Archive for virtual

CMCA’s ArtLab for All Ages to be held Oct. 3

ArtLab

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA) invites artists of all ages to take part in an ArtLab for All Ages workshop from 2 to 4 p.m. Oct. 3.

Participants will join ArtLab Educator Alexis Iammarino in creating mini assemblage sculptures inspired by the CMCA 2020 biennial exhibition.

Following CDC guidelines, the workshop will be offered by reservation with 20 seats available. Stay for the entire workshop or just an hour. The workshop is free of charge, but reservations are required. To reserve a spot, email Alexis Iammarino at aiammarino@cmcanow.org.

Weather permitting, the workshop will take place in the CMCA courtyard. In the case of inclement weather, the workshop will be held indoors with face coverings required and social distancing observed. The workshop will also be streamed live on facebook.com/cmcanow, for those who prefer to participate virtually.

CMCA is located at 21 Winter St., Rockland, Maine. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, go to https://cmcanow.org/event/artlab-for-all-ages-october-2020.

New issue of MMPA Antidote now available online

Jessica Burko, “Connections, From the Found Gone series” (detail).

In response to COVID-19 stay-at-home orders and local closings, the Maine Museum of Photographic Arts in Portland began creating the online series MMPA Antidote, which includes photographic artwork, audio interviews, and artist statements and reflections from Maine artists, aimed to serve as inspiration during times of isolation.

Published bi-weekly, Antidote features contemporary photographers and interviews with industry experts.

Visit www.mainemuseumofphotographicarts.org to view the most recent issue.

Investigate the links, share the images, and send some of your own to contact.mmpa@gmail.com.

New issue of MMPA Antidote now available online

Sara Stites, “June and Tower.”

In response to COVID-19 stay-at-home orders and local closings, the Maine Museum of Photographic Arts in Portland began creating the online series MMPA Antidote, which includes photographic artwork, audio interviews, and artist statements and reflections from Maine artists, aimed to serve as inspiration during times of isolation.

A new issue of MMPA Antidote is available online at www.mainemuseumofphotographicarts.org.

Work by Sara Stites is featured in this issue.

“My work has always had an organic, visceral aspect which I consider to be part of my concern with life issues, like vulnerability, passion and the uncanny,” she writes. “Much of it explores a paradox; sensitivity to deeply guarded inner stories coexists with a satiric playfulness, exploring the pathetic and the comic. Using mostly functional objects from the studio, I have been building precarious, tentative ‘sculptures’ in front of drawings and paintings that contain figurative elements as well as marks and erasures. These sculptural objects mimic, in 3D, the hue and form articulated in the drawing. Manipulation of the light source and shadows further a process of refinement and integration, particularly when the result has been photographed as the final “artifact” of the process. Objects, like a careful drawing, become democratized when considered within my photos where other materials are placed alongside the drawing. I celebrate the studio through the use of detritus, whatever is at hand, waiting to be repurposed in the photograph. The imagery becomes a melding of abstraction and representation, always considering gravity, air and light.”

Investigate the links, share the images, and send some of your own to contact.mmpa@gmail.com.

Meet the artists of MFT’s Bicentennial show ‘200 Years of Farming’ at virtual artist talk

“Why Buy the Cow,” by James Southard.

To mark Maine’s Bicentennial year, this show focuses on some of the history, practices, triumphs, and challenges of farming in Maine over the last 200 years — from homesteading to dairy, potatoes, blueberries, the local food movement, and present-day changes and challenges.

This exhibit encompasses a wide range of media to depict just some of the rich history of farming in Maine. Maine Farmland Trust is proud to partner with the Penobscot Marine Museum to exhibit seven glass-plate photographic prints on loan from the Eastern Collection of oxen, draft horse teams, and scenes of the harvests of corn and potatoes. Also on display are six black and white photographs from PMM’s new collection by Kosti Ruohomaa, courtesy of Black Star Publishing Company, depicting crisp, clear images of hard working farmers in their daily lives.

Join a few of the artists featured in the show, along with Kevin Johnson, curator and collections manager from the Penobscot Marine Museum, and others to talk about some of the history of Maine farming and the inspiration of its people and landscape during a virtual artist talk from 5 to 6 p.m. Aug. 21.

Learn more about the artists and their work at https://www.mainefarmlandtrust.org/200-years-of-farming-a-bicentennial-celebration. View the full exhibit at https://artcld.com/show/maine-farmland-trust-gallery-200-years-of-farming-a-bicentennial-celebration.

RSVP for Virtual Artist Talks at https://donate-now.mainefarmlandtrust.org/event/200-years-of-farming-a-bicentennial-celebration-artist-talks/e292839.

Join visual arts resident James Southard, academic writing resident Sophie Kelmenson, and several guests for a chance to learn more about their work during a virtual open studio from 6 to 7 p.m. Aug. 25.

Join Margot Kelley, the literary arts resident for September, and several guests to learn more about her work during the September Virtual Open Studio from 6 to 7 p.m. Sept. 30.

Maine Farmland Trust is a statewide, member-powered nonprofit working to protect farmland, support farmers, and advance the future of farming.

Maine artists donate to Maine Medical in new online exhibition ‘Sheltered in Place’

“Isolation,” by Nora Tryon.

Maine artists donate to Maine Medical in new online exhibition

Although the Union of Visual Artists (UMVA) Gallery, inside the Portland Media Center at 516 Congress St. in Portland, is not open yet, UMVA artists produced the online exhibition “Sheltered in Place.” The show’s work reflects artists’ thoughts and feelings on both the coronavirus pandemic and the pandemic of racism. A portion of any art sale from this show will be donated to Maine Medical Center for COVID-19 protective measures.

“The images and words of UMVA artists in this online exhibition surface from the isolation and compression of life in the pandemic,” said John Ripton, UMVA-Portland co-chairperson. “The works express personal and universal struggles. There are abstract and figurative pieces and a variety of media from painting and mixed media to photography and digital work. We hope you will plumb the depth of these highly personal interpretations and that one or more of the pieces will touch your spirit. Last, we believe community and society is the source of great art and we dedicate this work to first-responders everywhere.”

View the show at https://umvaportlandgallery.blogspot.com/2020/07/sheltered-in-place-pandemic-art-show.html.

‘The Sea Hypnotic’ at Kigel Studio

Jean Kigel

Jean Kigel Studio presents “The Sea Hypnotic,” Jean Kigel’s fourth theme show of the season. This is available for viewing in person at 1396 Back Cove Road in Waldoboro and virtually at www.jeankigel.com from Aug. 7 to 21.

There’s something about water that draws us in and fascinates us. It creates peace and awe — and fear and exhilaration. It releases the stresses of everyday life. From Ishmael in “Moby Dick” to Maine summer rusticators, the sea captivates us.

Like many artists, Kigel has been captivated by the sights and sounds of the sea, and it’s made its way into her work.

Her paintings depict the edges and surfaces of the vast Atlantic, with its surging waves and its mirrored surfaces. Watercolors were her first and most-natural medium for painting this fluid substance. With watercolors, she loves to meld blues with purples and greens. With her Asian brush painting (another water-based media), water soaks into rice paper and spreads slowly softening edges of the sea with the shore. She also uses oils to create the geometric slashes of light and tide that cut the cove in front of her studio.

Visitors are welcome to stop in at Kigel Studio, following Maine’s CDC health guidelines. For more information, email jean@jeankigel.com or call 832-5152.

New issue of MMPA Antidote now available online

“La Fleur du Soleil Series,” by Barbara Goodbody.

In response to COVID-19 stay-at-home orders and local closings, the Maine Museum of Photographic Arts in Portland began creating the online series MMPA Antidote, which includes photographic artwork, audio interviews, and artist statements and reflections from Maine artists, aimed to serve as inspiration during times of isolation.

Joel R. Ferris, a donor who helped launch MMPA, says, “On Fridays after work, I pour a glass of wine and look and read the site and pretend I’m on Portland’s First Friday art walk.”

A new issue of MMPA Antidote is available online at www.mainemuseumofphotographicarts.org.

Investigate the links, share the images, and send some of your own to contact.mmpa@gmail.com.

Annex Arts hosts Village Reads

Annex Arts’ summer programming is in full swing with virtual activities that celebrate storytelling.

The Village Reads program is off and running. In the spirit of the international City Reads and One City, One Book programs, Village Reads is rooted in the belief that better understanding of our world, our community and ourselves can more powerfully emerge through reading and discussing impactful books together.

To participate, simply read the selected book, register for Village Reads at https://annexarts.org/registration to get updates, read Annex reader-in-residence Sonja Krušič O’Donnell’s blog at  https://annexarts.org/villagereads-blog to receive notices and interactive “bonus content” to accompany the reading, and attend the live, interactive virtual author events.

“Call Me American,” by Abdi Nor Iftin, reading starts on July 15 and the virtual author event is at 4 p.m. Monday, Aug. 10.

If you haven’t already bought your book, be sure to reserve/pre-order a book at Compass Rose Books or your local village bookseller soon so that we can be sure to accommodate your book needs. Witherle Public Library and Blue Hill Public Library have several copies to borrow.

Learn more at annexarts.org.

Meet Fiore Art Center’s (virtual) artist-in-residence

Katie Addada Shlon. Photo courtesy of the artist.

In lieu of Open Studio Days at Maine Farmland Trust’s Joseph A. Fiore Art Center, guests can join virtual open studios this summer to learn more about what’s happening and see what the art center’s summer residents are up to. The event runs from 5 to 6 p.m. July 29.

During the July virtual open studio, guests will meet Katie Addada Shlon, the art center’s virtual performance artist in residency. Fiore Art Center welcomed Addada Shlon in July.

Addada Shlon uses the natural environment as a collaborator in their work. Their current body of work focuses on creating new instruments for sound, departing from traditional forms and structures to reframe our experience of music as bodied participants.

“Viewing the land as a living system which requires love and care, I turn my focus to restorative and regenerative agriculture practices which serve that need,” Addada Shlon said. “The issues of public health, land health, individual health, growth and nourishment are all connected but can be made invisible in everyday life.”

Addada Shlon will share her work by sharing a film. The screening will be followed by a panel conversation and audience Q&A with  Katie Addada Shlon, Heather Lyon (past performance artist and residence) and Sarah Simon (Maine Farmland Trust’s farm access and farm viability director). Opening and closing remarks will be given by Karen Giles, gallery coordinator at Maine Farmland Trust.

Joseph A. Fiore Art Center. Photo courtesy of MFT.

RSVP for the virtual open studio at https://donate-now.mainefarmlandtrust.org/event/july-virtual-open-studio/e291476 to receive a Zoom link to the event.

Artist residencies are a way for each artist to further their work as it reflects on agriculture, environment and our current times.

Check the MFT website at mainefarmlandtrust.org and social media platforms (facebook.com/mainefarmlandtrust, @mainefarms and @mft_gallery on Instagram) to follow the progress of the residents’ work and stay connected with the virtual open studio days.

Pemaquid Art Gallery’s Arter and Busch deliver contrasting style and vision

“Full Hold and Homeward Bound,” an oil painting by Stephen Busch of South Bristol, reflects the painter’s love and abiding respect for the sea.

This summer, The Pemaquid Group of Artists offers an opportunity for art lovers to view and purchase the group’s art through its expanded website, www.pemaquidartgallery.com.

The PAG Board decided not to open its physical gallery space this season due to COVID-19 risks and instead the public is encouraged to survey its art online.

Two of the Pemaquid Group of Artists, both with vastly different visions, are illustrative of the wide range of styles among the 30-member group. Debra Arter’s dynamic and colorful multi-media work and Stephen Busch’s apparently simple but mysterious narrative and realistic paintings in acrylic and oil are highlighted here.

Arter is a well-known Maine artist and art educator recognized for her printmaking and collage, but she also enjoys painting and assemblage. Sometimes travel and location dictate which medium she uses. She also favors those mediums that allow layering and have a textural component. She is continually inspired by the Maine landscape but interprets it in a free manner, working outdoors in the summer and in the studio in the winter. The end result is a restless and colorful mix of abstraction and realism.

Deb Arter’s colorful mix of abstraction and realism is evident in her “The Whole World Smiled at Once,” a recent piece.

She earned a BA degree in art education and a master’s degree in Fine Arts. She has taught printmaking extensively in the mid-coast area. She also teaches printmaking at the Mid Coast Printmakers and is leading instruction on her sun porch for travelers and groups.

Busch, in contrast, has a clear storytelling approach to his painting in oil and acrylic on canvas. His knowledge of ships and ship construction and his abiding respect for the sea is evident in many of his paintings. His subjects include tales of the sea, often depicting historic scenes of whalers and fishermen at work, and he also paints present-day fishermen, people going about their daily activities and landscapes. But even his landscapes have a narrative quality about them, suggesting a story and pulling the viewer in to enjoy that story and a certain mystery.

Busch was raised in a family rich in art and a connection to the sea and sailing. He graduated from the Maritime College at Fort Schuyler, New York, and spent eight years at sea in the merchant marine and holds an unlimited U.S.C.G. Masters license. He pursued art studies informally at the Silvermine Guild of Artists and Norwalk Community College, both in Connecticut, and later at Round Top Center for the Arts in Damariscotta. He has provided artwork for the covers of several books, and his work has been in solo and group shows in many midcoast Maine locations.