm. Gallery hours are Mon – Fri 10am – 5:30pm and Sat. 10am – 5:00pm. For more information please contact info@greenhutgalleries.com

Greenhut Galleries’ “Abstraction”

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Kayla Mohammadi

 

Abstraction
abˈstrakSH(ə)n
1. freedom from representational qualities in art
2. an invitational group show of 25 Maine artists at Greenhut Galleries in Portland
February 2 – 25, 2017

Please join us!
Artists reception, Saturday, February 4, 1 – 3pm

Daniel Anselmi, Chris Beneman, Grace DeGennaro, Ingrid Ellison,
Tom Flanagan, Alison Goodwin, Ken Greenleaf,
Jaap Eduard Helder, Elizabeth Hoy, Jon Imber, Penelope Jones, David Kelly, Richard Brown Lethem, George Lloyd, Frederick Lynch, Kayla Mohammadi, Lisa Noonis, Tom Paiement, Sandra Quinn, Noriko Sakanishi, Jenny Scheu, Claire Seidl, Lori Tremblay,  Dietlind Vander Schaaf, Willa Vennema

Greenhut

FMI,  www.greenhutgalleries.com
Greenhut Galleries
146 Middle Street
Portland, ME  04101
207-772-2693

info@greenhutgalleries.com
Gallery hours: Mon-Fri 10-5:30, Saturdays 10-5

Portland Museum of Art Announces Historic Gift

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The Portland Museum of Art is thrilled to announce that it has received the largest matching gift in the museum’s history. A gift of five million dollars will be donated to the PMA by longtime American museum benefactors Judy and Leonard Lauder to support the museum’s endowment. The Lauders’ generous gift is intended to inspire philanthropy in others for the PMA, and officially marks the beginning of the Focused Endowment Initiative—a targeted plan to increase the museum’s endowment by a total of $15 million.
To honor this historic gift and to recognize Judy’s long-term commitment to the PMA, the PMA Director position will be named the Judy and Leonard Lauder Director of the Portland Museum of Art.
Mr. and Mrs. Lauder made the following remarks: “We are overjoyed to be able to make this gift to the Portland Museum of Art in recognition of its sterling leadership—from Director Mark Bessire and Board Chairman Jeffrey Kane—to the extraordinary Board, museum staff, and volunteers, who have collectively made the Portland Museum of Art one of the leading regional art museums in the United States. While we recognize the importance of buildings, we also recognize the tremendous importance of economic stability for cultural institutions. We are confident that this gift, which focuses on the museum endowment, will greatly enhance and promote the financial integrity of this magnificent Maine institution.”
“This is a transformative gift and one of the largest in the history of the Portland Museum of Art,” said PMA Director Mark H.C. Bessire. “When we complete the Focused Endowment Initiative—spurred by the remarkable contributions of Judy and Leonard Lauder—the museum’s endowment will have grown to almost $40 million, thus providing the PMA with the stronger foundation it needs to effectively continue its mission.”
Prior transformative gifts to the museum include the gift of 17 Winslow Homer works from Charles Shipman Payson in 1979, the gift of the great Renoir and related Impressionist works of art from John Whitney Payson in 1991, and the $4 million bequest from William Thon in 2000.
“We are immensely grateful to Judy and Leonard for this remarkable act of generosity and confidence in our enterprise,” expressed Board Chairman Jeffrey Kane. “As the Lauder gift clearly demonstrates, the museum’s focus on improving the visitor experience with the collection has made a compelling case for continued investment. This historic and generous gift confirms the Lauders’ extraordinary commitment to the arts and strengthens the capabilities of the PMA to connect art to everyday life.”

The museum is located at Seven Congress Square in downtown Portland.

Winter Hours (beginning October 12): Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Thursday and Friday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Admission is $15 for adults, $13 for seniors, and $10 for students with I.D. Children 14 and under are always free. Admission is free every Friday from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. No admission is required to visit the PMA Café and PMA Store.
Winslow Homer Studio tours are available by reservation. For more information, call (207) 775- 6148 or visit portlandmuseum.org.

Holiday Show at Greenhut Galleries

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Join Us For The Holiday Show…
December 1- 31, 2016

We’re Having a Party!
Reception Saturday, December 3rd 1-3pm

Join us in celebrating the season and our Greenhut artists.
Welcome the new owners Kelley Lehr and John Danos.
Toast Peggy Golden with a champagne sendoff in appreciation of her vision, her tireless work on behalf of Maine artists, and her enormous contribution to the Portland art community as she embarks on her retirement.

Gallery Hours: Mon – Fri 10am – 5:30pm
Sat. 10am – 5:00pm
info@greenhutgalleries.com
www.greenhutgalleries.com

Sandra Leinonen Dunn opening at Roux & Cyr

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Roux & Cyr International Fine Art Gallery invites you to a solo exhibit featuring Sandra Leinonen Dunn. Please join us for wine and Cheese on First Friday December 2 from 5:00 – 8:00. This exhibit runs through December 30.

Sandra Leinonen Dunn Is a prolific Maine painter who is well known throughout the State. Her skills are admired for her beautiful colors, her soft delicate touch as well as her pronounced brushstrokes. She captures atmospheric conditions in nautical scenes and chiaroscuro (coming out from shadow into the light) in her still life paintings. She impresses with her depictions of porcelain and copper for her realistic yet emotional interpretations.

Leinonen Dunn brings us a varied collection of recent works. She will be present at the opening. Come meet the artist and enjoy her beautiful paintings.

Roux & Cyr International Fine Art Gallery is truly Uniting the World Through Art.

Our Studio Exhibit, also opening on December 2, will be showcasing the works of Portland’s Katharina Gifford. She focuses mainly on figurative works, portraits and still life. Trained classically at the Florence Academy of Art, her oil paintings reflect rich color and a deep understand of light.

Please join us for these two wonderful exhibits along with works of 25 artists from 10 different countries. Both artists will be present for the opening. We look forward to seeing you soon!

For more information contact: Susan Roux • 207-576-7787 • rouxandcyrgallery@gmail.com

Closing Reception for LINEATION by Chris Beneman at Vestibule 594

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Join us for the closing reception of Chris Beneman’s solo show “Lineation” at Vestibule 594 during the First Friday Art Walk from 5-8pm. This is your last chance to see the show on display for the public, so don’t miss it!

Vestibule 594 is a small showcase gallery that displays local artists’ work in bimonthly new shows. Open on First Fridays or by appointment only. Located on the ground floor next to Starbucks and across from Flea For All on Congress Street in Portland.

Lineation noun lin·e·a·tion ˌli-nē-ˈā-shən

the action of marking with lines
an arrangement of lines
In my printmaking work I create pieces based on architectural forms. These deconstructed urban landscapes teeter between order and disorder. In my paintings I combine and rearrange elements of the working waterfront, creating a kind of crazy quilt from the fishing shacks, pilings, buoys, rigging and boats.

Chris Beneman is a graduate of Bates College and has attended classes at Maine College of Art and Haystack Mountain School in Maine, The Art New England Workshops in Vermont and Ballinglen Arts Foundation in Ireland. Her work has been widely exhibited, most recently in the 25th anniversary exhibition of the Peregrine Press at the Lewis Gallery in Portland. Other recent exhibitions have been at the George Marshall Store in York and Greenhut Galleries and the Maine Jewish Museum in Portland. She has also been included in exhibitions at the Attleboro Arts Museum and South Shore Art Center in Massachusetts, The Center for Contemporary Printmaking, Norwalk, CT; The New Hampshire Institute of Art, Manchester, NH, Washington Printmakers, Washington, DC and the Center for Book Arts in NYC.

Ms. Beneman’s work is in many public and private collections including the Portland Museum of Art, The New York Public Library, the Colby College Museum of Art, The Farnsworth Museum, Bowdoin College Museum of Art, University of New England and the New Britain (CT) Museum of Art. She is a member of the Peregrine Press and the Boston Printmakers.

For more information: info@vestibule594.com

 

Greenhut Galleries Features New Work By Margaret Lawrence

Across the Water, oil on panel, 18 x 18 inches

Across the Water, oil on panel, 18 x 18 inches

Margaret Lawrence finds inspiration in images gathered from a variety of sources. Nature, personal experience, and a reflective, internalized response to her physical environment inform her tranquil and textured dreamscapes, which seem to exist at the horizon between the personal and the universal.

In Lawrence’s own words,”My paintings are developed by removing paint as much as by applying it. Through this layering, the give and take of paint, an image that was inspired by a specific place transforms into a sense of place.” This approach yields a rich image using layered surfaces with deceptively complex color and texture. Both the effect achieved and Lawrence’s process itself are evocative of dream formation, wherein specific personal memories undergo a similar cycle of abrasion and accretion before they wash up in our dreams. Stripped of literal meaning but enriched with latent content, they exist in the symbolic realm, just beyond the grasp of language, where boundaries soften and binaries dissolve….

About the new work:

These recent paintings are a further exploration of the interplay between water, land and sky. Grounded in the constancy of the daily cycles of the sun and tide, I am drawn to colors and textures at various times of day or year that tap a sense of wonder.

After working as a registered nurse until her children were school aged, Margaret decided to pursue a long-harbored interest in art, eventually earning a BFA at  Maine College of Art. In 2015, she was commissioned to create four large paintings for the Augusta Judicial Center’s permanent collection. In recent years she has participated in an artist residency at the International School of Painting and Drawing and Sculpture in Umbria, Italy. Her work is in many private and corporate collections in Canada, Great Britain, and throughout the U.S. Margaret has been represented by Greenhut since 1997.

New Work runs from November 3 – 26, 2016

Opening reception Thursday November 3rd 5-7pm

Gallery Hours:  Mon to Fri 10am – 5:30pm and Saturday 10am – 5pm 

For More Information call 207.772.2693 

Chris Beneman’s “Lineation” at Vestibule 594

The Iron Works

The opening reception for Chris Beneman’s solo show “Lineation” will be held at Vestibule 594 from 5-8pm during the First Friday Art Walk on November 4th. The show will be up from November 4 – December 31 with a closing reception on Friday, December 2nd. Vestibule 594 is located at 594 Congress Street and is open on First Fridays and by appointment only.

Lineation noun lin·e·a·tion ˌli-nē-ˈā-shən
1. the action of marking with lines
2. an arrangement of lines

According to Beneman, “In my printmaking work I create pieces based on architectural forms. These deconstructed urban landscapes teeter between order and disorder. In my paintings I combine and rearrange elements of the working waterfront, creating a kind of crazy quilt from the fishing shacks, pilings, buoys, rigging and boats.”

Chris Beneman is a graduate of Bates College and has attended classes at Maine College of Art and Haystack Mountain School in Maine, The Art New England Workshops in Vermont and Ballinglen Arts Foundation in Ireland. Her work has been widely exhibited, most recently in the 25th anniversary exhibition of the Peregrine Press at the Lewis Gallery in Portland. He has had other recent exhibitions throughout the Northeast.

Ms. Beneman’s work is in many public and private collections including the Portland Museum of Art, The New York Public Library, the Colby College Museum of Art, The Farnsworth Museum, Bowdoin College Museum of Art, University of New England and the New Britain (CT) Museum of Art. She is a member of the Peregrine Press and the Boston Printmakers.

For more information call (508)259-4632 or email info@vestibule594.com

Greenhut Galleries opens “Joel Babb: The Nature of Things”

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Fog, Surf Murmurs Hunter’s Head, 2016, oil on linen, 20 x 19 inches

The Nature of Things is Joel Babb’s first solo exhibition at Greenhut Galleries.  Babb began painting the Maine coast in 1975, during construction of his house and studio in Sumner, Maine. After discovering Mount Desert, he would visit the island in all seasons, painting that coastline as well. But eventually, Babb lost his zest for painting the storied coast of Maine, feeling it had been depicted so frequently it was no longer possible for him to see it as it really is. So, for a time, he stopped, though he did continue painting nature in the woods and brooks nearby.

Artist Talk Saturday October 22nd 1pm

For the past several years, Babb has returned to Acadia, finding new inspiration in the epic confrontation of sea, granite, pine, and clouds. He states, “It is as if the Maine woods were being ground away to the foundations by this meeting with the sea.  When the water is calm, the shoreline is still evocative of storms of unimaginable scale.  I love the architectonic structure of the rocks, and the opposing movement of the water as if resentful of the rigidity, the sway of light and atmosphere over everything.

The Lucretian vision of eternal forces and elements interacting comes to life for me in Mount Desert, in the geology, the weather, and especially the action of the sea with the land.  I’ve visited Acadia the day after a hurricane passed through and climbed Cadillac Mountain the day after an ice storm in February. Once on a foggy morning, I startled a deer herd on Ocean Drive, and when I stopped at my spot to continue a painting, long spider webs across the road told me I was the first to pass that way. No matter how many visit Acadia, nature is still the impressive narrative.”

Babb is equally known for his urban views. In his book, Nature & Culture:  The Art of Joel Babb, Carl Little writes, “He divides his time between country and city, continuing to explore both places even as he builds on his repertoire of subjects. . . .For Babb, realism represents a philosophy of art.  As such, he says, the realist painter is constantly discovering ‘new understandings new realizations’ of the mysteries of existence.  ‘Realism as a philosophy,’ he muses ‘suggests that a small corner of the universe, when rightly observed, may open up universal laws in action.’ A modern day Thoreau.”

Joel Babb is a graduate of Princeton and the Boston Museum School, where he taught for several years. He has also taught at Tufts and Harvard universities. His paintings have been exhibited in many museums and galleries throughout the Northeast and are in numerous prestigious corporate collections and in several museums, including the Fogg Museum of Harvard University and the DeCordova Museum in Lincoln, MA.

Brand new work at Greenhut Galleries

Greenhut Galleries at 146 Middle St in Portland announces new work. Gallery Hours are Mon -Fri 10-5:30pm, Sat 10-5pm

Glenn Renell

Violet Sky  36 x 30 inches, oil on canvas

Violet Sky 36 x 30 inches, oil on canvas

 

Henry Isaacs

Barge Landing, Eastern Prom  36 x 36 inches, oil on linen

Barge Landing, Eastern Prom 36 x 36 inches, oil on linen

 

Alan Magee

Impermanence and Continuity  63 x 78 1/2 inches, woven cotton tapestry

Impermanence and Continuity 63 x 78 1/2 inches, woven cotton tapestry

 

 

Alec Richardson

Edge of the Deepest Cove  8 x 8 inches, oil on canvas on panel

Edge of the Deepest Cove 8 x 8 inches, oil on canvas on panel

 

 

J. Thomas R. Higgins

Sunset Cove  14 x 14  inches, oil on panel

Sunset Cove 14 x 14 inches, oil on panel

 

 

Alison Goodwin

Indian Point, North Haven 36 x 36 inches, Mixed media on panel

Indian Point, North Haven 36 x 36 inches, Mixed media on panel

For more Information visit www.greenhutgalleries.com or call 207-772-2693

BUSINESS WORKSHOPS FOR ARTISTS

screen-shot-2016-10-05-at-6-25-34-amThe Arts Business Institute (ABI) and MCA in partnership with Maine College of Art (MECA) and Waterville Creates present:

BUSINESS WORKSHOPS FOR ARTISTS

Maine College of Art, Portland, ME October 22
Waterville Creates, Waterville, ME October 23

Tuition
Both Workshops: $250
One Workshop: $150

MCA Member Discount Codes
One-day $25 Discount for MCA Members, Enter code MCAMEMBER
Two-day $50 Discount for MCA Members, Enter code MCAMEMBERS

MECA Students and Alumni: Contact Jessica Tomlinson for a full scholarship.

For More Information Vist: http://www.artsbusinessinstitute.org/portland-waterville-maine/

“Dietlind Vander Schaaf: Exhalation” at Vestibule 594 Gallery

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“Exhalation”, a solo show by Dietlind Vander Schaaf, will be held at Vestibule 594 gallery at 594 Congress Street (next to Starbucks at the Hay Building) through October 29. The opening reception will be held on Friday, September 2 from 5-8pm.

Dietlind Vander Schaaf holds an MFA from the University of San Francisco and an MA from the University of Southern Maine. Her work has been described in terms of it’s focus on “showcasing the wax itself, encasing objects as if they were ancient artifacts” (Orlando Sentinel) and as the transformation of “disparate materials into elegantly simple compositions of pattern and grace” (Artscope magazine). She has exhibited her paintings nationally and is a recipient of the Award of Excellence from Encaustic Art Institute, the Emerging Artist Grant from International Encaustic Artists, and a Pace House residency from Maine College of Art. Vander Schaaf serves as president elect of New England WAX. She teaches workshops throughout New England.

Explore the streets of Portland with PMA Go

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On September 2, the Portland Museum of Art launched PMA Go, a web-based, art-collecting game inspired by Pokémon Go. Instead of capturing Wartortles, Kakunas, and Vileplumes, players can amass an art collection of Homers, Renoirs, and Wyeths that generates real world rewards. While many art museums—including the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Whitney Museum of American Art—have embraced Pokémon Go as a way to draw visitors into their museums, the PMA is the first art museum in the country to use the premise of Pokémon Go to get its art collection out into the community.

PMA Go invites users to explore the streets of Portland, Maine—one of the country’s top destinations with unparalleled restaurants, natural beauty, and top breweries—and discover the breadth of the PMA’s collection. As players amass their art collection by “catching” great works of art around town, they receive real world rewards from the museum, including free admission, free PMA Films tickets for members, and if they find all 18 works, a free copy of The Collection: Highlights From The Portland Museum of Art ($24.95 value).

Playing PMA Go is easy. No downloads or installation is necessary. Just visit PMAgo.org on your mobile device and begin collecting! The game is available to be played across the entire Portland peninsula. Share your collection with your friends on social, and collect your rewards by visiting the PMA. For More information on the current programming at PMA visit www.portlandmuseum.org

Greenhut Gallery Announces Fresh New Art in Inventory

Margaret Lawrence Porch View #3  5 1/2 x 5 1/2  inches gouache on paper

Margaret Lawrence
Porch View #3
5 1/2 x 5 1/2
inches gouache on paper

 

Mike Stiler Lunchline  13 x 38 inches  found wood & paint

Mike Stiler
Lunchline
13 x 38 inches
found wood & paint

 

Alison Goodwin   Island Bones  36 x 36 inches  Acrylic & oil pastel on panel

Alison Goodwin
Island Bones
36 x 36 inches
Acrylic & oil pastel on panel

 

Roy Germon Mountain River, Late Summer 24 x 24 inches acrylic on panel

Roy Germon
Mountain River, Late Summer
24 x 24 inches
acrylic on panel

For More Information Contact:

Greenhut Galleries
146 Middle St
Portland, Maine 04101 

207-772-2693
www.greenhutgalleries.com

Gallery Hours:  Mon -Fri 10-5:30pm, Sat 10-5pm

The MCA presents the Second Annual Portland Fine Craft Show

Clockwise from top left: Sonlight Creations, Tandem Glass,  Anne L. Brooks

Clockwise from top left: Sonlight Creations, Tandem Glass, Anne L. Brooks

The MCA presents the Second Annual Portland Fine Craft Show on August 27, 2016 9am-4pm taking place on Congress Street in Portland, Maine, free and open to the public. 

The show features 100 juried exhibitors from the greater New England area exhibiting contemporary fine craft in the following media categories: baskets, ceramics, fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, stone and wood.

Congress Street is closed to vehicles from Monument Square to Longfellow Square creating a festive day of art in craft in Portland, offering fine craft in the Portland Fine Craft Show and prints, photography and painting in the WCSH6 Sidewalk Arts Festival. 

The Portland Fine Craft Show takes place between State Street and High Street.

Clockwise from top left: Jennifer Nielsen Hand-Crafted Jewelry, Three Wheel Studio, The F.D. Kretchman Rod Company, C.A.S. Handmade

Clockwise from top left: Jennifer Nielsen Hand-Crafted Jewelry, Three Wheel Studio, The F.D. Kretchman Rod Company, C.A.S. Handmade

Whopaints announces upcoming show schedule

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TIDE AND WIND CREATE LIGHT 

Shimmering days of cool mist wafting off the water creating beyond count paintings. Pastels perfectly render the mist and layered lights of the sun on the sea.

SHOW SCHEDULE
August 11-13 Northeast Harbor Invitational
August 19 Okoto in the Garden at whopaints
September 17-18 CFAAM Bar Harbor, ME
October 8-10 Paradise City, Northampton MA
November 5 Designing Women, Bangor ME
November 18-20 Paradise City, Marlborough MA
December 1 whopaints Gallery Winter Harbor Shopping Night
December 10 Designing Women, Portland ME

Visit whopaints.com for more information

Greenhut Galleries presents Urban Exploration

Phun Factory, 22 x 28 inches, oil on linen

Phun Factory, 22 x 28 inches, oil on linen

JEFF BYE
Urban Exploration

September 1- October 1, 2016
Opening Reception  Thursday, September 1st.,  5 – 7pm
Gallery Hours: Mon- Fri 10-5:30, Sat. 10-5

About his work Bye writes, ” I have always been drawn to textured surfaces and the patinas that evolve over time on the exteriors and interiors of abandoned buildings to historic structures that are being renovated, to the Mom & Pop stores that have not changed since they opened decades before.  I’ve been determined to capture those moments in time before urban developers erase and take over their DNA forever.  Time is of the essence and time is a huge factor in trying to document these structures and neighborhoods that had a certain and unique character that was separate from other areas of their city.”Urban Exploration is Jeff Bye’s fourth solo exhibition at Greenhut Galleries and continues his ongoing exploration of unknown or ignored buildings before they disappear forever.  The focus of the exhibition concentrates on locations throughout the east coast (NYC, Philadephia, Portland, ME), as well as areas he has traveled to in Europe.

Jeff Bye holds a BFA from Rhode Island School of Design (RISD).  Through RISD’s European Honors program, he spent a year in Rome, Italy studying classical art and architecture.  He received his MFA at the New York Academy of Figurative Art. His formal education exposed him further to the work of artists like Henri Matisse, Pierre Bonnard and Lucian Freud, whose styles influence his work to this day. Bye has been awarded the distinction of Master Painter from The Copley Society of Art, Boston, MA, a professional credential organization.  At the time, he was the youngest master painter in the history of the organization.

For More Information:

GREENHUT GALLERIES
146 MIDDLE STREET
PORTLAND, ME  04101

207.772.2693 or 888.772.2693

info@greenhutgalleries.com
www.greenhutgalleries.com

Portland Museum of Art Announces New Sculpture Park

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Thanks to a generous donation by local business leader, philanthropist, and arts advocate David E. Shaw, the PMA will open the David E. Shaw and Family Sculpture Park in the summer of 2017.

It has long been a wish of the PMA to make the Joan B. Burns Garden—located on High Street and currently closed to the public except for specific museum programming—an outdoor sculpture park available for the entire Portland community to enjoy and explore. Through the Shaw family’s donation, the David E. Shaw and Family Sculpture Park will be accessible to all through a gate on High Street, free to the public, and open year-round during museum hours beginning in summer 2017.

“The Shaw family is pleased to play a leadership role in creating a public sculpture park at the Portland Museum of Art,” shares Shaw. “We do this with great appreciation of the benefit of art to society. This park will provide public access to an artistic oasis in a cultural center of our community.”    

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Inspired by the upcoming culmination of Your Museum, Reimagined, the PMA’s multiyear project based on improved experiences with the collection, Shaw—an avid collector of sculpture—saw an opportunity to support the museum and permanently impact the greater Portland community. His donation aligns with the direction of the PMA under its new five-year Strategic Plan, which seeks to actively find ways to make the museum’s collection, historic buildings, and campus accessible to all, and to be “a leader in the growth and vibrancy of Portland’s urban and cultural transformation, including the revitalization of the Congress Square neighborhood”.

Through this generosity, the Shaws provide a gift that enables Portland and its surrounding communities to enjoy and to engage with art in a truly unique, intimate, and beautiful setting free of charge—one of the only green spaces in the heart of the arts district. His gift also accelerates the PMA’s plans for more artwork in the park, including acquisitions to be announced later, which will be installed in the park prior to its opening in 2017.

For more information visit portlandmuseum.org or call (207) 775-6148

PMA – Finest in a Decace

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You’ve brought your out-of-town guests to see lighthouses and eat lobsters—make sure to bring them to the PMA for the full Maine experience.

Introduce them to O’Keeffe, Stettheimer, Torr, Zorach: Women Modernists in New York, named the finest PMA exhibition in a decade by the Boston Globe, and as one of the 17 American art shows worth traveling for by Artnet. Have a beer at the intersection of art and sport with our PMA360: “Museum Moneyball”. Start a summer’s day by relaxing with Yoga in the Garden.

There is no time like August at the PMA. Be sure to make the most of it.

For more information visit www.portlandmuseum.org or call (207) 775-6148

John Whalley’s Etudes at Greenhut Galleries

Anno 1841, egg tempera on panel, 15 3/4 x 11 1/2 inches

Anno 1841, egg tempera on panel, 15 3/4 x 11 1/2 inches

Etudes is John Whalley’s 7th solo exhibition at Greenhut Galleries.  This exhibition of paintings and drawings continues Whalley’s exploration of  reclaiming discarded tools, seashells, and other objects and giving them new life. His beautifully rendered images seem to instill, or rather uncover, an inner light within his subjects, be they still life or portrait.

About the show Whalley states, “The word étude is defined as “a small, intricate study”, and so it seemed an appropriate title for my most recent exhibition of new egg tempera paintings and graphite drawings. With the exception of one portrait, the show is made up of small, intimate compositions created from among the thousands of “orphaned objects” that inhabit the shelves of my studio. Some works allude to partly told stories that the viewers are invited to consider with their imaginations. Others are simple, detailed portraits of tools, objects or old photographs, with attention to their patinas, textures and the quality of light they are seen in.”

His work is in numerous  private and public collections including The Portland Museum of Art and the Colby College Museum of Art. He has participated in exhibits nationally.  A 30 year retrospective of Whalley’s work, In New Light,  was published in 2006

Gallery Hours:  Mon – Fri 10am – 5:30pm & Saturday 10am – 5pm 

For More Information:

Greenhut Galleries
146 Middle Street
Portland, Maine  04101
207.772.2693 
www.greenhutgalleries.com
info@greenhutgalleries.com

Meet the New Owners of Greenhut Galleries

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After 40 years, Peggy Greenhut Golden happily announces the sale and transfer of ownership of Greenhut Galleries to John Danos and Kelley Lehr of Los Angeles, California: “Greenhut’s longstanding success and contribution to the Maine arts community has been tremendously fulfilling, both personally and professionally. Over the years, Greenhut Galleries has been blessed with an incredibly loyal and hard-working staff, whom I regard as family. The stellar team I’ve assembled will remain intact. It has been a joy and an honor to help grow the careers of many of Maine’s most esteemed artists. The relationships I have enjoyed with my employees and the artists I have represented over the years — as well as with clients near and far — have been deeply rewarding. I’m thrilled to pass the baton and ensure that all I’ve accomplished will continue.”

Greenhut Galleries began in 1977 in a 300 square-foot space at 10 Exchange Street, under the name “Posters Plus.” In 1978 Peggy moved the business to the Mariner’s Church Building, opening with a Will Barnet show and changing the name to the Fore Street Gallery. A fire in 1985 decimated the business, burning original Miros, Picassos, Calders, and more. Rising from the ashes in January 1986, Greenhut Galleries took up residence at its current location, 146 Middle Street, where the gallery has continued to thrive.

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As for the new owners, acquiring Greenhut Galleries is a dream come true. Kelley said, “John and I are so grateful and excited for this opportunity to preserve and continue the legacy of Greenhut Galleries. Peggy has been incredibly supportive and generous with her time and her wisdom. Her invaluable input will be ongoing as we collaborate with her talented staff to ensure a smooth transition and build upon her tremendous success. All of the people we’ve met in Portland thus far have been remarkably warm and welcoming, and we cannot wait to begin our new life in this thriving city.”

John Danos, a native New Orleanian, has been a practicing litigation attorney for the past twenty years, spending most of that time in Los Angeles. Purchasing Greenhut Galleries with Kelley was a dream come true and an excellent opportunity to put his humanities degree, as opposed to law degree, to good use. John has spent countless hours on pro bono legal matters, fighting for the public good, and he looks forward to devoting his energy to the Portland community. He is currently a member of the Director’s Circle at the Portland Museum of Art.

Kelley is originally from Illinois, but has lived in Los Angeles, since 1997. She, too, worked in litigation for many years, as a legal assistant. She holds a BA in English from UCLA, and an MA in Humanities from the University of Chicago, where she focused primarily on poetry and critical theory. Her writing has been published in both the paper and online editions of Lana Turner: A Journal of Poetry and Opinion. She is currently a member of the Director’s Circle at the Portland Museum of Art.

For more information:
www.greenhutgalleries.com
146 Middle Street, Portland, ME | 207-772-2693 | info@greenhutgalleries.com

Atmospheric Firing: Pottery by Betsy Levine of Prescott Hill Pottery at Maine Potters Market

Betsy Levine Soda fired Platter

Betsy Levine Soda fired Platter

For the month of July, Maine Potters Market is featuring the work of Betsy Levine. Betsy’s pots are organic and earthy, with a sensuality that comes mostly from the materials she choses and the atmospheric firing techniques that she uses. Her forms are simple, yet graceful, revealing the complex surfaces resulting from the interaction of clay and fire.  

Betsy Levine Wood-fired Serving Bowl

Betsy Levine Wood-fired Serving Bowl

Two different firing methods create a complementary body of work. The wood fired pots are fired for 8 days, allowing fly ash, coals, and the strokes of the flame itself to caress the pots and create unique surfaces in a beautiful range of natural color, from blacks, browns and purples to oranges, golds and pale pearly greasy. The soda fired pots show off the natural colors of the clay itself played against restrained use of glaze which reacts with the soda atmosphere to produce subtle changes in light reflectivity and color variation. 

Betsy Levine wood-fired vase

Betsy Levine wood-fired vase

Betsy’s pots are made to be used, admired and loved. They may look like works of art but they can go from table to dishwasher and be used and enjoyed every day.

The Maine Potters Market is located at 376 Fore Street Portland, ME 04101.July hours: 10 – 9 daily. For more information please contact Betsy Levine at Prescott Hill Pottery 207 589.3399 or betsy@elementalpotter.com or visit her website at www.prescotthillpottery.com

Dance of the Tribes at Greenhut Galleries

Tom Paiement, Audience, 24 x 24 inches, mixed media

Tom Paiement, Audience, 24 x 24 inches, mixed media

Tom Paiement’s Dance of the Tribes is an exhibition of mixed media pieces inspired by his winter visits to Venice Beach, California. In 1965, Tom Paiement and 2 of his friends from college drove from Maine to California in his brand new convertible Corvair, across the Rockies, through Vegas, away from the east coast into the sunshine and space of California.  They landed in Venice Beach.

In the winter of of 2013, Tom returned to Venice Beach and spent a month living one block from the famous boardwalk where everyone is there to see and be seen.  When he came back to Maine he started his Venice Beach series using collage, paint,  graffiti, tight drawing, woodcuts, metals, to manifest the energy and complexity of Venice Beach and the sensual and titillating dance of the “tribes”.  His palette changed radically.  

As the late Phil Issacson once stated, “Tom Paiement’s paintings are always moving, always on the go.  They are powerful and masterly….so infused with energy.”

Alison Rector, "Bend in the River"Oil on linen21 x 24 inches

Alison Rector, “Bend in the River”Oil on linen21 x 24 inches

Side Gallery exhibit Alison Rector Shared Quiet:  In Celebration of Libraries

Since 2010, Alison Rector has visited and painted many of Maine’s public libraries.  There are 18 Carnegie libraries in Maine and Alison has set out to visit them all. This exhibition includes 13 of her library paintings.  The Rector painting of the Rockland Public Library now hangs in their foyer.  Alison Rector along with Kirk Mohney, Director of the Maine Historic Preservation Commission, will present a collaborative talk about the art and architectural history of purpose built libraries in Maine at the Portland Public Library on Thursday July 14, 2016 5-7pm.  They have presented this talk at four different venues around the state.

When asked about her process, Rector states “All of my paintings start with a pencil drawing, and then a grisaille underpainting (a black & white value study, the term grisaille coming from the French word gris for grey).  On top of this monotone underpainting ground, I add layers of color.  The luminosity of the oil paint builds, layer upon layer, sculpting the texture of the painting.”

GREENHUT GALLERIES
146 MIDDLE STREET
PORTLAND, ME  04101
207.772.2693 or 888.772.2693
Hours: Mon – Friday, 10-5:30, Saturday 10 – 5
Email info@greenhutgalleries.com or visit www.greenhutgalleries.com

PMA presents Innovators and Entrepreneurs: A Women in Business Forum

Florine Stettheimer (United States, 1871-1944), Picnic at Bedford Hills (detail), oil on canvas, 40 5/16 x 50 1/4 inches. Courtesy of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia.

Florine Stettheimer (United States, 1871-1944), Picnic at Bedford Hills (detail), oil on canvas, 40 5/16 x 50 1/4 inches. Courtesy of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia.

Thursday, July 28
6 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Free for members and employees of Corporate members; $8 general public
Bernard Osher Foundation Auditorium

Influential women have shaped the city of Portland throughout its history. In 1908, author and critic Margaret Jane Mussey Sweat forever transformed the PMA with her bequest of the McLellan House and the funds to build the L.D.M. Sweat Memorial galleries in her husband’s memory. As Portland evolves into a 21st century city and prepares for the next chapter in its history, prominent women throughout the business community remain at the forefront of expansion.

The PMA is proud to present a public forum featuring four such leaders, in conjunction with the exhibition, O’Keeffe, Stettheimer, Torr, Zorach: Women Modernists in New York. Moderated by Jennifer Hutchins, Executive Director of the Maine Association of Nonprofits, this conversation will center on the shared and differing challenges women face in navigating the creative and business worlds, the ways in which these women have found and maintained their voices, and the innovations they’ve applied to their respective industries in Maine and beyond.

Panelists:
Lisa DeSisto, CEO at Maine Today Media
Leeann Leahy, CEO at The VIA Agency
Sarah Peterson, MD, Ph.D., Research Fellow at the Myocardial Biology & Heart Failure Lab, Maine Medical Center Research Institute
Elizabeth Whelan, Owner, Elizabeth Whelan Design

Space is limited and reservations are required. To register call (207) 775-6148 or Click here for tickets.

Media sponsor: MaineBiz

MECA Presents Made in LA

A craftsman sands a rail of a chair being made in the Thos. Moser workshop in Auburn.

A craftsman sands a rail of a chair being made in the Thos. Moser workshop in Auburn.

Made in LA is an interactive exhibition of the thriving yet often hidden creative makers in Lewiston Auburn, Maine, showcasing the ideas, processes and products driven by innovation and dependent on traditional and contemporary design solutions. The exhibition reinforces MECA’s focus on educating highly accomplished artists and designers and demonstrates the need for empowering a new generation of creative-problem solvers to work in both existing and emerging Maine companies.

Employees at Maine Thread Company in Lewiston cut and bundle the company’s signature waxed tapered handsewing threads.

Employees at Maine Thread Company in Lewiston cut and bundle the company’s signature waxed tapered handsewing threads.

Made in LA is open in the June Fitzpatrick Gallery at MECA, 522 Congress Street, Portland, Maine from July 1-31, 2016. The exhibition will highlight the diverse range of manufacturing and artisan craftsmanship taking place in LA Maine. With recognition of a deeply rooted history in manufacturing, the present and future of these industries will be highlighted by showing how Lewiston Auburn maintains a thriving and growing community of makers and products. Participants in the exhibition include: Bourgeois Guitars, EllieAnna Purse Co., Elmet Technologies, Fashionuji, Globe Footwear, Maine Thread Company, McIntosh & Company Cabinetmakers, Modula Inc, Neokraft, Rancourt & Co. Shoecrafters, Sofia Fima and Thos. Moser Cabinetmakers. The exhibition is supported by Museum LA and sponsored by Baxter Brewing, the Lewiston Auburn Economic Growth Council, and Maine College of Art.  

The opening reception on Friday, July 1, 2016, 5:00–8:00pm is free and open to the public as part of Portland’s First Friday Art Walk.  

Made in LA is curated by Nikki Rayburn. Nikki received an MFA in Craft/Material Studies from Virginia Commonwealth University in 2013 and a BFA in Woodworking and Furniture Design from Maine College of Art in 2011. Her work embraces traditional craft techniques, with training in woodworking, textiles, and basketry construction, and aims to honor the laborious and physical nature of one’s making practice. Nikki has exhibited her work extensively throughout the United States, and has work included in multiple permanent collections including the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, VA. She currently serves as Adjunct Faculty and Woodshop Technician in the Woodworking and Furniture Design Department at Maine College of Art.

To learn more about Made in LA  or Maine College of Art, please visit meca.edu/made-in-LA. The June Fitzpatrick Gallery is open to the public, free of charge, Wednesday–Sunday, 11:00am–5:00pm, Thursdays until 7:00pm, and First Fridays until 8:00pm.

Founded in 1882 and located in the heart of Downtown Portland’s thriving Arts District, MECA offers BFA (Bachelor of Fine Arts) in 11 studio majors, MFA (Master of Fine Arts in Studio Art), and MAT (Master of Arts in Teaching) degrees. Pre-College and Continuing Studies programming are available for adults and youths. The Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) at MECA and Joanne Waxman Library are free and open to the public.

Vestibule 594 presents COLLAGE CUTOUTS

A two person exhibition of original artwork by Gibrian Foltz & Anika Wilson

Opening Reception First Friday Artwalk: July 1st from 5-8pm

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I’ve always had some sort of creative outlet, and enjoy passing the time learning new mediums and experimenting. At the moment I am attempting to convert strange/surreal paper collages into multi-layered stencils, and also making stenciled portraits. Having no formal training, I tend to pull inspiration from a broad range of sources – local art, street art from around the world, art textbooks and magazines I happen across, etc. I’m intrigued by learning new processes and mediums, with the only central thread seeming to be a desire to create bizarre scenes/images/narratives bereft of context, leaving room for interpretation.

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Anika Wilson is a mixed media artist whose work explores life’s many dilemmas, anxieties, joys, mishaps, traumas, tragedies, insecurities and triumphs in a quirky and playful manner. She aims to create work that feels both odd and sometimes strangely uncomfortable while also being familiar and intriguing.

For More Information:

Vestibule 594
594 Congress Street
Portland, ME 04101

http://vestibule594.com/

Skowhegan at Seventy at the PMA This Summer

Organizing the Physical Evidence - Brian Bress

Brian Bress (United States, born 1975) Organizing the Physical Evidence, 2014 from the portfolio skowheganBOX no. 2, Archival inkjet print, 14 x 11 inches. Museum purchase with support from the Irving Bennett Ellis Fund and John and Linda Coleman, 2015.11.1b

The Portland Museum of Art and the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture—two of the most prominent art institutions in the state of Maine—collaborate on Skowhegan at Seventy, an exhibition that commemorates the 70th anniversary of the school’s founding and showcases work produced at the school or in its honor, including the PMA’s recent acquisition, portfolio titled skowheganBOX no. 2 (2015).

The summer program in central Maine has hosted, as teachers, guest speakers, or students, an astonishing cross-section of the contemporary art world, including Alex Katz, Robert Indiana, Glenn Ligon, Dana Schutz, and countless more—many of whom consider their time in Skowhegan as crucial to the development of their practice. This selection of prints, photographs, and paintings by artists who have taught at or attended Skowhegan comes from the PMA collection and the school’s archives; together, the works offer a glimpse into the nuanced history of contemporary art and its long relationship to the state of Maine.

PMA BACKGROUND

With an extensive collection and nationally renowned exhibitions, the Portland Museum of Art (PMA) is the cultural heart of Maine. The PMA boasts significant holdings of American, European, and contemporary art, as well as iconic works from Maine—highlighting the rich artistic tradition of the state and its artists. The museum brings it all to life with unparalleled programming. From special members-only events, Free School Tours, and a commitment to family activities, to PMA Films, curator talks, and exclusive tours of the Winslow Homer Studio—it’s all happening at the PMA.

The museum is located at Seven Congress Square in downtown Portland.

Summer Hours (through October 10): Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Thursday and Friday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Winter Hours (beginning October 11): Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Thursday and Friday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Admission is $15 for adults, $13 for seniors, and $10 for students with I.D. Children 14 and under are always free. Admission is free every Friday from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. No admission is required to visit the PMA Café and PMA Store.

Winslow Homer Studio tours are available by reservation. For more information, click here or call (207) 775-6148.

The Arts Business Institute (ABI) and MCA in partnership with Maine College of Art (MECA) and Waterville Creates present: BUSINESS WORKSHOPS FOR ARTISTS

BUSINESS WORKSHOPS FOR ARTISTS

Tuition
Both Workshops: $225 before June 15/$250 after June 15
One Workshop: $125 before June 15/$150 after June 15

MCA Member Discount Codes
One-day $25 Discount for MCA Members, Enter code MCAMEMBER
Two-day $50 Discount for MCA Members, Enter code MCAMEMBERS

REGISTER HERE

OCTOBER 22: Schedule at a glance
This session is held at Maine College of Art, 522 Congress Street, Portland, Maine 04101

9:00 a.m. Registration Opens
9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.Wholesale 101with Wendy Rosen
10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Introduction to Art Licensing with Carolyn Edlund
11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Lunch on Your Own
12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Booth Design with Wendy Rosen
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. Retail 101 with Nire Cook
2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. Artist Discussion Panel
3:50 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Individual Artist Consultations (Additional fee & optional)

OCTOBER 23: Schedule at a glance
This session is held at Waterville Creates, 93 Main Street, Waterville, Maine 04901

9:00 a.m. Registration Opens
9:30 a.m.- 10:30 a.m. Making Work that Sells with Wendy Rosen
10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Selling Art Online with Carolyn Edlund
11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Lunch on Your Own
12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Pricing for Profit with Wendy Rosen and Carolyn Edlund
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. Building Gallery Relationships with Carolyn Edlund
2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. Artist Discussion Panel
3:50 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Individual Artist Consultations (Additional fee & optional)

Greenhut Galleries to Show New Works

GreenHut-Issacs

Henry Issacs “Between the Islands #3”, 36”x36” inches, Oil on canvas

 

Greenhut Galleries of Portland will be featuring new work by artists Henry Issacs, William Irvine, Tina Ingraham and Kathi Smith

Also featured is the work of artist Margaret Gerding. The exhibit will run from June 2- July 2 with an opening reception Thursday, June 2 from 5-7 pm.