Archive for Rockland

Dowling Walsh Gallery presents four new exhibits in October

“Magic,” by Tollef Runquist.

Dowling Walsh Gallery will host four exhibitions in October. The opening reception for all shows will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. Oct. 1 behind the gallery. Masks are required at all times inside the gallery.

“Sunflowers,” by Joyce Tenneson.

Joyce Tenneson: “Radiant Beings”

Oct. 1 to 30

Haunting, ethereal, mystical — all of these words describe the photographic style of Joyce Tenneson. Her photos command a complex and intense emotional response from the viewer, which has made Tenneson one of the leading photographers of her generation.

Vicki Goldberg, critic and author, writes of Tenneson: “Tenneson possesses a unique vision which makes her photographs immediately recognizable.” Her work has appeared on covers for magazines such as Time, Life, Newsweek, Premiere, Esquire and The New York Times Magazine.

Tenneson is also the author of 17 books, including the best-seller “Wise Women.” “Radiant Beings: The Magical Essence of Flowers” is the third in a trilogy of books on the life cycle of flowers.            

“In Chinese philosophy, a garden is a space for understanding truths that lie beyond ordinary perception,” Joyce Tenneson explains. “When the COVID pandemic hit, I brought the garden inside, surrounding myself in my studio with a cacophony of flowers and vines, keeping them for long periods to interact with, and to observe their life cycles. The photographs in this series are records of the interactions I had with my flower subjects, the Radiant Beings, in my indoor garden. In this new series I decided to take risks. I experimented with longer exposures on my camera, giving more space to the unknown, and to serendipity. Like my human subjects before, I wanted to allow these radiant beings to connect with me magically. As these images emerged in the last 18 months, I was surprised and inspired by what I discovered.”

“Gökotta,” by Erik Weisenburger.

Erik Weisenburger: “Gökotta”

Oct. 1 to 30

Gökotta is a Swedish concept, without direct translation, referring to the act of rising at dawn to go outside and listen to birds singing. This poetic image corresponds in title to one of the paintings in the show but more broadly encompasses the allure and whimsy of this painter’s work.

Portland-based artist Erik Weisenburger paints luminous landscapes, rich with detail. His meticulous brushwork and ability to convey glowing light is reminiscent of early Northern European paintings. Weisenburger’s compositions repeat natural patterns — blades of grass, ladders of tree branches, clumps of moss — and have a satisfying balance. The density of detail makes his paintings feel precious and treasured, pulling the viewer in to study each piece of the panel. Weisenburger’s work is often narrative or allegorical, with symbolic overtones referential of outsider folk art.

He studied at the Parsons School of Design in Paris and received his BFA in sculpture from the Art Institute of Chicago in 1992 and his MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He spent many years working in Chicago before moving to Maine in 2005.

Tollef Runquist: “Inner Alchemy”

Sept. 3 to Oct. 30

Tollef Runquist’s exhibition, “Inner Alchemy,” presents new works from his continued exploration of fantastical landscapes, the terrain of the psyche and the actuality of everyday life. They are paintings of inquiry and affirmation, loose forms of self-prompt and examination of maker and viewer. They combine imaginary objects, human figures and the archetypal to create enigmatic worlds. Recurrent imagery of daily objects — fruit, hands, plants — ground the paintings and create a unique, symbolic language. 

Runquist received his BA in studio art from Dickinson College in 2002. Since then, he has continued his education through painting and other mediums. He lives and works in Searsport.

Work by Wood Gaver.

Wood Gaylor (1883-1957)

Aug. 21 to Oct. 31

Dowling Walsh Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of works by Wood Gaylor. This exhibition coincides with “Art’s Ball: Wood Gaylor & American Modernism, 1913-1936,” on view at the Ogunquit Museum of American Art through Oct. 31.

Gaylor was born in Stamford, Connecticut in 1883. During the 1920s, Gaylor spent summers at the Ogunquit Art Colony, where he met and worked alongside artists including Yasuo Kuniyoshi and Marguerite and William Zorach. 

Gaylor was experimental in his early etchings and carvings, and the influence of Gauguin, Matisse, Davies and Laurent is palpable. Well-trained and completely immersed in modernist artistic styles, however, Gaylor’s mature style is uniquely his own. Flat areas of blocked color, and crowded scenes recording events and moments he witnessed, are hallmarks of his work.

Works by Gaylor are in the public collections of many major art museums, including the Whitney Museum of Art (New York), the Smithsonian American Art Museum (Washington, D.C.), and the Portland Museum of Art (Maine).

Dowling Walsh Gallery is at 365 Main St. in Rockland. The gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and by appointment on Sundays and Mondays. Visit www.dowlingwalsh.com, or call 207-596-0084 for more information.

Celebrate CMCA’s fall exhibitions

“Emily in the River,” by Cig Harvey.

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA) in Rockland invites the public to celebrate its fall exhibitions with a reception for the artists from 4 to 6 p.m. Oct. 2.

On view throughout the galleries are solo exhibitions by Ryan Adams and Hiraki Sawa and the thematic group exhibitions “Spatial Relations” and “Into Action.” The event will include an informal gallery talk by all three “Spatial Relations” artists: Elizabeth Atterbury, Gordon Hall and Anna Hepler. The event is free and open to the public.

“This is Black Art,” by Ryan Adams.

NEW EXHIBITIONS AT CMCA

Ryan Adams | “Lessons” :: Oct. 1 to Jan. 9

The focal point of Adams’ solo exhibition is a 33-foot-long mural titled “Switch the Code.” The title refers to the practice of code-switching, where individuals purposefully change their speech, behavior and/or appearance to be seen outside of stereotypical assumptions and accepted within a majority culture. The mural is accompanied by a series of recent paintings.

“Absent,” by Hiraki Sawa.

“Into Action” :: Oct. 1 to Jan. 9

“Into Action” features photographic works set in nature that document actions as they naturally occurred, actions as they were performed for the camera,  interactions created in post-production, or propose actions to be taken by viewers. The exhibition features works by Jennifer Calivas, Mark Dorf, Ray Ewing, Cig Harvey, Julie Poitros Santos and Shoshanna White.

“Negative Space Box,” by Gordon Hall,

“Spatial Relations” :: Oct. 1 to Jan. 9

The exhibition brings together a broad range of sculptures by Elizabeth Atterbury, Gordon Hall and Anna Hepler that were created to rest directly on the floor or lean on or hang from the walls. All three artists create works with strong contours and a visibly direct use of materials, including wood, ceramic, metal, concrete, cardboard and paper. In addition, each employs color as an embellishment, ranging from paint and pigment to colored pencil and stain.

Hiraki Sawa | “Absent” :: Oct. 1 to Jan. 9

Hiraki Sawa’s most recent single channel video, “Absent” (2018), presents scenes from an intimate and imaginative world, populated by surreal creatures that travel between grand and intimate landscapes. Sawa’s landscapes rest majestically within his circular projection, while his creatures (i.e., a walking tea kettle, a dancing cup, a flying spoon) emerge from the periphery, building a sense of anticipation for their arrival as the video progresses.

CMCA is located at 21 Winter St., Rockland. Summer hours are in effect through Oct. 31: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, go to https://cmcanow.org.

New paintings by Alan Bray at Caldbeck Gallery

“Larch,” by Alan Bray.

New paintings by Alan Bray are on view at Caldbeck Gallery from Sept. 18 to Oct. 30. An opening reception will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. Oct. 1.

In the artist’s own words:

It is among the intricate structures of phenomena that I look for an innate order of things. It is the branching pattern of trees, the drifting of snow, the meanders of flowing water, the swaying of grass in the wind, or the conjoining of ripples on the surface of a pond that imparts to a place and a time it’s particularity. To become a vital part of that particularity is to achieve familiarity, an intimacy and affection that serves to reorder the experience of a place. When I slow down and give myself up to a place or a phenomena it is to try and forget what I think I know and enter into a fresh state where all incidental details are eliminated and what appears to be chaos is organized into pattern

Caldbeck Gallery is at 12 Elm St., Rockland. Current gallery hours are noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday. For more information, email caldbeck@midcoast.com, go to www.caldbeck.com, or call 207-594-5935.

Last chance to see current show at Archipelago

“Blue Day” by Michele O’Keefe, on exhibit in the show “Currents and Channels: Four Coastal Maine Artists”

It’s that time of year! The leaves have begun to turn, apples are ripe for picking, and Maine fall weather is upon us.

Archipelago staff is reflecting on the highlights of summer and looking ahead to a comfy and cozy fall season!

The array of work in Archipelago’s gallery — a perfect capsule of Maine summer scenes — is now in its final week. The show is on display through Oct. 2.

With the days and nights turning colder, staff has curated a collection of products that emphasize self-care and coziness to help us ease into autumn. These and other Maine-made products are available in the store and online, with curbside pickup and shipping options. Masks are required while shopping onsite.

Archipelago is at 386 Main St., Rockland. Store hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday. Call 207-596-0701 or go to www.thearchipelago.net for more information.

Support Maine artists and see the current exhibit at Archipelago

“Spring Winds,”by Kaitlyn Miller, is featured in the current gallery show, “Currents and Channels: Four Coastal Maine Artists” at Archipelago.

Archipelago in Rockland receives deliveries daily to ensure that they feature new artwork and craft pieces by Maine artists throughout the year. When summer turns to fall, and farmers markets and craft shows cease, Archipelago is a great source for local shopping, allowing customers to continue to support Maine artists throughout the year.

Archipelago has curated a collection of items specifically for autumn, which are available online, in person at the shop and for free curbside pickup.

Shop online at https://thearchipelago.net/collections/all or in person at 386 Main St., Rockland (masks required). Store hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday. Call 207-596-0701 or go to www.thearchipelago.net for more information.

CMCA’s ArtLab for All Ages to be held Sept. 4

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art invites youth and adults of all ages to take part in an ArtLab for All Ages workshop from 2 to 4 p.m. Sept. 4 in-person at CMCA. 

In celebration of the Beautiful Blackbird Children’s Book Festival event presented by Indigo Arts Alliance, join CMCA and Rockland Public Library for a creative adventure. Participants of all ages will be able to choose from a variety of activities inspired by Beautiful Blackbird Children’s Book Festival’s online series and engage with this year’s series of books. 

The free workshop will take place at CMCA’s courtyard (ArtLab indoors if raining). Artists of all ages and skill levels are invited to attend. All materials are provided.

CMCA is located at 21 Winter St., Rockland. For more information, go to https://cmcanow.org.

September exhibits at Dowling Walsh Gallery

“Rose Cup,” by Tollef Runquist.

During September, Dowling Walsh Gallery will host four exhibitions: “Brian White: Curio,” “Tollef Runquist: Inner Alchemy,” “Sarah McRae Morton: Ribbon Cutting” and “Wood Gaylor (1883-1957).”

An opening reception will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. Sept. 3 behind the gallery. Masks are required at all times inside the gallery.

“Beachcomber,” by Brian White.

“Brian White: Curio”

Sept. 3 to 25

Brian White was born in Friendship in 1960 and spent his childhood combing antique shops and flea markets with his father, an antiques dealer. Largely self-trained as an artist, his midcoast heritage and love of nature is intimately reflected in his work.

With a miniaturist’s eye for detail and innate Yankee thrift, he combines shells, glass, fabric, metal and found objects to create intriguing works that are often part sculpture, part clothing and part assemblage. White has had three solo exhibitions at Ten High Street Fine Art, in Camden. His work is represented in the collections of Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockland; Penobscot Marine Museum, Searsport; Portland Museum of Art, Portland; and Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts. White lives and works in Union, Maine.  

“Tollef Runquist: Inner Alchemy”

Sept. 3 to Oct. 30

Tollef Runquist’s exhibition presents new works from his continued exploration of the fantastical landscape, the terrain of the psychological and the actuality of everyday life. They are paintings of inquiry and affirmation, loose forms of self-prompt and examination of maker and viewer. They combine imaginary objects, human figures and the archetypal to create enigmatic worlds. Recurrent imagery of daily objects — fruit, hands, plants — ground the paintings and create a unique symbolic language.

Runquist received his BA in studio art from Dickinson College in 2002. Since then, he has been continuing his education through painting and other mediums. Runquist looks at a wide range of artists as inspiration, including Richard Diebenkorn, Monet, De Kooning, Gauguin, Bonnard, Rothko, Sargent, Gordon Grant, Gerhard Richter, Hopper, Homer, Klimt and Egon Schiele.

He lives and works in Searsport.

“Mast Year,” by Sarah McRae Morton.

“Sarah McRae Morton: Ribbon Cutting”

Aug. 6 to Sept. 25

Sarah McRae Morton grew up in rural Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, where she still keeps a hayloft studio above the horse stalls in her family’s barn.

McRae Morton attended the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the University of Pennsylvania. She has studied chemical composition of paintings in Rome, as well as studied with Odd Nerdrum in Norway. She received a Matisse Foundation fellowship for her work on the local history of West Virginia and attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture.

She lives and paints in Cologne, Germany, and Pennsylvania. 

Read about the Wood Gaylor exhibition here.

Dowling Walsh Gallery is at 365 Main St. in Rockland. The gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and by appointment on Sundays and Mondays. Visit www.dowlingwalsh.com, or call 207-596-0084 for more information.

Wood Gaylor on view at Dowling Walsh Gallery

“Boxer (Jack Johnson),” by Wood Gaylor.

Dowling Walsh Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of works by Wood Gaylor (1883-1957), which runs Aug. 21 to Oct. 31. This exhibition coincides with “Art’s Ball: Wood Gaylor & American Modernism, 1913-1936,” on view at the Ogunquit Museum of American Art through Oct. 31. 

Wood Gaylor was born in Stamford, Connecticut, in 1883. During the 1920s, Gaylor spent summers at The Ogunquit Art Colony, where he met and worked alongside artists including Yasuo Kuniyoshi and Marguerite and William Zorach. 

Gaylor was experimental in his early etchings and carvings, and the influence of Gauguin, Matisse, Davies and Laurent is palpable. Well-trained and completely immersed in modernist artistic styles, however, Gaylor’s mature style is uniquely his own. Flat areas of blocked color, and crowded scenes recording events and moments he witnessed, are hallmarks of his work.

Works by Gaylor are in the public collections of many major art museums, including the Whitney Museum of Art (New York), the Smithsonian American Art Museum (Washington, D.C.) and the Portland Museum of Art (Maine). He died in 1957.

Dowling Walsh Gallery is at 365 Main St. in Rockland. The gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and by appointment on Sundays and Mondays. Visit www.dowlingwalsh.com, or call 207-596-0084 for more information.

Caldbeck Gallery: paintings by Katherine Bradford, assemblages by Dan Dowd

 

Paintings by Katherine Bradford and assemblages by Dan Dowd will be exhibited at Caldbeck Gallery from Aug. 3 to 31.

Caldbeck Gallery is at 12 Elm St., Rockland. Gallery hours are noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday. For more information, email caldbeck@midcoast.com, go to www.caldbeck.com, or call 207-594-5935.

Upcycled jewelry inspired by the Maine coast at Archipelago

Gail Miller

For almost 30 years, Gail Miller has created upcycled, scrap metal jewelry, inspired by Maine’s coast and islands. From lobsters, lighthouses and seagulls to farm animals and a special line for Maine’s 200th anniversary, her pieces — in copper, brass and nickel — reflect an understated charm that’s both beautiful, affordable and perfect for everyday wear.

A selection of Gail Miller’s jewelry.

A one-woman show, Miller often spends seven days a week in her converted garage-turned-shop working the press to cut out the shapes for earrings, pins, barrettes and pendants. For Archipelago alone, she punches over 1,000 pieces for the more than 500 earrings the store sells each year.

Her jewelry has been featured in Archipelago since it opened in 2000, and she has been the best-selling artist for many years.

Archipelago is at 386 Main St., Rockland. Store hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday. Call 207-596-0701 or go to www.thearchipelago.net for more information.