Archive for shows

Waiting for Spring at Markings Gallery

Warm and Cozy…. “Waiting for Spring” at Markings Gallery in Bath, March 1 to April 1, with a Gallery reception March 17, from 12-4pm with artist’s demos of felting…. and just possibly a performance of belly dancers!

We are all familiar with Maine euphemisms for our seasons.  “Maine has two seasons: winter and preparing for winter.”  Or how about:  “Maine has two seasons: winter and August.”  March is notorious for teasing us with a few warming days and plenty of mud!

So let’s cozy up and make the wait colorful and comfortable.

The scarves of Fiona Washburn (featured in photo) are hand painted with extraordinary detail on silk, and silk velvet.  Kris Sandoy creates marvelous felted hats and scarves in a wonderful palate of colors and styles.

Janice Jones has transitional weight scarves and lovely vests to help chase dreary spring weather away.

Warm up your living space with the glorious rag rugs of Hillary Hutton.  Hector Jaegar’s hand dyed wool rugs invite one to settle in and muse on his contemporary exploration of color and design.

And for tickling the sense of the absurd the tea cozies of Susie Stephenson will make one smile away the winter blues.

60+ artists are represented in Markings Gallery. Their work inspires us to keep looking for the beauty in each day, no matter the weather outside.Warm and Cozy…. Waiting for Spring

Sohns Gallery Solo Exhibit “Oh You Pretty Things” by Kat Johnson

 

The Sohns Gallery at The Rock & Art Shop in Bangor announces a solo exhibition by local artist Kat Johnson, Oh You Pretty Things. The exhibit runs March 4 – April 28, with an opening reception Friday, March 8 at 6:30 pm. The artist will be on site to give remarks at 7:30. This event is free and open to the public.

Oh You Pretty Things will include all new works created in the past six months. The exhibition will showcase eight new large relief prints. These framed works will be for sale along with the unframed prints in the edition and other smaller prints of various subjects. The artist will be donating a portion of all sales made during the duration of the show to Mabel Wadsworth Center.

Johnson has lived and worked in Bangor for over fifteen years and this is her fourth solo show in the area and second at the Sohns Gallery. Johnson works as the Senior Museum Educator and Marketing Manager at the University of Maine Museum of Art in Downtown Bangor. She received her Masters of Fine Art in Intermedia in 2012 from the University of Maine and has been an active member of the creative community since her arrival in Maine in 2003.

This is the second exhibition of Johnson’s work at the Sohns Gallery. The first showing was a large scale evolving painting which was the inaugural show in the gallery. Having focused on painting for many years, Johnson has now turned to printmaking to create her images. Regarding this shift Johnson stated, “I’ve always painted large, flat areas of color with bold line work, very much in the style of a screen print or relief print. I thought it was time I finally made that leap to fully delve into the process of printmaking.”

Connie Hayes, ‘Face Time’ at Dowling Walsh Gallery

 

Please join us for the culmination of our community fundraising project on Saturday, March 2nd from 3-5pm.  Additional donations will be accepted during the event.

March Exhibitions at Greenhut Galleries

Tim Christensen, Tunk Stream Blackwoods Porcelain 14 x 6 x 6 inches

These exhibitions are shown from March 7 – 30 with an opening reception on March 7 from 5-7.  Tim Christensen will give a talk on March 9 at 1 and Henry Isaacs on March 16 at 1.
Greenhut is pleased to announce its first exhibition of work by printmaker, PMA Biennial featured porcelain artist, environmentalist, and writer, Tim Christensen. The exhibition is titled, “In Response to Chaos” and the work featured in this show is the culmination of his latest sea voyage.
When I googled “Container Ship Passage Australia” 2-1/2 years ago, it was with the intention that I would create a body of work that would chronicle an odyssey. I had been asked to present my pecha kucha talk, “Art in the Holocene Extinction” in Cooroy, Queensland, and from this invitation, I created a “mega-transect,” a study of the Earth’s systems that would come to span the major oceans, 6 of the 7 continents, and take me around the world using about 5 gallons of crude oil. I would experience the heat of the Sudanese Red Sea, the wet of the Bornean Jungle, the loneliness of the Pacific, the space of the Australian bush, and the chaos of living in places where everything is unfamiliar and new. I would experience hurricanes, typhoons, pirates, state security services, dingos, snakes, insects, flying fish, whales, sharks, sea snakes, macaques, leeches, superstition, inescapable reality, and plastic. I would see rare birds, rare sea creatures, rare atmospheric events, rare primates, and catch rare glimpses into lives- foreign and internal. In setting out to experience the world’s most remote places, I committed to recording my experiences in as many durable, tangible, and recognizable ways I could think of.
I had two rules for this project: “Make everything possible as new as possible,” and “Always say, ’Yes.’” The resulting work reflects my observations of subjects internal and external. I looked at everything as equally valid and important, from traditional math- based-scientific data to more abstractly emotional and philosophical ideas.
I have used infinitely durable porcelain and universal visual language (Art!), to communicate what I saw across time, language, culture, and geographic barriers. These artifacts are designed to last tens of thousands of years and be accessible to anyone or anything with an eyeball and the ability to think abstractly. I conveyed the intimate daily experiences of the first voyage in that most personal of ways: by writing a book. Reflect, Adapt, and Persevere, co-written by Carri Lange and bound by Anna Low, was made using archival paper and inks, a self-created font of my handwriting, original drawings and intaglio prints, and a combination of ancient and modern silk screen printing processes and materials. During my travels, I used durable and portable etching plates and ancient drypoint to record my environment, often en plein air, capturing each day’s most compelling event, and later learned intaglio printing to create multiple images of what I saw. In all cases, I have “shown my work”, allowing the growth in the way I express myself to be evident alongside that which I was expressing.
Tim Christensen lives in Maine, splitting his time between Franklin and Roque Bluffs.

Henry Isaacs, Budapest Street 7 x 5 inches, Oil on panel

 

In the side gallery this month, Greenhut presents another travel-themed exhibition: Travel Notes, small paintings by Henry Isaacs. Writer and art critic, Dan Kany, has authored a booklet to accompany the show. An excerpt from Henry’s introduction to the Travel Notes booklet:
Sicily, Spring 2014. I am sitting in a cafe in front of Il Duomo di Cefalù on a Sunday morning. It is a quiet, sunny place. The vast space is empty. My palettes and brushes are set. My first sketch is exciting, and so I set to work. It was a Sunday, and after mass the children were the first out, and some ran over to me, curious to see what I was doing. Soon enough, there was a bunch of people around me. The waiter was happy because there was much more business. I worked very slowly because I was really comfortable, and I had plenty of time since Donna was off shopping. I heard one man say to the kids, ‘He seems nice. Go. Ask him about the colors. Why is he using those colors?’ ‘Lui sembra simpati-co. Vai.’ They did. I teased the children: ‘Do you have a problem with my colors?’ ‘No, sir! Grandfather. Where do you get those colors?’ ‘These are the best colors in the world,’ I replied in my broken Italian, ’Where do you think I get them?’ After a bit of back and forth about the best colors in the world, I said — finally — ‘Sicilia!’ They all cheered and the drinks came out, including an herb liqueur that was foul and tasted like 250% alcohol. They cheered again when I raised my glass and said, ‘Here’s to the colors of Sicilia!’ and we all toasted.
This story has repeated itself around the world so often that I am surprised when some version of it doesn’t happen. Painting on the tea terraces of Rwanda, women stop and watch from a respectful distance, and though I speak no Kinyarwanda, there is a smile, an exchange, a question, a brush tried out. Mayan children gather in highland villages in Guatemala and teach me the names of colors in K’iche’. In a small yurt in the mountains of central Japan, I work alongside my ninety-year-old Japanese friend while he paints his long scrolls. Near Black Mountain, Maine, I sit for the day painting small panels in August. Friends, family, and strangers join me for minutes or hours painting for the first or the umpteenth time as we chat away on the most splendid of days.
So many of my paintings have such records of companionship and stories embedded in them. I don’t necessarily remember all the details when I bring them back to my studio, but I remember enough. Art for me has never been a private undertaking. I mean it to be shared. My story of Sicily could just as easily have taken place on the Eastern Prom in Portland, Maine….
I hope the work and I always remain sembra simpatico.
Henry Isaacs received his BFA in Painting from the Rhode Island School of Design and his MFA in Printmaking from the Slade School of Fine Art in England. He has taught and lectured around the world and his work is in numerous public and private collections. When not traveling the world, Henry splits his time between Portland and Vermont.

Tidemark Gallery Show: The Word Made Art

Tidemark Gallery + Café is pleased to present “The Word Made Art,” a group art exhibition to mark this year’s celebration of Herman Melville’s 200th birthday with works inspired by the the American Renaissance (1820-1860). Participating visual artists offer, in their chosen media, responses to literary works of men and women from the seminal era of American Romanticism: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Edger Allen Poe, Emily Dickinson, and others.

The artists featured in the show will include: Chris Augusta, Barbara Vanderbilt, David Peloquin, Sandy Griffin, Linda Gallion, Stephanie Muri, Susanna Lasker, Pat Parks, Lucy Martin, Stephanie Chamberlin, Alana VanDerwerker, Martha Truscott, and Helen Richmond Webb.

“The Word Made Art” will run through the first week in May, 2019. The artists will be present at the opening reception Sunday, March 2nd from 2 – 5 p.m. Gallery hours are 10-5, Wednesday through Friday, and 10-2 Saturdays. For additional information please find us on Facebook or at 902 Main Street, Waldoboro, 207 832-5109.

The Framemakers host Cozy Retreat Exhibition and Curates Gallery at The Last Unicorn

David Clinard

 

The Framemakers in Watervill host Cozy Retreat Exhibition from January 15 through March 13.

Artist collections on display include:
Mixed Media by Todd Devin Burns;
Photography by David Clinard;
Acrylics by Barbara Chase;
Jewelry by Kami Thorpe;
Prints & Earrings by Greta Joseph.
Also featuring the first public showing of “Mirsad and Cousin” by Larry Stanton.

 

Barbara Chase

Craft items such as Pottery and Art Cards are available
for purchase throughout the exhibit.

Also,

 

Ryan Kohler

 

We are excited to announce that we are partnering with The Last Unicorn Restaurant in the curation of their gallery. This exhibit includes the works of Ryan Kohler. His artwork will be displayed in both dining areas until March 13th.

UMaine Museum of Art announces Winter Exhibitions

 The University of Maine Museum of Art, located at 40 Harlow Street in downtown Bangor, opens three new exhibitions in January. UMMA is open Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am – 5 pm and brings modern and contemporary art to the region, presenting approximately 12 original exhibitions each year. UMMA’s winter shows open to the public on January 18 and runs through May 4, 2019. Admission to the Museum of Art is free in 2019 thanks to the generosity of Deighan Wealth Advisors.

REVERSIBLE ROLES: MEGHAN BRADY

Meghan Brady, Blue + Gold Gardenhead 2018, oil on canvas

Meghan Brady’s large-scale paintings and collages are brought to life through intense color saturation and dynamic, abstract forms. The compositions are vibrantly structured with unadulterated blues, intense yellows, and oranges. The focal point of the exhibition is a work titled Everyday that spans over 16 feet and explores shape and form on a grand scale. The artist states, “The container form—human or otherwise—is a jumping off point to do what I want to do, which is to construct, deconstruct, and hopefully land somewhere totally unexpected.” Brady also layers bold colors, such as acidic green over deep blue, as a means of creating unique shapes in her compelling compositions. The use of saturated color and powerful gestural marks articulate Brady’s exploration of energetic geometric forms and how they relate to each other.

The selected works of Reversible Roles involve both the concept of representation and abstraction and explore how the negative spaces—the spaces created between and around color—can become the focal point of the piece. Brady explains, “Negative shapes are the by-product of cutting shapes from canvas and these shapes transform from negative to positive in the course of one quick decision.” These works are the culmination of Brady’s practice of working with diverse media, including ceramics, woodcut, collage, and oil paint as a means of expanding her creative praxis and extending her process. Brady adds, “Reversible Roles is about the possibility of upending expectations by swapping places. Or in the case of painting, turning them upside down, placing them on the floor, or cutting them in half.” Producing works of this size is a challenging endeavor. The physicality of this process is like a dance between artist and canvas and this corporeality infuses the paintings with energy, spirit, and life.

BIG ROCK CANDY MOUNTAIN: ZACH HORN

Zach Horn, Tomatoes 2018, graphite on arches

 

Boston-based artist Zach Horn has created an exhibition where food and landscape take center stage. Horn has depicted key ingredients of a picnic: a watermelon, sliced cucumbers, a hot dog, bowls of spaghetti and even a life-sized gingham blanket. A massive graphite drawing of a cave functions like a backdrop that allows the viewer to almost step into the scene. In another area, the viewer confronts a three-dimensional sculpture of a yellow-hued mountain range that curiously projects from the wall.

Pattern and repetition are prominently featured throughout these selected works. In the large graphite drawing Tomatoes, 2018, the artist has meticulously rendered slices of tomatoes placed in perfect rows. Horn states, “The food pictures are arranged in symmetrical abstraction, often with a closed composition. It’s recognizable form, but it is couched in the language of spiritual abstraction: patterns, mandalas, the grid, and the sublime landscape”. The artist’s celebration of routine daily tasks and the importance of coming together around food have inspired these compositions. The repetitive act of carefully preparing ingredients for the family meal may be a ruminative experience, just as drawing may be a meditative act. Ultimately, Horn invites the viewer to contemplate feelings evoked through food and the environment.

EDGING FORWARD: RICHARD KEEN

Richard Keen, Form Singularity No. 107 2017, acrylic and oil on canvas

 

Maine-based artist Richard Keen explores abstraction in both paintings and mixed media, wall-oriented sculptures. Keen states that “experiences are brought into focus by removing unnecessary detail, often simplifying the world into line, shape, color and texture.” In his paintings there are often predominant solid shapes, sometimes further accentuated by precisely painted pin-striped lines, that occupy other expanses of color. Imbued with order and clarity, the angular forms in Keen’s paintings seem to be derived from aerial views of the landscape. Dominant central shapes often have smaller lines that are like pathways or roads, leading the eye off the picture plane.Shapes that emerge in Keen’s paintings inform his wall sculptures—often incorporating surfaces created by sanding though successive layers of paint. Originally inspired by the undersides of boats being stripped of paint, Keen’s revelation of these layers of history is integral to his process. The quirky, enigmatic forms created by the artist integrate objects such discarded wood and other found materials.  Using polyester resin, fillers and spray enamel, Keen brings together these contrasting surfaces within his singular compositions.

Jerri Finch Works Showcased at Thos. Moser in Freeport

Belfast artist Jerri Finch is pleased to be part of the Thos. Moser Winter-Spring Show, “Maine’s Four Seasons for Art” at Thos. Moser Cabinetmakers in Freeport.

Featuring work by David Little and introducing artists Kristine Biegel, Richard William Blanchard, Mark Coates, Jerri Finch, Lisa Kyle, David D. Pearce, Lea’ Peterson, Donald Rainville and Andrea Rouda.

Ongoing exhibitors include Linda Bail, Philip Barter, Andre’ Benoit, Tom Curry, David Estey, Philip Frey, Anne Ireland, James Kucheman, Ann Mohnkern, Don Ripper, Marguerite Robichaux and Judy Taylor.

The show concludes April 29, 2019.

Dowling Walsh Gallery Hosts a Performative Drawing Project by Connie Hayes

 

Connie Hayes, Nick Ruffin, 2019, Graphite on paper, 13″ x 9 1/2″

For the months of January and February, Connie Hayes will draw one hundred portraits at Dowling Walsh Gallery of people from a cross section of the community. This performative drawing project will create a visual dialogue and representation of our area through the artist’s work. Each drawing is available for $100, with one hundred percent of the proceeds gifted to an organization chosen by the subject of the drawing.

For more information, visit us online at www.dowlingwalsh.com  or call 207-596-0084

Cynthia Winings Gallery’s MID-WINTER Valentine’s Day Show


The Cynthia Winings Gallery in Blue Hill presents: The Mid-Winter Valentine’s Day Show: A group exhibition featuring the artworks of Louise Bourne, Jenny Brillhart, Molly Blake, Avy Claire, Devta Doolan, Sarah Doremus, Heather Lyon, Buzz Masters, Bill Mayher, Cynthia Winings and Goody-B. Wiseman!

 

Buzz Masters

 

 

Evening Reception: Friday, February 8, 5:00 – 8PM. 

Please Join me for this One Day Event where the Art will Warm Your Heart And Soul – There will be Refreshments and Good Company, too.
PLEASE DRESS WARMLY. Everyone is Welcome!