Archive for Wiscasset

Sylvan Gallery Late Summer Exhibition

Island Cottage by Neal Hughes, oil, 18” x 24”

Sylvan Gallery’s “Late Summer Exhibition” is continually evolving as new works arrive daily, painted by the Gallery’s roster of fine contemporary artists. September marks the gallery’s 18th year of representing a diverse and extremely talented group of New England artists. To celebrate, the Gallery will host a reception on Thursday, September 27, the evening of the Wiscasset Art Walk, from 5pm to 8pm. The exhibition continues through October 28th.

New arrivals include a collection of eleven paintings by New Jersey artist Neal Hughes. A recent viewer has already remarked how “ he paints all my favorite subjects.” Trains, old trucks, forest streams, and boatyards provide inspiration for Hughes who has remarkable skill at capturing a scene “en plein air.” In “Woodland Stream,” quick short strokes of paint describe the curve of the fallen tree branches over the swiftly moving water, and the foliage is painted in natural tones of green against darker woodland shadows. The painting evokes the feeling of the 19th century Barbizon school, who were the first artists to paint directly from nature, combining elements of Tonalism and Impressionism.

Hughes’s painting, “Island Cottage,” in contrast, is a light airy painting which captures the aged texture of a Monhegan cottage amidst brilliant tiger lilies and deft flecks of violet and yellow, representing the blooms of other late summer flowers. The painting is exuberant in color and brushwork. A few of his other new paintings include, “The Mary Day at Camden,” a painting of a boatyard titled, “Essex Idle,” and a collection of old cars that are being stored in a barn in “Hidden Away.”

Hughes is a former illustrator who has been painting professionally for over 30 years. His work has been accepted into national juried exhibitions, and he has won many awards including an Award of Excellence at the prestigious International Marine Art Exhibition at the Gallery at Mystic Seaport. He was the grand prize winner of the Utrecht 60th Anniversary Art Competition, winning the top prize out of more than 12,000 entries.

The Quiet Season by Susannah Haney, oil, 8” x 10”

Susannah Haney of Wiscasset, returns this summer to bring us her well-composed views of Monhegan Island cottages. “Miss Millie at School” depicts the Monhegan schoolhouse with its mascot, a golden retriever, at rest in the doorway. The flora is finely detailed and the painting is rich in warm summer light and cool shadows. Haney also treats us to two new paintings from her exploration of Stonington, Maine. Both are scenes of the same house at dusk. In “The Quiet Season,” the house is situated at the edge of the road, illuminated by a street lamp. There is a delicate transition in the merging of the light and shadows. In the second painting, “The Old Mansard,” the focus is on the side view of the building, its water reflection and surrounding granite rocks. There’s a distant glow from the setting sun, but again, the street lamps provide the source of the scene’s illumination. Haney achieves a sense of solitude and one of quiet mood in these two works.

 

New Harbor Morning by Robert Noreika, oil, 30” x 40”

 

Robert Noreika ’s newest painting, “New Harbor Morning,” measures 30 by 40 inches and is one of the largest paintings in the exhibit. Noreika captures a representation of what he sees by using a working harbor as a jumping off point to create rhythmic patterns of lines and shapes that weave in and out of the landscape. Docks become slashes of color, buildings and rooftops are broadly painted, lobster boats reflect the brilliance of morning light, and the hillside and tree beyond are a nice juxtaposition to all the activity in the harbor. The water is a beautiful mix of almost all the colors of the painting: golds, blues and violets with dashes of orange and reds accents. Noreika captures nature’s light and creates paintings that are spontaneous, fluid and bold. His other paintings in the exhibition include paintings from Bailey’s Island and Monhegan Island.

Paul Batch is the newest artist to be represented by the gallery and his evocative atmospheric landscapes are a poetic response to the fleeting and ephemeral light cast by the passing sun or rising moon. He focuses on transitions, painting various times of day, changing weather, and the rich seasons that New England offers. In “Break in the Clouds,” Batch captures the momentary effects of blue sky and sunlight striking the ocean just as dark clouds begin to part. Another work of special note in the exhibition is a 30 by 30 inch painting titled, “Fading.” Batch captures the beautiful gradations that occur in the sky as the sun is beginning to set. A grouping of pine trees is silhouetted against the vast sky, and the painting feels illuminated from within.

Batch is an award -winning member of Oil Painters of America and Portrait Society of America. His work has appeared in numerous publications including the Artist’s Magazine, International Artist and Fine Art Connoisseur.

Maine artists whose work will also be on view include Stan Moeller (York), whose newest oils include two 12 by 16 inch paintings titled “Churning” and “Twilight Surf.” They evoke the power and beauty of Monhegan’s coastal landscape. Shepherdess and photojournalist Nina Fuller (Hollis), presents a collection of photographic images of Scottish Blackface Sheep, and Ann Scanlan (Wiscasset), continues to explore the theme of animals in rural farm settings in her most recent painting of sheep in “The Cheviots of Straw’s Farm.”

Other represented artists who focus on Maine subjects include Peter Layne Arguimbau, whose painting of “Red Jacket,” a celebrated clipper, was built in Rockland, Maine, and was launched in 1853. Her first voyage set the speed record for sailing ships to cross the Atlantc by traveling from New York to Liverpool in 13 days, 1 hour, 25 minutes, dock to dock. Crista Pisano will be exhibiting small intimate paintings of Maine’s coast and is also presenting a larger atmospheric painting at 28 by 32 inches titled, “Marsh and Clouds.”

A selection of work by the gallery’s other contemporary artists will also be on display, including Joann Ballinger, Al Barker, Angelo Franco, Charles Kolnik, Heather Gibson Lusk, Polly Seip, Laura Winslow and Shirley Cean Youngs.

For more information, call 882-8290 or go to www.sylvangallery.com. The gallery is open Monday through Saturday, 10:30 a.m to 5:30 p.m., and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 49 Water St., Wiscasset, on the corner of Main Street (Route 1) and Water Street, next to Red’s Eats.

Kate Nordstrom and An Evening of Art and Garden at Carriage House Gardens

Starry Garden, an oil on canvas by Alna artist Kate Nordstrom, is one of her new garden series of paintings. The series of large canvases will be on exhibit during An Evening of Art and Garden on Saturday, August 18, in Wiscasset.

Alna artist Kate Nordstrom and Carriage House Gardens in Wiscasset are hosting ‘An Evening of Art and Garden’ on Saturday, August 18, 5:30pm to 8pm, to highlight the artist’s newest fantastical images on canvas. The public is invited to enjoy the gardens, sip something bubbly, listen to live music, and view Nordstrom’s original art and other treasures during the evening.

Nordstrom, a native of Connecticut but living in Alna, Maine for 15 years, established her reputation as an artist with a unique vision with her series of iconic buildings located throughout the region. The architectural portraits, from the historical Alna Meeting House to a humble local farm stand, are elegantly sparse but familiar – as if each building was revealing its story through the medium of Nordstrom’s canvas.

Artist Kate Nordstrom puts the finishing touches on Milagro, an oil on canvas, which will be exhibited during An Evening of Art and Garden on Saturday, August 18, in Wiscasset.

Her newest paintings, however, are a dramatic departure. The artist said she’s now allowing her creative vision to flow wherever it chooses, and the result is abstracted landscapes, boldly colorful images, and fantastical interpretations of the built and natural environment around her. “My newest paintings might fall into the category of magical realism. The paintings play with dreamlike imagery and pay little attention to the usual structure of things.” That is how, she explains, in her large oil painting ‘Rabbit in a Dory,’ a charming rabbit in a red dory keeps company with a vigilant crow as they sail over housetops through a darkening sky while other creatures see them on their way. “Those of us who are transfixed by nature are occasionally blessed by unusual sitings. My paintings speak of the mystery and science of our complex world.”

Another series of Nordstrom’s large canvases are her interpretation of gardens in various seasons. The paintings are bountifully floriferous and are unmistakably the artist’s own vision of garden essence. In ‘Starry Garden’, the blooms are mostly colored circles with several garden inhabitants perched among them. The playful garden transitions into an inky sky which then bursts into a luminous ether full of floating stars. Not a classic garden scene and yet so evocative of the earth’s energetic beauty. www.knpaintings.com

Carriage House Gardens in Wiscasset Village is the summertime home of Nordstrom’s work. Shop owner Lucia Droby finds a compatibility between the paintings, her gardens, and her shop’s offerings. “After making gardens for many years, the gardens here are the synthesis of all that experience – favorite colors and shapes with lots of experimenting with form,” she says. “Garden art, vessels, old and new furnishings, all seem to get along, and Kate’s paintings, with her unique imagery, fit in so well.” www.carriagehousegardens.com

All are welcome to ‘An Evening of Art and Garden’ at Carriage House Gardens, 62 Pleasant St., Wiscasset Village on Saturday, August 18, 2018, from 5:30pm to 8pm; rain or shine. Nordstrom will be donating 10% of paintings sold during the evening to Midcoast Conservancy, a regional land trust committed to protecting and promoting healthy lands, waters, and communities through conservation, outdoor adventure, and learning. www.midcoastconservancy.org

Wiscasset Bay Gallery Exhibition

Charles Yardley Turner (American,1850-1919), “Apple Blossoms," oil on canvas, 24" x 18"

Charles Yardley Turner (American,1850-1919), “Apple Blossoms,” oil on canvas, 24″ x 18″

The Impressionist’s Eye opens August 11th at the Wiscasset Bay Gallery in Wiscasset, Maine. Works by noted American and European artists from Spain, Italy, France, Switzerland, Austria, United States and Great Britain will be on display.

Of particular interest is an oil by Baltimore and New York artist Charles Yardley Turner (1850-1919) entitled “Apple Blossoms.” Exhibited at the 58th Annual Exhibition of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 1888, the delicately painted work shows one of the artist’s favorite models, Dorothy Fox, picking apple blossoms in a green, spring landscape. Turner’s paintings can be found in numerous public institutions including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Library of Congress.

A member of the National Academy of Design in New York with Turner was Maine born artist Walter Griffin (1861-1935). After studying art at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston with fellow artists Edmund Tarbell and Frank Benson, Griffin decided to head to Paris to study at the Academie Julian in 1887. This was the first of many trips to France and in 1911 he painted in the tiny village of Boigneville, south of Paris. Using thick impasto paint, Griffin captured a row of poplars in early fall.

Moving further south in France to the picturesque town of Saint Remy, the viewer sees the work of post-impressionist Rene Seyssaud’s (1867-1952) “Les Oliviers, Saint Remy.” The warm Provence landscape is depicted in vibrant oranges, earthy reds and yellow greens. The summer heat amidst the olive grove is palpable and the lively, energetic brushstrokes remind one of Seyssaud’s predecessor in Saint Remy, Vincent Van Gogh.

British impressionist Alfred Edward Borthwick (1871-1955) is represented by a charming portrait of a young girl in a sailor suit. Other European impressionists include Adolphe Clary-Baroux (French, 1865-1933), Vincent de Garcia Paredes (Spanish, 1845-1903), Charles Emile Hornung (Swiss, 1883-1956), Paul Cesar-Helleu (French, 1859-1927) and Edouard Manet (French, 1832-1883).

Additional American Impressionists works by Old Lyme artists Guy Wiggins (1883-1962) and Bruce Crane (1857-1937) are included as well as paintings by Robert Philipp (1895-1981), Scott Carbee (1860-1946) and Agnes Richmond (1870-1964).

“The Impressionist’s Eye” will continue at the Wiscasset Bay Gallery, 67 Main Street, Wiscasset, Maine through September 30th. For further information, call (207) 882-7682 or visit the gallery’s website at www.wiscassetbaygallery.com. The Wiscasset Bay Gallery is open daily from 10:00 am until 5:30 pm and is located at 67 Main Street (Route 1) in historic Wiscasset village.

“Monhegan to Paris” opens at the Wiscasset Bay Gallery

Fernand Herbo (French, 1905-1995), “Place Blanche, Paris" gouache, 19 1/4" x 23 1/2"

Fernand Herbo (French, 1905-1995), “Place Blanche, Paris” gouache, 19 1/4″ x 23 1/2″

“Monhegan to Paris” opens at the Wiscasset Bay Gallery in Wiscasset, Maine on Saturday, July 7th with a reception from 4:00 to 6:00 pm. The event is free and open to the public and light refreshments will be served.

Viewers to the show may wonder what two seemingly disparate places, the cosmopolitan metropolis of Paris and the remote island of Monhegan, ten miles off the Maine coast, have in common. Both developed as artist destinations in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Paris became an intellectual center for the arts with artists gathering in cafes for lively and heated debates. Monhegan, on the other hand, became an escape for many artists from New York and other urban areas and provided a freedom of exploration in a rugged, natural setting.

As Paris expanded rapidly during the Industrial Revolution and a bourgeois class began to develop, Parisian artists likewise sought to escape the city’s confines and soaring real estate prices. They retreated to the edge of the city in Montmartre, where some rural landscape remained with windmills, farms and cheap rent.

In Fernand Herbo’s (French, 1905-1995) colorful and dynamic gouache of “Place Blanche, Paris,” the viewer sees the foot of Montmartre and the bright red windmill of the Moulin Rouge. Opening in 1889, Moulin Rouge was an entertainment magnet for Paris bourgeois and artists alike. Auguste Grass-Mick (French, 1873-1963) captured the star of the Moulin Rouge, Louise Weber or La Goulue, in a vibrant pastel showing her profile in blues, greens and oranges. La Goulue was also a favorite of Henri Toulouse-Lautrec and he featured her on some of his most famous posters.

Traveling back across the Atlantic, the viewer observes Walter Farndon’s (American, 1876-1964) “Summer Day, Monhegan Harbor.” Farndon first came to Monhegan in the 1920’s and in this work he captures the warm afternoon light on the sailing and fishing boats contrasting the cool blues of the water and soft purples of the wharf. Contemporaries of Farndon, Charles Ebert (American, 1873-1959) and his wife Mary Roberts Ebert (American, 1873-1956) likewise explored the island rendering the village harbor and Manana island in both oils and watercolors. Other important Monhegan Island artists featured in the exhibition include Andrew Winter (American, 1893-1958), Jay Hall Connaway (American, 1893-1970), Samuel Peter Rolt Triscott (American, 1846-1925), Sears Gallagher (American, 1869-1955), Theophile Schneider (American, 1876-1960) and Morris Shulman (American, 1912-1978).

Walter Farndon (American, 1876-1964), “Summer Day, Monhegan Harbor,” oil on board, 14" x 18"

Walter Farndon (American, 1876-1964), “Summer Day, Monhegan Harbor,” oil on board, 14″ x 18″

Important Paris artists whose works are also on display include Francois Gall (French, 1912-1987), Edouard Manet (French, 1832-1883), Aristide Maillol (French, 1861-1944), Andre Derain (French, 1880-1954), Cesar Villacres (French, 1880-1941) and Lucien Genin (French, 1894-1953).

“Monhegan to Paris” will continue at the Wiscasset Bay Gallery, 67 Main Street, Wiscasset, Maine through August 8th. For further information, call (207) 882-7682 or visit the gallery’s website at www.wiscassetbaygallery.com. The Wiscasset Bay Gallery is open daily from 10:30 am until 6:00 pm and is located at 67 Main Street (Route 1) in historic Wiscasset village.

“On the Coast: Twentieth Century and Contemporary American Art”

Matthias Noheimer (1909-1982), “Three Gulls,” egg tempera, 18” x 20”

“On the Coast: Twentieth Century and Contemporary American Art” will open Saturday, May 26th at the Wiscasset Bay Gallery in Wiscasset, Maine.

 Among the featured works in the exhibition are recent oils by Judith Magyar including “October Moonrise, Maquoit Bay” with its clear, haunting light. David Kasman’s new paintings of Stonington, Maine and Monhegan Island have a weight and solidity of paint, which are energized by vigorous, free brushstrokes. Similarly, “Center Harbor” and “Island Poppies” by Keith Oehmig resonate with deep blues and purples captured in a loose, painterly manner. Other contemporary new artists showing in the exhibition include Michael Graves, Roberta Goschke, Guy Corriero, Diana Johnson, David Lussier, Tom McCobb and Paul Niemiec.

Keith Oehmig, “Island Poppies” oil on board, 14” x 18”

 Among the twentieth century American works highlighted in the show are Matthias Noheimer’s (1909-1982) egg tempera, “Three Gulls,” and Morris Shulman’s (1912-1978) geometric oil, “Horn’s Hill, Monhegan.” Other important American artists included in the exhibition are William Zorach (1887-1966), Gordon Grant (1875-1962), Jay Hall Connaway (1893-1970), Ernest Trova (1927-2009) and Robert Philipp (1895-1981).

 “On the Coast: Twentieth Century and Contemporary American Art” will be on display at the Wiscasset Bay Gallery, 67 Main Street, Wiscasset, Maine through July 6th. For more information, call (207) 882-7682 or visit the gallery’s website at www.wiscassetbaygallery.com. The Wiscasset Bay Gallery is open daily from 10:30 am until 5:00 pm and is located at 67 Main Street (Route 1) in historic Wiscasset village.

“Autumn Arrivals” opens at the Wiscasset Bay Gallery

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Helena Sturtevant (1872-1946), “In Her Dressing Room,” oil on canvas, 36″ x 24

“Autumn Arrivals” will open Saturday, October 14th at the Wiscasset Bay Gallery in Wiscasset, Maine. One of the most diverse shows of the year, the exhibition will span from Realism in the nineteenth century to Spanish, French and American Impressionism, to mid-century and contemporary art. Works by Paul Seignac (French, 1826-1904), Aristide Maillol (French, 1861-1944), Theresa Bernstein (American, 1890-2002), Augusto Junquera (Spanish, 1869-1942), Charles Emil Jacque (French, 1813-1894) and Alfred Chadbourn (American, 1921-1998) will be included.

Of particular interest is a colorful impressionist oil of a nude by Helena Sturtevant (American, 1872-1946) titled “In Her Dressing Room.” Sturtevant studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in the late nineteenth century under Edmund Tarbell and the Académie Colarossi in Paris. Unlike the École des Beaux Arts, the Académie Colarossi allowed female students to draw both male and female nude models and Sturtevant graduated with distinction.

Contrasting Sturtevant’s elegant interior painting is a lithograph by American Social Realist artist Georges Schreiber (American, 1904-1997). Schreiber was employed by the WPA as an artist during the Great Depression. In 1939, he travelled to forty eight states capturing the American rural scene with honesty and directness. “Twilight,” which was based on Schreiber’s painting “Wind in the Cornfield” utilizes strong darks and lights for emotional impact as a farm couple walks through a barren cornfield at dusk.

Other works by twentieth century and contemporary Maine artists include Chris Huntington, Keith Oehmig, David Kasman, Roberta Goschke, Guy Corriero, Diana Johnson, Paul Niemiec and Quincy Brimstein.

“Autumn Arrivals” will be on display at the Wiscasset Bay Gallery, 67 Main Street, Wiscasset, Maine through November 30th. For further information, call (207) 882-7682 or visit the gallery’s website at www.wiscassetbaygallery.com. The Wiscasset Bay Gallery is open daily from 10:30 am until 5:00 pm and is located at 67 Main Street (Route 1) in historic Wiscasset village.

Fall Arts Exhibition at Sylvan Gallery

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By the Blue Barrel by Susannah Haney, oil, 8” x 10”

Fall Arts Exhibition Now Through October 29th at Sylvan Gallery

Sylvan Gallery’s Fall Exhibition, featuring the work of contemporary New England artists, is now on view and will continue through October 29th. The gallery’s exhibitions are known for the quality of the work displayed and the unique and discernible style of the artists that are represented. Gallery goers will be charmed by the vision behind favorite Maine subjects such as Monhegan Island and Maine coastal and harbor views, local rural scenes focusing on domestic farm animals, and cafe and street scenes of Florence, Italy. New paintings by the gallery’s roster of fine artists arrive almost daily.

Featured works by Maine-based artists include those by Susannah Haney of Wiscasset. Haney spends several weeks every year sketching on Monhegan Island, a well-known and loved location that has been attracting artists since the19th century. Back in her studio in Wiscasset, she transforms the sketches into oil paintings of remarkable clarity and richness of color. In “By Blue Barrel,” Haney captures a view of a Monhegan cottage sited with Manana Island behind it. The luminous light of a gray day brings a glow to the violet-gray tones of the cottage and illuminates the dory in front of it. Her fine attention to detail delights us as she brings her focus to the outer stairway of the neighboring cottage, the lapis lazuli tone of the blue fish barrel, the granite rocks leading us from foreground to middle distance, and the dandelions whose spent blooms are now transformed to fluff. The luminous and finely detailed quality of her oil paintings has earned her collectors from all over the United States. Her other new paintings include “View From the Hill, Monhegan,” and “The Fishermen’s Museum, Pemaquid.”

Wiscasset artist and gallery owner, Ann Scanlan’s favorite subjects to paint are animals in rural farm settings. She will often follow cows as they wander across the landscape, looking for the right composition or interaction between animals that will inspire a painting. In her works she tries to capture a sense of the peace she feels while in their presence. The leisurely feel of a sunlit day is captured in her painting, “Cows at the Edge of the Marsh.” A grouping of five cows stands behind grasses lit by the warm glow of the sun while the water and distant trees in the background capture the hazy quality of the day. We feel a sense of tranquility as we take in the image. Her other paintings in the exhibition include paintings of sheep with newly born lambs.
Stan Moeller, of York, Maine, turns his attention to the streets and architecture of Florence, Italy, in “Piazza della Signoria.” He is an experienced plein air painter and has the ability to capture an impression of bustling figures amidst the architecture of this famous city. His work evokes memories of travels abroad. This talent in capturing figures is also apparent in “Tidal Pool Souvenirs,” a painting of a young woman precariously balanced on the rocks, intent on reaching down into a tidal pool to grasp a treasure she’s just discovered. Years spent painting on Monhegan Island have given Moeller an innate understanding of Maine’s rocky landscape and the ability to capture it with ease. Stan Moeller has taught numerous painting workshops on Monhegan Island, Tuscany, and in the South of France. He was honored with a one-person show at the Island Inn on Monhegan Island this summer.

 

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Afternoon Light, Monhegan by Robert Noreika, oil, 16” x 20”

Maine subject matter continues to inspire artists from all over the United States. Robert Noreika travels to Maine throughout the summer to paint en plein air, directly from life. “Afternoon Light, Monhegan Island” is a lively painting with energetic colorful brushwork. The foreground grasses, tree, and cottage have an easy gestural quality to them. In the middle distance, Manana Island is captured in violet and golden tones, white billowy clouds are to the right, and the turquoise sky above is reflected in the water. Just a few lobster boats provide additional interest. Noreika’s paintings have a spontaneous quality that is achieved by what he describes as his “gestural, fluid approach.” Of Noreika’s other paintings in the exhibit, of particular note is “Back Cove, New Harbor,” a beautiful painting in which he captures the essence of a small fishing cove by focusing on broad shapes and beautiful cool tones of violet, greens, and blues, for the sky, trees, and water, setting off the warmer tones of the buildings and accents of red dashes for the buoys; and “The Strike” which is a whimsical painting of a striped bass, its mouth open wide as it’s goes for a lure. “Working Harbor, Stonington, Maine” and “Incoming Squall” are his two largest paintings in the exhibit at 24 by 36 inches.

Hughes_Evening-Port-Clyde

Evening, Port Clyde by Neal Hughes, oil, 12” x 16”

Neal Hughes is another plein air artist who travels yearly to paint on the coast of Maine. His painting, “Evening, Port Clyde,” is a beautiful depiction of a fleeting moment when the last rays of the setting sun glance across the hull of a lobster boat. In the background, the dock, land, and buildings are also bathed in the sun’s rich warm light contrasting with the scene’s cooler blue, grey, and violet shadows. The painting glows with an almost inner illumination.

Hughes is a former illustrator who has been painting professionally for over 30 years. His work has been accepted into many national juried exhibitions, and he has won many awards including an Award of Excellence at the prestigious International Marine Art Exhibition at the Gallery at Mystic Seaport. He was the grand prize winner of the Utrecht 60th Anniversary Art Competition, winning the top prize out of more than 12,000 entries.

A selection of work by the gallery’s other contemporary artists will also be on display, including Peter Layne Arguimbau, who paints shoreline views from the vantage point of his catboat as he travels up the coast; Joann Ballinger, whose pastels focus on children playing at the beach and scenes of farm animals, including “Youngins,” a pastel of three baby chickens alert in a coop; luminous ocean moonscapes by Al Barker; a series of winterscapes by Angelo Franco, as well as a dynamic painting titled “Fisherman’s Folly” which captures the vibrant colors of autumn at Jordan Pond in Acadia; a collection of photographic images of Scottish Blackface Sheep by photo journalist and shepherdess Nina Fuller; three separate paintings of birds – a seagull, a puffin, and a bird of prey by Charles Kolnik who employs a technique using many layers of oil glazes to achieve his distinctive results; classically inspired jewel-sized still lives by Heather Gibson Lusk; intimate small oil paintings by Crista Pisano who captures the atmospheric foggy conditions in her paintings titled, “Pemaquid Mist” and Ocean Point Waves”; a series of 8 by 8 inch painterly landscapes of marsh, ocean, and woodland by Polly Seip; Laura Winslow’s elegant watercolors that are inspired by nature; and rich evocative oil paintings of children at the water’s edge by Shirley Cean Youngs.

For more information, call 882-8290 or go to www.sylvangallery.com. The gallery is open Monday through Saturday, 10:30 a.m to 6 p.m., and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 49 Water St., Wiscasset, on the corner of Main Street (Route 1) and Water Street, next to Red’s Eats.

Impressionist Artist Specialized in Coastal New England Paintings & Drawings

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Summerings with Mary Bradish Titcomb, 1892-1902: Drawings of Coastal New England and the White Mountains will be on view at James L. Kochan Fine Art & Antiques, 75 Main St., Wiscasset, from August 31st to September 27th. Although listed as a portrait painter, Titcomb is best known for her impressionistic paintings of rural and coastal New England and is considered the most important woman artist of the Boston Impressionists.

The Kochan Fine Arts exhibition, with an opening reception during the Wiscasset Art Walk on Thursday, August 31, 5-8pm, features finished and preliminary drawings in graphite, watercolor and/or ink on paper from the first decade of Titcomb’s professional career. The drawings on view were all executed while on summer holidays in New England, principally coastal Maine (including Ogunquit, Sebago Lake, Cape Elizabeth, Portland, and Monhegan), the White Mountains, the North Shore, and Plymouth, Massachusetts. Principally landscape and coastal views, the exhibition also includes some portraits and still lifes.

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Born in Windham, New Hampshire, Mary Bradish Titcomb (1858-1927) began her artistic career teaching drawing in the Brockton, MA public schools. In 1888, she relocated to Boston to commence studies at the Boston Museum School under Boston Impressionists Edmund C. Tarbell and Frank W. Benson and later Philip Hale. During her early professional career, summers were spent drawing and painting in coastal Maine or the White Mountains near her birthplace. In 1895, Titcomb traveled to Europe for the first time, studying with Jules Lefebvre in Paris, but returned to Boston, where she exhibited regularly with the Copley Society and in numerous national exhibitions. Titcomb continued to summer along the New England coast, from the North Shore to Cape Cod, although she is known to have gone on a sketching trip to Arizona and Mexico in 1901. As she became more successful, she left her Fenway studio and purchased a home in Marblehead, Massachusetts, where she died in 1927.

For more information about Mary Bradish Titcomb and the Summerings exhibition, please contact James L. Kochan Fine Art & Antiques, 304-279-7714 or jameskochan@comcast.net

Closing Reception for “Home is Where the Heart is”

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“I hope you can join us for the closing reception for my show at the Midcoast Conservancy during Wiscasset Art Walk this coming Thursday, August 31st from 5-8 PM.”

This is the second to the last show in the beautiful Hagget Building and Midcoast Conservancy will receive 20% of all sales

Carolyn Gabbe “Home is Where the Heart is” is a solo show at the Historic Hagget Building in Wiscasset, Aug 9 through Aug 31, with an Opening Reception Thurs Aug. 10 from 5 to 8 pm.

 

 

 

 

Wiscasset Bay Gallery Exhibition Opens Saturday, July 8th

George Grosz, “New York Skyline, 1936” watercolor, 18” x 14”

George Grosz, “New York Skyline, 1936” watercolor, 18” x 14”

“Art in the Twentieth Century” opens at the Wiscasset Bay Gallery in Wiscasset, Maine on July 8th and will continue through August 4th. The exhibition explores the pluralistic nature of the art world in the twentieth century, with developing styles ranging from cubism, expressionism, realism and abstraction.

Of particular note is a work by German-American artist George Grosz (1893-1959) executed in New York in 1936. Grosz was born in Berlin, Germany in 1893. He became an important member of the Dada movement and openly rejected the rising German nationalism during the nineteen teens. The Dadaists sought to escape the rationalism and logic that they believed lead to World War I. Bringing an experimental, playful and even irrational approach to art Grosz and the Dadaists sought a return to our child-like nature. After Grosz emigrated with his family to New York in 1933 because of his strong anti-Nazi sentiments, he became a teacher at the Art Students League. A few years later Grosz painted “New York Skyline” in his loose, ethereal style with calligraphic marks accenting the tugboat and Manhattan skyline.

Andrew Winter, “Morning After the Storm,” oil on canvas, 30” x 40”

Andrew Winter, “Morning After the Storm,” oil on canvas, 30” x 40”

Contrasting Grosz’s abstracted, spirited work is Andrew Winter’s (1893-1958) “Morning After the Storm.” Rooted in a clear, realistic style and drawing on a dramatic event, the artist depicts four sailors on a cliff viewing the remains of their ship off the coast of Monhegan Island. Other significant twentieth century paintings and sculpture include a large modernist oil, “Woolwich Ferry Slip,” by John Folinsbee (1892-1972) and a major bronze by William Zorach (1887-1966) of his daughter Dahlov Ipcar entitled “Innocence.” The show also features drawings, watercolors and oils by important international artists such as Paul Guiragossian (Lebanese, 1926-1993), Andre Derain (French, 1880-1954), Marc Sterling (Russian/French, 1895-1976), Victor Vasarely (Hungarian/French, 1906-1997) and Ossip Zadkine (French, 1890-1967).

“Art in the Twentieth Century” will be on display at the Wiscasset Bay Gallery, 67 Main Street, Wiscasset, Maine through August 4th. For further information, call (207) 882-7682 or visit the gallery’s website at www.wiscassetbaygallery.com. The Wiscasset Bay Gallery is open daily from 10:00 am until 6:00 pm and is located at 67 Main Street (Route 1) in historic Wiscasset village.