Archive for exhibitions

Waiting for Spring at Markings Gallery

Warm and Cozy…. “Waiting for Spring” at Markings Gallery in Bath, March 1 to April 1, with a Gallery reception March 17, from 12-4pm with artist’s demos of felting…. and just possibly a performance of belly dancers!

We are all familiar with Maine euphemisms for our seasons.  “Maine has two seasons: winter and preparing for winter.”  Or how about:  “Maine has two seasons: winter and August.”  March is notorious for teasing us with a few warming days and plenty of mud!

So let’s cozy up and make the wait colorful and comfortable.

The scarves of Fiona Washburn (featured in photo) are hand painted with extraordinary detail on silk, and silk velvet.  Kris Sandoy creates marvelous felted hats and scarves in a wonderful palate of colors and styles.

Janice Jones has transitional weight scarves and lovely vests to help chase dreary spring weather away.

Warm up your living space with the glorious rag rugs of Hillary Hutton.  Hector Jaegar’s hand dyed wool rugs invite one to settle in and muse on his contemporary exploration of color and design.

And for tickling the sense of the absurd the tea cozies of Susie Stephenson will make one smile away the winter blues.

60+ artists are represented in Markings Gallery. Their work inspires us to keep looking for the beauty in each day, no matter the weather outside.Warm and Cozy…. Waiting for Spring

Sohns Gallery Solo Exhibit “Oh You Pretty Things” by Kat Johnson

 

The Sohns Gallery at The Rock & Art Shop in Bangor announces a solo exhibition by local artist Kat Johnson, Oh You Pretty Things. The exhibit runs March 4 – April 28, with an opening reception Friday, March 8 at 6:30 pm. The artist will be on site to give remarks at 7:30. This event is free and open to the public.

Oh You Pretty Things will include all new works created in the past six months. The exhibition will showcase eight new large relief prints. These framed works will be for sale along with the unframed prints in the edition and other smaller prints of various subjects. The artist will be donating a portion of all sales made during the duration of the show to Mabel Wadsworth Center.

Johnson has lived and worked in Bangor for over fifteen years and this is her fourth solo show in the area and second at the Sohns Gallery. Johnson works as the Senior Museum Educator and Marketing Manager at the University of Maine Museum of Art in Downtown Bangor. She received her Masters of Fine Art in Intermedia in 2012 from the University of Maine and has been an active member of the creative community since her arrival in Maine in 2003.

This is the second exhibition of Johnson’s work at the Sohns Gallery. The first showing was a large scale evolving painting which was the inaugural show in the gallery. Having focused on painting for many years, Johnson has now turned to printmaking to create her images. Regarding this shift Johnson stated, “I’ve always painted large, flat areas of color with bold line work, very much in the style of a screen print or relief print. I thought it was time I finally made that leap to fully delve into the process of printmaking.”

March Exhibitions at Greenhut Galleries

Tim Christensen, Tunk Stream Blackwoods Porcelain 14 x 6 x 6 inches

These exhibitions are shown from March 7 – 30 with an opening reception on March 7 from 5-7.  Tim Christensen will give a talk on March 9 at 1 and Henry Isaacs on March 16 at 1.
Greenhut is pleased to announce its first exhibition of work by printmaker, PMA Biennial featured porcelain artist, environmentalist, and writer, Tim Christensen. The exhibition is titled, “In Response to Chaos” and the work featured in this show is the culmination of his latest sea voyage.
When I googled “Container Ship Passage Australia” 2-1/2 years ago, it was with the intention that I would create a body of work that would chronicle an odyssey. I had been asked to present my pecha kucha talk, “Art in the Holocene Extinction” in Cooroy, Queensland, and from this invitation, I created a “mega-transect,” a study of the Earth’s systems that would come to span the major oceans, 6 of the 7 continents, and take me around the world using about 5 gallons of crude oil. I would experience the heat of the Sudanese Red Sea, the wet of the Bornean Jungle, the loneliness of the Pacific, the space of the Australian bush, and the chaos of living in places where everything is unfamiliar and new. I would experience hurricanes, typhoons, pirates, state security services, dingos, snakes, insects, flying fish, whales, sharks, sea snakes, macaques, leeches, superstition, inescapable reality, and plastic. I would see rare birds, rare sea creatures, rare atmospheric events, rare primates, and catch rare glimpses into lives- foreign and internal. In setting out to experience the world’s most remote places, I committed to recording my experiences in as many durable, tangible, and recognizable ways I could think of.
I had two rules for this project: “Make everything possible as new as possible,” and “Always say, ’Yes.’” The resulting work reflects my observations of subjects internal and external. I looked at everything as equally valid and important, from traditional math- based-scientific data to more abstractly emotional and philosophical ideas.
I have used infinitely durable porcelain and universal visual language (Art!), to communicate what I saw across time, language, culture, and geographic barriers. These artifacts are designed to last tens of thousands of years and be accessible to anyone or anything with an eyeball and the ability to think abstractly. I conveyed the intimate daily experiences of the first voyage in that most personal of ways: by writing a book. Reflect, Adapt, and Persevere, co-written by Carri Lange and bound by Anna Low, was made using archival paper and inks, a self-created font of my handwriting, original drawings and intaglio prints, and a combination of ancient and modern silk screen printing processes and materials. During my travels, I used durable and portable etching plates and ancient drypoint to record my environment, often en plein air, capturing each day’s most compelling event, and later learned intaglio printing to create multiple images of what I saw. In all cases, I have “shown my work”, allowing the growth in the way I express myself to be evident alongside that which I was expressing.
Tim Christensen lives in Maine, splitting his time between Franklin and Roque Bluffs.

Henry Isaacs, Budapest Street 7 x 5 inches, Oil on panel

 

In the side gallery this month, Greenhut presents another travel-themed exhibition: Travel Notes, small paintings by Henry Isaacs. Writer and art critic, Dan Kany, has authored a booklet to accompany the show. An excerpt from Henry’s introduction to the Travel Notes booklet:
Sicily, Spring 2014. I am sitting in a cafe in front of Il Duomo di Cefalù on a Sunday morning. It is a quiet, sunny place. The vast space is empty. My palettes and brushes are set. My first sketch is exciting, and so I set to work. It was a Sunday, and after mass the children were the first out, and some ran over to me, curious to see what I was doing. Soon enough, there was a bunch of people around me. The waiter was happy because there was much more business. I worked very slowly because I was really comfortable, and I had plenty of time since Donna was off shopping. I heard one man say to the kids, ‘He seems nice. Go. Ask him about the colors. Why is he using those colors?’ ‘Lui sembra simpati-co. Vai.’ They did. I teased the children: ‘Do you have a problem with my colors?’ ‘No, sir! Grandfather. Where do you get those colors?’ ‘These are the best colors in the world,’ I replied in my broken Italian, ’Where do you think I get them?’ After a bit of back and forth about the best colors in the world, I said — finally — ‘Sicilia!’ They all cheered and the drinks came out, including an herb liqueur that was foul and tasted like 250% alcohol. They cheered again when I raised my glass and said, ‘Here’s to the colors of Sicilia!’ and we all toasted.
This story has repeated itself around the world so often that I am surprised when some version of it doesn’t happen. Painting on the tea terraces of Rwanda, women stop and watch from a respectful distance, and though I speak no Kinyarwanda, there is a smile, an exchange, a question, a brush tried out. Mayan children gather in highland villages in Guatemala and teach me the names of colors in K’iche’. In a small yurt in the mountains of central Japan, I work alongside my ninety-year-old Japanese friend while he paints his long scrolls. Near Black Mountain, Maine, I sit for the day painting small panels in August. Friends, family, and strangers join me for minutes or hours painting for the first or the umpteenth time as we chat away on the most splendid of days.
So many of my paintings have such records of companionship and stories embedded in them. I don’t necessarily remember all the details when I bring them back to my studio, but I remember enough. Art for me has never been a private undertaking. I mean it to be shared. My story of Sicily could just as easily have taken place on the Eastern Prom in Portland, Maine….
I hope the work and I always remain sembra simpatico.
Henry Isaacs received his BFA in Painting from the Rhode Island School of Design and his MFA in Printmaking from the Slade School of Fine Art in England. He has taught and lectured around the world and his work is in numerous public and private collections. When not traveling the world, Henry splits his time between Portland and Vermont.

Tidemark Gallery Show: The Word Made Art

Tidemark Gallery + Café is pleased to present “The Word Made Art,” a group art exhibition to mark this year’s celebration of Herman Melville’s 200th birthday with works inspired by the the American Renaissance (1820-1860). Participating visual artists offer, in their chosen media, responses to literary works of men and women from the seminal era of American Romanticism: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Edger Allen Poe, Emily Dickinson, and others.

The artists featured in the show will include: Chris Augusta, Barbara Vanderbilt, David Peloquin, Sandy Griffin, Linda Gallion, Stephanie Muri, Susanna Lasker, Pat Parks, Lucy Martin, Stephanie Chamberlin, Alana VanDerwerker, Martha Truscott, and Helen Richmond Webb.

“The Word Made Art” will run through the first week in May, 2019. The artists will be present at the opening reception Sunday, March 2nd from 2 – 5 p.m. Gallery hours are 10-5, Wednesday through Friday, and 10-2 Saturdays. For additional information please find us on Facebook or at 902 Main Street, Waldoboro, 207 832-5109.

The Framemakers host Cozy Retreat Exhibition and Curates Gallery at The Last Unicorn

David Clinard

 

The Framemakers in Watervill host Cozy Retreat Exhibition from January 15 through March 13.

Artist collections on display include:
Mixed Media by Todd Devin Burns;
Photography by David Clinard;
Acrylics by Barbara Chase;
Jewelry by Kami Thorpe;
Prints & Earrings by Greta Joseph.
Also featuring the first public showing of “Mirsad and Cousin” by Larry Stanton.

 

Barbara Chase

Craft items such as Pottery and Art Cards are available
for purchase throughout the exhibit.

Also,

 

Ryan Kohler

 

We are excited to announce that we are partnering with The Last Unicorn Restaurant in the curation of their gallery. This exhibit includes the works of Ryan Kohler. His artwork will be displayed in both dining areas until March 13th.

Cynthia Winings Gallery’s MID-WINTER Valentine’s Day Show


The Cynthia Winings Gallery in Blue Hill presents: The Mid-Winter Valentine’s Day Show: A group exhibition featuring the artworks of Louise Bourne, Jenny Brillhart, Molly Blake, Avy Claire, Devta Doolan, Sarah Doremus, Heather Lyon, Buzz Masters, Bill Mayher, Cynthia Winings and Goody-B. Wiseman!

 

Buzz Masters

 

 

Evening Reception: Friday, February 8, 5:00 – 8PM. 

Please Join me for this One Day Event where the Art will Warm Your Heart And Soul – There will be Refreshments and Good Company, too.
PLEASE DRESS WARMLY. Everyone is Welcome!

News & Opportunities from the Maine Crafts Association

MCA Program Calendar: Upcoming Events and Deadlines

2019

Jan 15: Sign Up Deadline for Maine Gallery Guide Co-Op Ad

Jan 19: M2M Workshop: Speed Designing with Jolene McGowan

Jan 31: Portland Fine Craft Show Application Deadline

February: Registration opens for Maine Craft Weekend

Feb15: Sign Up Deadline for Mother’s Day Ad in Downeast Magazine

April 5: Sign Up Deadline for June Maine Magazine Co-Op Ad

May 3: Sign Up Deadline for July Downeast Magazine Co-Op Ad

May 9-12: Annual MCA Workshop Weekend @ Haystack

June 9: Public Opening Reception MCA Master Craft Artist Ten-Year Anniversary Exhibition @ Fuller Craft Museum

June 1: 2019 Seconds & Supplies SALE @ Running with Scissors

June 28: Sign Up Deadline for Portland Monthly Art Annual Co-Op Ad

Sept 6: Sign Up Deadline for November Downeast Magazine Co-Op Ad

Oct 5-6: Maine Craft Weekend 2019

 

APPLY by January 31, 2019

Call for exhibitors for the 5th Annual Portland Fine Craft Show, August 24 from 9am-5pm on Congress Street in Portland, ME. Apply as a fine craft artist working in baskets, ceramics, fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, stone or wood. The Portland Fine Craft Show remains one of the only Maine craft shows open to artists not living in Maine, and has a reputation for being well-organized and high quality, with high attendance.

PORTLAND FINE CRAFT SHOW 2019 JURORS

Elena Kubler | Owner/Curator, The Turtle Gallery
Kazeem Lawal | Owner/Curator, Portland Trading Co.
Anja Levitties | Chair, 2019 Philadelphia Museum of Art Contemporary Craft Show

 

January 19, 2019: Speed Designing with Jolene McGowan

Are you looking to grow your 2019 audience and further your visual web presence? Join us in Ellsworth at Artsworth for a new professional development workshop! Participants will leave this workshop with their own Mailchimp account and a completed promotional flier designed and created in Adobe Spark featuring their work or business. All of this will be accomplished in one workshop, setting the participant up for future promotions.

 

Catch the Fall Exhibitions at the Colby Museum

Torkwase Dyson, Nautical Dusk installation, 2018

 

The Colby College Museum of Art creates academically robust and engaging exhibitions. This fall, the Colby Museum is pleased to present the following exhibitions: Torkwase Dyson: Nautical Dusk (through January 6, 2019), Darkness Visible: Goya Prints from the Lunder Collection (through January 20, 2019), Nancy Spero: Unbound (through January 20, 2019), and Currents 8: Carly Glovinski (through February 17, 2019).

Torkwase Dyson: Nautical Dusk
At the invitation of the Museum, the New Jersey-based artist Torkwase Dyson visited Waterville to consult archival materials related to Samuel Osborne (c. 1833–1904). Born into slavery on a Virginia plantation, Osborne migrated to Maine in 1865 and served as a Colby College janitor from 1867 to 1903. In the works she produced for Nautical Dusk, Dyson combines simple geometric forms infused with metaphorical associations found in obituaries of Osborne written by unnamed white authors. These texts raise questions about authorship, transmission, and self-determination, all issues that she will continue to unpack over the run of the show. Nautical Dusk features sculptures and paintings that explore these subjects in a formal register through intimacy, liquidity, and reflectiveness. What results are expanded dimensions of space. Occupying half the gallery is a work entitled Dusk, a monolithic ramp that functions as an architectural intervention, activating the space and inviting engagement or contemplation. It suggests a promontory, an outcropping from which to scan or surveil, but also a structure partially submerged.

Torkwase Dyson (b. 1973) was born in Chicago, Illinois, and spent her developmental years between North Carolina and Mississippi before earning her BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University and her MFA from the Yale School of Art. She was recently included in the 2018 group exhibition Between the Waters at the Whitney Museum of American Art and will be included in the 2019 Sharjah Biennial.

 

Carly Glovinski, Canyon Picnic, 2018. Acrylic on laser-cut plexiglass; acrylic on paper, photographs, plexiglass, wood.

 

Currents 8: Carly Glovinski
Established by the Colby Museum in 2004, the Currents exhibition series is dedicated to emerging artists with connections to Maine. For the eighth installment of the series, Carly Glovinski has created a group of works for a two-part exhibition on the theme of landscape that is on view currently at the Colby Museum and the Waterville Public Library. At the Colby Museum the commissioned works include painted sculptures and works on paper inspired by works in the Lunder Collection, several of which are on view in an adjacent gallery arranged by the artist. For the portion of the exhibition mounted at the Waterville Public Library, Glovinski has produced a group of three-dimensional paintings that closely resemble books in the library’s collection. These painted objects are exhibited on the library’s shelves. Designed to be explored by the hand and eye, they can be discovered by library patrons via a finding aid.

The Currents 8 catalogue will be available in late 2018 and will feature essays by Lunder Curator of American Art Elizabeth Finch and the writer Heidi Julavits.

Carly Glovinski (b. 1981) holds a BFA from Boston University and has shown her work nationally. She grew up in Berwick, Maine, and has a studio in nearby Rollinsford, New Hampshire.

 

Francisco de Goya, El sueño de la razón produce monstruos from Los Caprichos, 1799. Bound set of 80 intaglios on cream laid paper, 12 1/4 x 8 1/8 x 7/8 in.

 

Darkness Visible: Goya Prints from the Lunder Collection
During his lifetime the Spanish artist Francisco de Goya (1746–1828) was known for his commissioned works, but his independently produced prints are arguably his greatest achievement. This focused exhibition from the Lunder Collection includes a bound copy of Goya’s Los Caprichos (1799), accompanied by a digital resource that allows visitors to see an image of each print in the order Goya established for the series. The exhibition also includes a 19th-century commentary, or “key” to the series, by an unknown writer.

Darkness Visible: Goya Prints from the Lunder Collection is organized to coincide with an exhibition of the work of Nancy Spero (1926–2009), one of many artists who have been inspired by Goya’s visionary creations as a graphic artist.

 

Nancy Spero, Liberty – Athlete, 1995. Handprinting and printed collage on paper, 24 1⁄2 x 38 1⁄2 in.

 

Nancy Spero: Unbound
For more than five decades, Nancy Spero (1926–2009) pioneered a feminist art practice that fiercely defied the social expectations imposed on women. Using a lexicon of appropriated imagery, Spero envisioned, as she observed in 1987, “all manner of processions, conflicts, interruptions and disruptions.” Her hybrid artworks made in protest against war and in celebration of the liberated female body constitute Nancy Spero: Unbound, an exhibition organized in conjunction with a concurrent presentation of Francisco Goya’s prints, which Spero first encountered as an aspiring young artist.

Spanning the artist’s entire career, Nancy Spero: Unbound includes one of her earliest surviving works: a lithograph dating from around 1950, depicting an ecstatic dancer whose outstretched limbs resist containment. In 1966, when Spero initiated a truculent series of drawings to protest the Vietnam War, she began to work primarily on and with paper, a material she preferred for its versatility and economy. She subsequently introduced the use of collaged images made from cutouts of her prints. She also joined paper sheets end to end to create vertical and horizontal scrolls, often composing on a monumental scale.

The expressions of ecstasy and protest that defined Spero’s early practice gave way to representations of the female subject as an “activator” in works derived from found and altered images, sometimes with accompanying quotations. Late in life Spero explored her visual lexicon in new and even more expansive sites, drawing and printing directly on the wall and revisiting her Vietnam War–era imagery to create one of her last major works, Maypole: Take No Prisoners II (2008), a towering, multi-part sculpture that serves as the exhibition’s arresting centerpiece.

Betts Gallery celebrates annual ‘Holiday Galleria’

 

This December, Betts Gallery celebrates the holidays with their annual ‘Holiday Galleria’ show, joining in on the Belfast Holiday Artwalk with an opening reception, Friday December 7th, 5:30-8pm. The exhibit of local, affordable art, in a variety of media includes works by: Sally Brophy, Jennie Connor, Susan Cooney, Julie Cyr, Kris Engman, Sarah Faragher, Helene Ferrar, Conny Hatch, David Jacobson, Sheep Jones, Mark Kelly, Allegra Kuhn, Kathleen Mack, Leslie Moore, Willy Reddick, Wes Reddick, Betty Schopmeyer, Lesia Sochor, Kay Sullivan, Mary Trotochaud and Peter Walls. Be sure to check in often, as the show, which runs from December 7th through the 22nd, will be changing throughout the month as sold pieces are replaced by new work.

8x10x100 and Holiday Members Show at The Harlow

The Harlow is home of the Kennebec Valley Art Association, a non-profit celebrating its 60th anniversary on December 1, 2018. The public is invited to celebrate the occasion and attend the opening reception for both 8x10x100 and our annual Holiday Members Show & Sale on Saturday, December 1st from 5-7pm.  Both are on view from December 1-29.
  • During8x10x100, all artworks measure 8×10 inches and are available for sale for the affordable price of $100 each. 50% of sales benefit programming at The Harlow while the other 50% goes directly to the artist.
  • The Harlow’s annual Holiday Members Show & Sale celebrates the diverse artwork styles of Harlow artist members and is a tradition dating back to the founding of the Gallery in 1963.
  • During both the 8x10x100 and the Members Show, work by Maine artists representing a wide range of media can be purchased off the wall and taken home the same day. The public is invited to visit The Harlow and support local artists by choosing unique and handcrafted gifts this holiday season.

Exhibitions are always free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Wednesday-Saturday, 12-6pm.