Archive for Rockland

Three Solo Exhibits Open at Dowling Walsh Gallery

“The Poppy and the Greenhouse,” by Cig Harvey.

Dowling Walsh Gallery will host three solo exhibitions in July featuring work by Cig Harvey, Jenny Brillhart and Marilynn Gelfman Karp.

The gallery will host an artist reception on opening day from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. July 3 and a gallery open house each Friday from 3 to 5 p.m. The shows run through Aug. 1.

Cig Harvey’s exhibition, “Eat Flowers,” is a feverish exploration into how things feel, as represented through photography. The profusion of color and nature is a visual reminder that we are alive, and embracing it celebrates the basic human desire to be surrounded by beauty. These new photographs aim to bombard our primal senses. They are riotous and gluttonous, explosive and dramatic, full of life yet somehow simultaneously suffocating and terrifying.

Harvey’s artistic practice seeks to find the magical in everyday life. It is deeply rooted in the natural environment and offers explorations of belonging and familial relationships. Her photographs and artist books have been widely exhibited and remain in the permanent collections of major museums and collections, including the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas; the Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockland, Maine; and the International Museum of Photography and Film at the George Eastman House, Rochester, New York. She lives in Rockport.

“Blue Moon,” by Jenny Brillhart.

Jenny Brillhart received a BFA from Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, and an MFA in painting from the The New York Academy of Art. She has shown her work in Berlin and Florida and in 2017 exhibited at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art in a two-person show alongside artist Sara Stites. Brillhart is included in the 2019 deCordova New England Biennial. She lives and works in Stonington.

“Birdseye Sunset at the Equator Specimen,” by Marilynn Gelfman Karp.

Marilynn Karp is a sculptor whose mixed-media, found object works are represented in collections nationally and abroad. She holds a doctorate in physics and aesthetics and has taught art and material culture at New York University for 42 years. Karp is the author of “In Flagrante Collecto: Caught in the Act of Collecting” (Abrams, 2006) as well as the forthcoming book “Uncorked: A Corkscrew Collection” (Abbeville, 2020). She has given interviews, presented papers, and appeared on panels at museums and universities on various topics within the purview of collecting. She is the president of the Anonymous Arts Recovery Society and a trustee and board member of the Preservation League of New York State. Karp divides her time between her New York City studio and a farmhouse in upstate New York.

“Immersed in the rural landscape, I found miraculously enlightening instances of the mergence of the natural and the manmade by birds and insects,” Karp says. “This has informed and adapted my eye to the bird’s eye view and the wasp’s stunning utilization of architecture and utility meters as habitats. I now play their game with their abandoned nests and turn the tables to invent what they might have done in different times and places. As an avid observer of material culture, my sculptures suggest that the impetus to acquire, organize and integrate is proof that the hunter-gatherer instinct is alive and well.”

Dowling Walsh Gallery is at 365 Main St., Rockland. Go to www.dowlingwalsh.com, or call 207-596-0084 for more information.

Archipelago Reopens and Announces New Book by Ashley Bryan

Author and illustrator Ashley Bryan. Image courtesy of Bob Thayer.

Archipelago the Island Institute Store, located at 386 Main St. in Rockland, reopened on June 24 and is adhering to the CDC guidelines for the health and safety of its customers and staff.

Current hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday.

As part of its reopening, store is also celebrating the latest release by Maine author and illustrator Ashley Bryan, an autobiography titled “Infinite Hope: A Black Artist’s Journey from World War II to Peace.”

The book is a deeply moving picture-book memoir about serving in the segregated army during World War II and how love and the pursuit of art sustained him. In May of 1942, at the age of 18, Ashley was drafted to fight in World War II, and for the next three years he faced the horrors of war as a black soldier in a segregated army. Forty years later, he tells his story.

Filled with never-before-seen artwork and handwritten letters and diary entries, this illuminating and moving memoir by the Newbery Honor-winning illustrator is both a lesson in history and a testament to hope.

While shopping at Archipelago, customers are asked to adhere to several guidelines, which are posted at the store and online. Guidelines include a maximum of eight customers in the store at one time, required face coverings, minimum six feet of distance between one another, credit cards only (no cash accepted), and guests are asked to sanitize their hands at the hands-free stand upon entering, follow the directional arrows on the floor, handle items only if purchasing them, and bag their own items if they bring their own bag. Only service animals are permitted inside, and children under 8 are discouraged from shopping at this time.

Items are also available through the online store at www.thearchipelago.net. Call 207-596-0701 for more information.

CMCA to Reopen July 1

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art in Rockland will reopen to the public on Wednesday, July 1. New hours will be 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. on Sundays.

Throughout July, a special reopening admission of $5 is offered; CMCA members and children under the age of 18 are always admitted free of charge. The CMCA gift shop is open to the public at no charge.

Private tours led by CMCA executive director Suzette McAvoy will be available by reservation from 10 to 11 a.m, daily for a donation of $25 for one or two people, plus admission. The maximum tour size is four people. To reserve a tour, email Jean Thompson at jthompson@cmcanow.org.

To ensure the health and safety of all concerned, visitors to CMCA are required to wear a mask or face covering at all times and to maintain a minimum of six feet from others. To limit physical contact, admission tickets may be purchased in advance on the CMCA website and the printed receipt presented at reception.

“Having been physically closed since mid-March, we are excited to once again invite visitors to enjoy the enriching experience of viewing art in person,” McAvoy says. “We will be strictly observing the State of Maine guidelines for reopening, and we are particularly fortunate that our spacious galleries, open floor plan and outdoor courtyard contribute to providing a welcoming and safe environment for visitors and staff.”

Current exhibitions at CMCA include “Skirting the Line: Painting between Abstraction and Representation,” featuring the work of five women painters, and “Erin Johnson: Unnamed for Decades,” a new, two-gallery installation by the second recipient of the Ellis-Beauregard Foundation Fellowship in the Arts. Also on view are videos by artist Erin Dorney from her series “Question the Body.”

CMCA is located at 21 Winter St., Rockland. For additional information, visit www.cmcanow.org.

Create Collagraph Prints at July’s ArtLab for All Ages

In observance of the Fourth of July holiday, the Center for Maine Contemporary Art’s monthly ArtLab for All Ages workshop will be held on Saturday, July 11, instead of the typical first Saturday of the month. Participants will learn to create collagraph print portraits using a variety of textured materials.

The workshop will be offered in the CMCA courtyard in two sessions from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. and 3 to 4 p.m. Twenty seats are available per session. Individual art kits will be provided and six feet social distancing observed. The workshop is free, but advance reservations are required. To preregister, email CMCA education coordinator Mia Bogyo at mbogyo@cmcanow.org.

The workshop will also be streamed live on facebook.com/cmcanow, as well, for those who prefer to participate virtually.

Learn more at https://cmcanow.org/event/artlab-for-all-ages-july.

Reggie Burrows Hodges and Marilynn Karp Exhibit at Dowling Walsh Gallery

Reggie Burrows Hodges, “In Retrospect: Behind the Curtain.”

Dowling Walsh Gallery will host exhibitions of work by Reggie Burrows Hodges (June 5 to 27) and Marilynn Karp from (June 5 to Aug. 1). Also on view is an exhibition of works by Betsy Eby through June 27.

Reggie Burrows Hodges’ work centers around visual metaphor and storytelling. He works primarily large-scale on raw canvas, wood and rag paper with acrylic and pastel and explores themes such as identity, truth, surveillance and childhood memories. As method, Hodges paints from a black ground, developing the environment around the figure so it emerges from its surroundings, examining the possibility that we are all products of our environment.

This exhibition brings together multiple series of paintings, all revolving around the theme of memory. Narrative is explored directly through his childhood recollections and representations of community through invented portraiture, bringing in personal experiences as well as imagery. These works show his multifaceted approach to painting and his interest in representations of the everyday.

Marilynn Gelfman Karp, “Magpie & Bee Riff 06.”

Marilynn Karp is a sculptor whose mixed-media, found-object works are represented in collections nationally and abroad. Karp is the author of “In Flagrante Collecto: Caught in the Act of Collecting.” She holds a doctorate in physics and aesthetics and has taught art and material culture at New York University for 42 years. Karp divides her time between her New York City studio and a farmhouse in upstate New York.

The gallery is located at 365 Main St., Rockland, and open by appointment only. To make an appointment, email info@dowlingwalsh.com or call 207-596-0084. Visit www.dowlingwalsh.com for more information.

CMCA Offers Summer Art Camps on Zoom

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art in Rockland is offering two weeks of art camps this summer on Zoom. The camps, for ages 8 to 13, will be led by teaching artist Tara Morin. Working together online, campers will turn creative ideas into original works of art at home.

Camp fees include an art kit filled with the materials and tools needed for the week’s projects. In addition, campers and their families receive free admission to CMCA’s galleries and are encouraged to take inspiration from the art on display.

“In order to keep our community safe, this summer we’re offering our popular art camp program virtually,” CMCA director Suzette McAvoy says. “We know that parents and children will be looking for activities and ways to engage while physical gatherings are still not possible. We’re hoping our camps on Zoom can help fill the need.”

Week one of CMCA’s art camp runs July 27 to 31; week two runs Aug. 3 to 7. Both weeks run 9 a.m. to noon. For more information and to register, visit www.cmcanow.org.

Sarah Faragher’s ‘At Sea’ Opens at Landing Gallery

Painting by Sarah Faragher

The solo exhibit “At Sea: new paintings of the Maine coast,” by Sarah Faragher, runs June 5 to 28 at Landing Gallery.

Faragher was born and raised on the coast of Maine and still makes her home there. She calls her paintings “memoirs of my experiences with nature.”

“The ocean is a constant companion,” she writes about her show at Landing Gallery. “In familiar seaside places, I love to sit by a quiet corner of rock and watch the waves offer their unceasing variation on timeless themes. An overwhelming ephemeral element — a cloud, the cast of light, or some tidal circumstance — will so obviously be what to paint next. It gives me a starting point around the anchors of ledges, trees, and islands. It becomes a directive to paint the changing phenomena of the world, in this singular moment.”

The gallery’s next solo exhibit, “Ordinary Time,” opens July 3 and features new paintings by Melissa Post van der Burg.

Landing Gallery is at 409 Main St. in Rockland. Go to www.Facebook.com/LandingGallery for more information, or call 207-239-1223.

Virtual Opening for ‘Unnamed for Decades’ solo exhibit by Erin Johnson

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art in Rockland will host its first-ever virtual opening reception from 5 to 6 p.m. June 6 to celebrate the exhibition “Erin Johnson | Unnamed for Decades.”

Spanning two galleries, “Erin Johnson | Unnamed for Decades” presents a series of new, site-specific installations by the artist.

Johnson is the recipient of the second annual Ellis-Beauregard Foundation Fellowship Award, which grants $25,000 to a Maine artist working in the visual arts and is paired with a solo exhibition at CMCA.

Johnson’s research-driven video installations blend documentary, experimental and narrative filmmaking devices to examine the ways in which individual lives and sociopolitical realities merge. Comprised of footage of site-specific performances, the videos explore how power structures are communicated through relationships, focusing on histories of nationalism and place.

“Unnamed for Decades” is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in Maine and presents a series of new site-specific installations that incorporate videos, sculptures and photographs. These works explore the artist’s ongoing interest in the complexity of collectivity, the wide-ranging consequences of scientific research, as well as dissidence, desire and the queer body.

The public is invited to join the event on Zoom or view live on CMCA’s Facebook page. CMCA associate curator Bethany Engstrom will offer a live video view of the exhibition, and Johnson will discuss her research and work. Donna McNeil, director of the Ellis-Beauregard Foundation and Ellen Tani, A.W. Mellon postdoctoral fellow at the National Gallery’s Center for Advanced Studies in the Visual Arts will also make remarks.

To register for the Zoom event, visit www.cmcanow.org/event/virtual-opening-erin-johnson-unnamed-for-decades.

A 360-degree virtual tour of the exhibition along with Johnson’s video works can be viewed beginning June 6 on the CMCA website at www.cmcanow.org/event/erin-johnson.

Caldbeck Gallery’s ‘Spring at Last’ Group Exhibit

“Clothesline,” oil on canvas, by Lois Dodd.

 

The group exhibition “Spring at Last” at Caldbeck Gallery features work by Alan Bray, Lois Dodd, David Dewey, Jeff Epstein, Melanie Essex, Nancy Glassman, K. Min, Kayla Mohammadi, Dennis Pinette, Dan West, Susan Williams and Nancy Wissemann-Widrig.

To view the exhibit catalog, go to https://mcusercontent.com/c6bdac10295726afaab4a2246/files/a9e5b3d8-e5e5-4280-8ab6-c19e11d84848/Spring_at_Last_2020_ecatalog.01.pdf.

Caldbeck Gallery is at 12 Elm St. in Rockland but currently closed to the public in accordance with CDC restrictions. The gallery looks forward to being open this summer season and will soon post hours. Go to www.caldbeck.com, or call 207-594-5935 for more information.

‘Unnamed for Decades’ solo exhibit by Ellis-Beauregard Foundation Fellowship Recipient Erin Johnson

Erin Johnson, “There are things in this world that have yet to be named,” single-channel video, still. Photo courtesy of the artist.

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art in Rockland will present “Erin Johnson: Unnamed for Decades,” a solo exhibition of new work by the artist this summer. Originally scheduled for March 21 through June 14, the exhibition has been rescheduled due to COVID-19.

Johnson is the recipient of the second annual Ellis-Beauregard Foundation Fellowship Award, which grants $25,000 to a Maine artist working in the visual arts and is paired with a solo exhibition at CMCA.

Johnson’s research-driven video installations blend documentary, experimental and narrative filmmaking devices to examine the ways in which individual lives and sociopolitical realities merge. Comprised of footage of site-specific performances, the videos explore how power structures are communicated through relationships, focusing on histories of nationalism and place.

“Unnamed for Decades” is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in Maine. Spanning two galleries, the exhibition presents a series of new site-specific installations that incorporate videos, sculptures and photographs. These works explore the artist’s ongoing interest in the complexity of collectivity, the wide-ranging consequences of scientific research, as well as dissidence, desire and the queer body.

The title of the exhibition is drawn from a text about Solanum plastisexum, an Australian bush tomato whose sexual expression has confounded scientists and appears to be unpredictable and unstable, challenging even the fluid norms of the plant kingdom. This enigmatic plant is central to “There are things in this world that have yet to be named,” a video filmed in Bucknell University’s Solanum plastisexum lab and Los Angeles’s Huntington Botanical Garden. The voice-over is an amalgamation of texts, including love letters between conservationist Rachel Carson and her Southport Island neighbor Dorothy Freeman, and interviews with botanist Tanisha Williams. In an adjacent series of photographs and video installations, a group of friends, peers and lovers engage in collective queer and desirous exchanges, such as eating tomatoes in a field and floating together in a lake.

Reflecting on feminist theorist Silvia Federici’s call to “reconnect what capitalism has divided: our relation with nature, with others, and our bodies,” the exhibition considers questions surrounding the interrelationship between scientific and political practices, the reinvention of what it means to be human, and the climate crisis.

CMCA is temporarily closed to the public due to COVID-19, with a planned reopening of July 1, subject to change. See cmcanow.org for more information.