Archive for exhibitions

News & Opportunities from the Maine Crafts Association

MCA Program Calendar: Upcoming Events and Deadlines

2019

Jan 15: Sign Up Deadline for Maine Gallery Guide Co-Op Ad

Jan 19: M2M Workshop: Speed Designing with Jolene McGowan

Jan 31: Portland Fine Craft Show Application Deadline

February: Registration opens for Maine Craft Weekend

Feb15: Sign Up Deadline for Mother’s Day Ad in Downeast Magazine

April 5: Sign Up Deadline for June Maine Magazine Co-Op Ad

May 3: Sign Up Deadline for July Downeast Magazine Co-Op Ad

May 9-12: Annual MCA Workshop Weekend @ Haystack

June 9: Public Opening Reception MCA Master Craft Artist Ten-Year Anniversary Exhibition @ Fuller Craft Museum

June 1: 2019 Seconds & Supplies SALE @ Running with Scissors

June 28: Sign Up Deadline for Portland Monthly Art Annual Co-Op Ad

Sept 6: Sign Up Deadline for November Downeast Magazine Co-Op Ad

Oct 5-6: Maine Craft Weekend 2019

 

APPLY by January 31, 2019

Call for exhibitors for the 5th Annual Portland Fine Craft Show, August 24 from 9am-5pm on Congress Street in Portland, ME. Apply as a fine craft artist working in baskets, ceramics, fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, stone or wood. The Portland Fine Craft Show remains one of the only Maine craft shows open to artists not living in Maine, and has a reputation for being well-organized and high quality, with high attendance.

PORTLAND FINE CRAFT SHOW 2019 JURORS

Elena Kubler | Owner/Curator, The Turtle Gallery
Kazeem Lawal | Owner/Curator, Portland Trading Co.
Anja Levitties | Chair, 2019 Philadelphia Museum of Art Contemporary Craft Show

 

January 19, 2019: Speed Designing with Jolene McGowan

Are you looking to grow your 2019 audience and further your visual web presence? Join us in Ellsworth at Artsworth for a new professional development workshop! Participants will leave this workshop with their own Mailchimp account and a completed promotional flier designed and created in Adobe Spark featuring their work or business. All of this will be accomplished in one workshop, setting the participant up for future promotions.

 

Catch the Fall Exhibitions at the Colby Museum

Torkwase Dyson, Nautical Dusk installation, 2018

 

The Colby College Museum of Art creates academically robust and engaging exhibitions. This fall, the Colby Museum is pleased to present the following exhibitions: Torkwase Dyson: Nautical Dusk (through January 6, 2019), Darkness Visible: Goya Prints from the Lunder Collection (through January 20, 2019), Nancy Spero: Unbound (through January 20, 2019), and Currents 8: Carly Glovinski (through February 17, 2019).

Torkwase Dyson: Nautical Dusk
At the invitation of the Museum, the New Jersey-based artist Torkwase Dyson visited Waterville to consult archival materials related to Samuel Osborne (c. 1833–1904). Born into slavery on a Virginia plantation, Osborne migrated to Maine in 1865 and served as a Colby College janitor from 1867 to 1903. In the works she produced for Nautical Dusk, Dyson combines simple geometric forms infused with metaphorical associations found in obituaries of Osborne written by unnamed white authors. These texts raise questions about authorship, transmission, and self-determination, all issues that she will continue to unpack over the run of the show. Nautical Dusk features sculptures and paintings that explore these subjects in a formal register through intimacy, liquidity, and reflectiveness. What results are expanded dimensions of space. Occupying half the gallery is a work entitled Dusk, a monolithic ramp that functions as an architectural intervention, activating the space and inviting engagement or contemplation. It suggests a promontory, an outcropping from which to scan or surveil, but also a structure partially submerged.

Torkwase Dyson (b. 1973) was born in Chicago, Illinois, and spent her developmental years between North Carolina and Mississippi before earning her BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University and her MFA from the Yale School of Art. She was recently included in the 2018 group exhibition Between the Waters at the Whitney Museum of American Art and will be included in the 2019 Sharjah Biennial.

 

Carly Glovinski, Canyon Picnic, 2018. Acrylic on laser-cut plexiglass; acrylic on paper, photographs, plexiglass, wood.

 

Currents 8: Carly Glovinski
Established by the Colby Museum in 2004, the Currents exhibition series is dedicated to emerging artists with connections to Maine. For the eighth installment of the series, Carly Glovinski has created a group of works for a two-part exhibition on the theme of landscape that is on view currently at the Colby Museum and the Waterville Public Library. At the Colby Museum the commissioned works include painted sculptures and works on paper inspired by works in the Lunder Collection, several of which are on view in an adjacent gallery arranged by the artist. For the portion of the exhibition mounted at the Waterville Public Library, Glovinski has produced a group of three-dimensional paintings that closely resemble books in the library’s collection. These painted objects are exhibited on the library’s shelves. Designed to be explored by the hand and eye, they can be discovered by library patrons via a finding aid.

The Currents 8 catalogue will be available in late 2018 and will feature essays by Lunder Curator of American Art Elizabeth Finch and the writer Heidi Julavits.

Carly Glovinski (b. 1981) holds a BFA from Boston University and has shown her work nationally. She grew up in Berwick, Maine, and has a studio in nearby Rollinsford, New Hampshire.

 

Francisco de Goya, El sueño de la razón produce monstruos from Los Caprichos, 1799. Bound set of 80 intaglios on cream laid paper, 12 1/4 x 8 1/8 x 7/8 in.

 

Darkness Visible: Goya Prints from the Lunder Collection
During his lifetime the Spanish artist Francisco de Goya (1746–1828) was known for his commissioned works, but his independently produced prints are arguably his greatest achievement. This focused exhibition from the Lunder Collection includes a bound copy of Goya’s Los Caprichos (1799), accompanied by a digital resource that allows visitors to see an image of each print in the order Goya established for the series. The exhibition also includes a 19th-century commentary, or “key” to the series, by an unknown writer.

Darkness Visible: Goya Prints from the Lunder Collection is organized to coincide with an exhibition of the work of Nancy Spero (1926–2009), one of many artists who have been inspired by Goya’s visionary creations as a graphic artist.

 

Nancy Spero, Liberty – Athlete, 1995. Handprinting and printed collage on paper, 24 1⁄2 x 38 1⁄2 in.

 

Nancy Spero: Unbound
For more than five decades, Nancy Spero (1926–2009) pioneered a feminist art practice that fiercely defied the social expectations imposed on women. Using a lexicon of appropriated imagery, Spero envisioned, as she observed in 1987, “all manner of processions, conflicts, interruptions and disruptions.” Her hybrid artworks made in protest against war and in celebration of the liberated female body constitute Nancy Spero: Unbound, an exhibition organized in conjunction with a concurrent presentation of Francisco Goya’s prints, which Spero first encountered as an aspiring young artist.

Spanning the artist’s entire career, Nancy Spero: Unbound includes one of her earliest surviving works: a lithograph dating from around 1950, depicting an ecstatic dancer whose outstretched limbs resist containment. In 1966, when Spero initiated a truculent series of drawings to protest the Vietnam War, she began to work primarily on and with paper, a material she preferred for its versatility and economy. She subsequently introduced the use of collaged images made from cutouts of her prints. She also joined paper sheets end to end to create vertical and horizontal scrolls, often composing on a monumental scale.

The expressions of ecstasy and protest that defined Spero’s early practice gave way to representations of the female subject as an “activator” in works derived from found and altered images, sometimes with accompanying quotations. Late in life Spero explored her visual lexicon in new and even more expansive sites, drawing and printing directly on the wall and revisiting her Vietnam War–era imagery to create one of her last major works, Maypole: Take No Prisoners II (2008), a towering, multi-part sculpture that serves as the exhibition’s arresting centerpiece.

Betts Gallery celebrates annual ‘Holiday Galleria’

 

This December, Betts Gallery celebrates the holidays with their annual ‘Holiday Galleria’ show, joining in on the Belfast Holiday Artwalk with an opening reception, Friday December 7th, 5:30-8pm. The exhibit of local, affordable art, in a variety of media includes works by: Sally Brophy, Jennie Connor, Susan Cooney, Julie Cyr, Kris Engman, Sarah Faragher, Helene Ferrar, Conny Hatch, David Jacobson, Sheep Jones, Mark Kelly, Allegra Kuhn, Kathleen Mack, Leslie Moore, Willy Reddick, Wes Reddick, Betty Schopmeyer, Lesia Sochor, Kay Sullivan, Mary Trotochaud and Peter Walls. Be sure to check in often, as the show, which runs from December 7th through the 22nd, will be changing throughout the month as sold pieces are replaced by new work.

8x10x100 and Holiday Members Show at The Harlow

The Harlow is home of the Kennebec Valley Art Association, a non-profit celebrating its 60th anniversary on December 1, 2018. The public is invited to celebrate the occasion and attend the opening reception for both 8x10x100 and our annual Holiday Members Show & Sale on Saturday, December 1st from 5-7pm.  Both are on view from December 1-29.
  • During8x10x100, all artworks measure 8×10 inches and are available for sale for the affordable price of $100 each. 50% of sales benefit programming at The Harlow while the other 50% goes directly to the artist.
  • The Harlow’s annual Holiday Members Show & Sale celebrates the diverse artwork styles of Harlow artist members and is a tradition dating back to the founding of the Gallery in 1963.
  • During both the 8x10x100 and the Members Show, work by Maine artists representing a wide range of media can be purchased off the wall and taken home the same day. The public is invited to visit The Harlow and support local artists by choosing unique and handcrafted gifts this holiday season.

Exhibitions are always free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Wednesday-Saturday, 12-6pm.

Art for The Holidays at Gleason Fine Art’s

Ed Parker, Happy Holidays, acrylic, 4” double sided ornament

Wouldn’t it be fun to see what career artists could come up with for tree ornaments? That’s the idea behind the centerpiece of Gleason Fine Art’s “Art for the Holidays” show, which begins Thursday, November 29, 2018, and runs through Wednesday, January 2, 2019. A beautiful Christmas tree will be decorated with ornaments made by the gallery’s artists. A celebratory open house, to which everyone is invited, will be held at Gleason Fine Art, 31 Townsend Avenue, from 3 to 6 pm, on Saturday, December 1, to coincide
with Harbor Lights Festival. Refreshments including wine and craft beer will be
served.

Janice Anthony, Canada Lilies, acrylic, 4” double sided ornament

 

Jeff Barrett, Happy Fish, oil painted wood, 4” long fish ornaments

For his ornaments, Southport summer resident Ed Parker has carved and painted two pieces with his characteristic folky nautical themes. Ed’s delightful “Lighthouse Dog” is decked out in his holiday finest. Lani Havens has made a series of gorgeous blocks collaged with delicate red, orange, and pink poppies. Maine realist Janice Anthony has created a tiny double-sided painting of yellow and orange lilies. Folk artist Jeff Barrett’s whimsical carvings have been purchased by collectors ranging from those with surnames like Rockefeller and Marcus (as in Neiman-Marcus) to tourists just back from visiting the Botanical Gardens. For the gallery’s tree, Jeff has netted us an entire school of his “happy fish.” Besides the tree ornaments that are arriving daily, the gallery’s showrooms have been hung with a bounty of seasonal paintings by gallery favorites Mitch and Kathleen Billis, Kevin Beers, and Tom Curry. East Boothbay artist Andrea Peters’ sumptuous snowscapes are a feast of color. East Boothbay summer resident, and newly minted Gleason artist, Don Demers, has given the gallery several new oils, including a little beauty titled “Winter Tide.” Roger Dale Brown, who joined the Gleason roster just this year, is represented by several glowing, snow-covered paintings of Maine coastal villages and harbors. Not interested in paintings? The gallery has so much more: a new batch of George Pearlman’s porcelain jars, vases, and pots in cobalt and emerald green; rings, necklaces, and bracelets by Christine Peters, our former gallery manager who has become a jewelry rock star; and a luscious selection of Moroccan rugs from that indomitable duo, Diana Kerr and Kathleen Jones.

Curator’s Selection at George Marshall Store Gallery

Necklace by Lauren Pollaro, Ceramic by David Ernster

By tradition the final exhibition for the year at Old York’s George Marshall Store Gallery is called Curator’s Selection. The show includes work by 20 regional artists, many exhibiting for the first time at the gallery.
Jewelry by Lauren Pollaro and ceramics by David Ernster are also featured. Pollaro is well known for her one-of-a-kind pieces that have a harmonious interplay of dynamic color, texture, materials and technique. Ernster’s ceramics finished with red and yellow glazes pair perfectly with Pollaro’s display. The exhibits continue through December 16. Hours are 10-4 Thursday – Saturday, 1-4 on Sunday. 140 Lindsay Road, York.

Maine Farmland Trust Gallery opens HOMELAND

 

Colette Shumate Smith: “#American Gothic”, mixed media on wood panel, 35 x 35 in. 

HOMELAND: A multimedia exhibit exploring
our collective and diverse relationship to home/land

 

Maine Farmland Trust Gallery’s new exhibit HOMELAND speaks to a deep relationship that comes from cultivating the land, and a longing for connection with the land. This open call exhibit was promoted and curated in collaboration with GEDAKINA, Inc., a multigenerational endeavor to strengthen and revitalize the cultural knowledge and identity of Native American youth and families from across New England, and to conserve traditional homelands and places of historical, ecological and spiritual significance.

The first floor of the gallery features sixteen artists from varied backgrounds that seek to explore their relationship to home and land in a wide variety of mediums and styles.

Arlene Claudill Hulva’s colored pencil figurative landscape integrates New England and Latin American panoramas.

 A vibrant Medicine Wheel painting by Mihku Paul-Anderson incorporates elements from the Waponaki culture and symbols from the natural world, while Maureen Block uses a 20th century ironing board as her painting surface for her work “Uprooted, Unrooted, Rerooted,” that depicts writhing roots in bold reds and yellows.

In two very different interpretations of Grant Woods’s iconic painting “American Gothic”, Colette Shumate Smith’s mixed media self-portrait reminds us to be vigilant of changing attitudes toward the land; and Bill Robitzek’s acrylic painting “Bowdoinham Gothic: Sarah and Laura” depicts a modern farm couple that is self-sufficient, and socially-conscious.

Liz McGhee: “Vibrations”, mixed media and gelatin print, 12 x 18 in.

Liz McGhee’s gelatin plate monotypes use a palette of blues, grays, purples, and browns with shapes and line that depict her intuitive wanderings through minimalistic landscapes.

Patricia Ranzoni, Bucksport’s 2014 Poet Laureate, contributes three lyrical, flowing poems on the greater longing for ancient home ground and the yearning of displaced peoples for their place on Earth.

Gabrielle Brown: “Storage Basket 2”, copper, graphite, canvas, 8 x 7 x 7 in.

Gabrielle Brown’s five copper, graphite and canvas woven baskets are based on Shaker designs. Elizabeth Hunter has created a grouping of rya pillows, an ancient Nordic woven pile technique, which speak to human’s connection with the seasons.

 

Kathy Pollard: “Corn Mother”, glass beads, corn husks, moose antler

Kathy Pollard will be displaying a large piece of birch bark with inscribed and painted Maine Indian petroglyph reproductions, and a beautiful sculpture “Corn Mother,” made with glass beads and moose antler.

Constant Albertson: “Désolé”, ceramics, 16 x 9 in.

A mixed media installation by Thér̀ese Provenzano incorporates objects to invoke memories of childhood and change, while Constant Albertson will have two ceramic sculpture pieces on display with themes of water awareness.

Color photographs by Christina Gessler, Emily Davis, and Karyn Marden depict varied subjects, such as quintessential views of life on a farm, organically found picture rocks, and images of the Casco Bay area.

 

Karen Merritt: “Perfect Offering”, gelatin silver print, 9 x 9 in.

Karen Merritt’s gelatin silver prints portray the beauty in urban gardens of Portland in black and white.

Maine Farmland Trust will host the exhibit at its Gallery in Belfast from November 12, 2018 through March 1, 2019. Artist talks will be held on Friday, November 16th at 5pm, with a reception following from 5:30-8pm. Also, the Belfast Holiday Art Walk will occur Friday, December 7th, 5:30-8pm.

MFT Gallery, located at 97 Main Street, Belfast, is open Monday through Friday from 9am-4pm. More information can be found atwww.mainefarmlandtrust.org/public-outreach-new/gallery/ .

Maine Farmland Trust is a statewide, member-powered nonprofit working to protect farmland, support farmers, and advance farming. Maine Farmland Trust created its gallery to celebrate agriculture through art, and to inspire and inform the public about farming in Maine. For more information on the Trust visit www.mainefarmlandtrust.org

 

Art Space Gallery Showcases Autumn Themed Works

Painting by Jean Byrd

Art Space Gallery welcomes the public to our November Opening showcasing artworks with an Autumn theme November 2nd, from 5pm to 8pm. Many of our artists will be on hand to discuss their work. In addition, we’ll have the customary refreshments.

Come see what we’ve created to celebrate the changing seasons.

Art Space Gallery is located at 405 Main Street in Rockland. The gallery features seventeen artists who work in various media and genres. November gallery hours are Friday and Saturdays from 11AM to 4 PM. We are also open by appointment. Visit our website for more information at www.artspacemaine.com.

Local and National Works Exhibition at Aquilartadvisory

Local and National Works Exhibition celebrating diverse, sometimes merging “cultures” …and spores? Many of the pieces are in petri dishes by: mark BLOOMER, astrid BOWLBY, earyrecords, Seth Fainkujen, Judith Randall, ROBERT MUNZNER DESIGNS, Erika Melhus, CAROLE, Mae Billington, MATTY, aquilARTstaff, SNOOK and ZNcollective
Opens NOV 4th runs thru DEC 2018 by chance or appointment at 400 Main Street in Norway, ME: (929) 500-2220
Closed NOV. 2nd, 3rd & 9th
Optical works, gifts and art classes in tiny bags:  AQUILARTadvisory.com/MUSEUMstore

Gleason Fine Art Presents ‘People at Play: Paintings from the Estates of Dorothy Eisner (1906-1984) and Patrick McArdle (1915-1997)

Dorothy Eisner (1906-1984), Camp Basketball, oil, 24″ x 35”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Although they never met, modernist painters Dorothy Eisner (1906-1984) and Patrick McArdle (1915-1997) have much in common. They both studied at the Art Students League, one of the country’s most influential arts institutions. And they both came of age during the first half of the 20th century, a time of change and experimentation in the art world. The impact on Eisner and McArdle of the great European modernists Matisse and Cezanne and American modernists Milton Avery and John Marin cannot be understated.  

Dorothy Eisner spent her early years in New York City, where she became an active participant in New York’s arts community. Unlike many female artists of her time, she had considerable success showing her paintings at some of that city’s great galleries, including Alfred Stiglitz’s Opportunity Gallery. Accompanied by her husband John McDonald, Eisner also enjoyed traveling abroad, especially to Mexico.

Over the years, Eisner tried several different paintings styles, but it wasn’t until she discovered Cranberry Island, a small island off the much larger Mount Desert Island in Maine, that she came fully into her own. Cranberry Island’s vibrant and friendly artist community gave Eisner the confidence she needed. Her paintings became more colorful—and playful. She painted her friends, family, and neighbors, swimming, diving, boating, and playing croquet. Her “Camp Basketball” paintings are delightful and engaging images of young girls in sailor suits playing basketball. And her “Exercise” paintings, depicting her Cranberry island neighbors struggling with some rather awkward looking stretches, can bring on a smile if not an outright laugh.

Patrick McArdle (1915-1997), Skaters in Red, Blue, and Lavender, oil, 9″ x 12”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patrick McArdle was born in England and spent his early years in Ireland. After emigrating to the United States, he focused on New York City, first for his education and then, as with Eisner, finding success at several prestigious galleries. McArdle paintings were featured in shows at both the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Museum of Modern Art.

After discovering Harpswell, Maine became Patrick McArdle’s touchstone. He had always enjoyed painting people at play, but as with Eisner, his paintings lightened and brightened after he made Maine his home. McArdle was a great observer of people, particularly people at the beach and people skating. McArdle’s gaily attired beach goers slather on sun-tan lotion and play beach volleyball with abandon, while his skaters twirl and spin on their skates, and his basketball players jump for joy.  

Although their paths never crossed, Dorothy Eisner and Patrick McArdle both expressed humor and a zest for life through their paintings. We can imagine both smiling gently as they watched people at play, people at their most uninhibited.

People at Play: Paintings from the Estates of Dorothy Eisner and Patrick McArdle runs through November 27 at Gleason Fine Art. For more information, call the gallery at 207-633-6849 or email the gallery at info@gleasonfineart.com.