Archive for virtual – Page 2

New issue of MMPA Antidote now available online featuring Barbara Peacock

Barbara Peacock’s “James,” from the American Bedroom portfolio.

 

In response to COVID-19 stay-at-home orders and local closings, the Maine Museum of Photographic Arts in Portland began creating the online series MMPA Antidote, which includes photographic artwork, audio interviews, and artist statements and reflections from Maine artists, aimed to serve as inspiration during times of isolation.

This issue features work by Barbara Peacock.

In 2017, MMPA exhibited the beginning of this portfolio, American Bedroom,” writes MMPA director Denise Froehlich. “Barbara Peacock received a Getty grant to travel the country and make pictures of people in their bedrooms. She’s been at this project ever since, and the work has become a very up to date portrait of contemporary America. We are proud to share new work from this on going endeavor.”

In her own words: “American Bedroom is a cultural and anthropological study of Americans in their private dwelling: their bedroom,” Peacock writes. “The nature of the project will be portraits of individuals, couples and families that reveal the depth of their character and spirit. My interest lies in the poetic resonance of ordinary subjects much in the convention of our forefather of the documentary tradition, Walker Evans. I follow his practice of photographing commonplace subjects, working class Americans, beneath notice and yet the very fabric of our nation. I am passionate but not sentimental about America. I am drawn, as Evans was, to the quiet, magisterial beauty of people half lost in memory, with too much time on their hands or in silent paradox. I argue and persuade that these subjects matter.”

Published bi-weekly, Antidote features contemporary photographers and interviews with industry experts.

Visit www.mainemuseumofphotographicarts.org to view the most recent issue.

Investigate the links, share the images, and send some of your own to contact.mmpa@gmail.com.

Artist Talk featuring Christine Lafuente and Carl Little

“Shoreline Rocks and Hedge,” by Christine Lafuente.

“Acadia Seas, Acadia Seeing,” a virtual artist talk by Christine Lafuente with Carl Little will be held at 7 p.m. Nov. 5, presented by Cynthia Winings Gallery.

Lafuente’s talk explores how a decade of painting seascapes on Mount Desert Island has inspired an evolution in her still life compositions.

In her paintings of harbors, rocky coasts and the islands of Acadia, light plays through varying atmospheres of fogs, mists and clear sunny days. Lafuente writes, “Looking into water changes how I see nature. It becomes abstracted and mysterious, as in the way form falls apart and coalesces again in a reflection on the water. As I begin to express this transformation in paint, I also seek to recreate this visual experience in my still-life compositions. Inside a glass water-filled vase is a microcosm of how the world reveals itself in paint.”

Lafuente grew up in Poughkeepsie, New York, and was influenced by the Hudson River School of Painting at a young age. Lafuente has received an Adolf and Esther Gottlieb Foundation Grant, been included in the Invitational Exhibition of Visual Arts at the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and most recently received a Medal for Achievement in Visual Arts from the Philadelphia Sketch Club.  Her work is part of many public and private collections. She has exhibited in New York, London, and extensively along the East Coast. Lafuente lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

Carl Little is the author of more than 25 art books. Little writes for Art New England, Working Waterfront, Hyperallergic, Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors and Ornament. He has helped produce several Maine Masters films, including the award-winning “Imber’s Left Hand.” Born and raised in New York City, he directed the Ethel Blum Gallery at College of the Atlantic before becoming director of communications and marketing at the Maine Community Foundation in 2001.

RSVP by emailing cynthiawinings@gmail.com to receive a Zoom link.

Caldbeck Gallery announces new virtual exhibit

“Ornamental Crabs,” by Nancy Glassman.

Calbeck Gallery presents “Life, Still,” a virtual exhibit featuring a new body of work by Nancy Glassman.

View the e-catalog at https://mcusercontent.com/c6bdac10295726afaab4a2246/files/97e1e3ef-e812-4fda-859d-22bfd0a91ff8/Glassman_2020_ecatalog.pdf.

Caldbeck Gallery is at 12 Elm St., Rockland. Gallery hours are noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and by appointment. For more information, email caldbeck@midcoast.com, go to www.caldbeck.com, or call 207-594-5935.

Maine Farmland Trust Gallery presents virtual exhibit ‘A Reflection on Water’

“The Answers in Her Heart,” Leslie Harris.

Maine Farmland Trust’s new virtual exhibit, “A Reflection on Water,” explores the relationships that exist between humans and the precious resource, water. This show runs from Oct. 13 through Jan. 8 and includes work from 17 artists that show the diverse connections to this elemental and shape-shifting substance. With evocative multi-media, this exhibit explores the relationships that exist between humans and this essential resource and considers current issues regarding water as a vital component of agriculture and every ecosystem.

A macro color photograph by Emily Candler Davis and mixed-media paintings by Kathryn Shagas capture swift-moving water to create abstract images.

Sharon Yates and Carol L. Douglas rendered scenic oil paintings of gathering fog, farm ponds and places the land meets the water, while Leslie Harris’ paintings feature dreamlike figurative work of women wading in water in the moonlight.

The mixed-media paintings of Peter Walls and a monoprint by Julie Crane juxtapose beautifully in the underwater worlds of fish, while Julie’s reduction woodcut print of an otter complements Sara Gagan’s mixed-media collage of a blue heron. Jude Valentine’s digital prints are a striking interpretation of the elemental forms of water. Shana Rowe Jackson’s detailed colored pencil drawings depict shimmering morning dew on apples, blueberries, and grass stems.

Andre Benoit Jr. fashioned water scenes of stream run-off and reflecting moon cycles with painted wooden assemblages. Wonderfully complex paper cut and mixed-media images created by Mj Viano Crowe seem to tell mythological stories of the ocean. Mango Johnstone’s Nature Mandala features exquisite shells and sea horses, and Tracey Cockrell’s unique electronic speakers, fashioned of kelp, produce field recorded sounds of the shoreline.

“Upstream to Downstream: In Our Bloodstreams” is a digital video produced by ecological artist Krisanne Baker that illustrates how what we do upstream effects what happens downstream.

In addition, the full-color photographs of Bridget Besaw and Lily Piel, who have worked on documentary projects with MFT over the years, are showcased on the gallery web page to illustrate some of the many ways water is essential in agriculture, from growing crops to watering livestock.

There will be a virtual opening reception from 5 to 6 p.m. Nov. 20, with talks by the artists, including Krisanne Baker, a multimedia ecological artist whose work focuses on water quality, and Carol L. Douglas, a mid-coast plein-air, landscape and figure painter and instructor who writes a top-ranked art blog.

To attend, RSVP at mainefarmlandtrust.org/artist-talks-a-reflection-on-water for the Zoom link.

CMCA’s ArtLab for All Ages to be held Nov. 7

ArtLab

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA) invites artists of all ages to take part in an ArtLab for All Ages workshop from 2 to 4 p.m. Nov. 7. Participants will join ArtLab educator Alexis Iammarino in creating up-cycled sculptures using disposable materials and discarded plastic, taking inspiration from the work of artist Nicolas Sevigney in the CMCA 2020 Biennial exhibition.

Following CDC guidelines, the workshop will be offered by reservation with 20 seats available. The workshop is free of charge, but reservations are required. To reserve, email Alexis Iammarino at aiammarino@cmcanow.org.

Weather permitting, the workshop will take place in the CMCA courtyard. In case of inclement weather, the workshop will be held indoors with face coverings required and social distancing observed. The workshop will also be streamed live on facebook.com/cmcanow for those who prefer to participate virtually.

CMCA is located at 21 Winter St., Rockland, Maine. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, go to https://cmcanow.org.

CMCA’s ArtLab for All Ages to be held Oct. 3

ArtLab

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA) invites artists of all ages to take part in an ArtLab for All Ages workshop from 2 to 4 p.m. Oct. 3.

Participants will join ArtLab Educator Alexis Iammarino in creating mini assemblage sculptures inspired by the CMCA 2020 biennial exhibition.

Following CDC guidelines, the workshop will be offered by reservation with 20 seats available. Stay for the entire workshop or just an hour. The workshop is free of charge, but reservations are required. To reserve a spot, email Alexis Iammarino at aiammarino@cmcanow.org.

Weather permitting, the workshop will take place in the CMCA courtyard. In the case of inclement weather, the workshop will be held indoors with face coverings required and social distancing observed. The workshop will also be streamed live on facebook.com/cmcanow, for those who prefer to participate virtually.

CMCA is located at 21 Winter St., Rockland, Maine. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, go to https://cmcanow.org/event/artlab-for-all-ages-october-2020.

New issue of MMPA Antidote now available online

Jessica Burko, “Connections, From the Found Gone series” (detail).

In response to COVID-19 stay-at-home orders and local closings, the Maine Museum of Photographic Arts in Portland began creating the online series MMPA Antidote, which includes photographic artwork, audio interviews, and artist statements and reflections from Maine artists, aimed to serve as inspiration during times of isolation.

Published bi-weekly, Antidote features contemporary photographers and interviews with industry experts.

Visit www.mainemuseumofphotographicarts.org to view the most recent issue.

Investigate the links, share the images, and send some of your own to contact.mmpa@gmail.com.

New issue of MMPA Antidote now available online

Sara Stites, “June and Tower.”

In response to COVID-19 stay-at-home orders and local closings, the Maine Museum of Photographic Arts in Portland began creating the online series MMPA Antidote, which includes photographic artwork, audio interviews, and artist statements and reflections from Maine artists, aimed to serve as inspiration during times of isolation.

A new issue of MMPA Antidote is available online at www.mainemuseumofphotographicarts.org.

Work by Sara Stites is featured in this issue.

“My work has always had an organic, visceral aspect which I consider to be part of my concern with life issues, like vulnerability, passion and the uncanny,” she writes. “Much of it explores a paradox; sensitivity to deeply guarded inner stories coexists with a satiric playfulness, exploring the pathetic and the comic. Using mostly functional objects from the studio, I have been building precarious, tentative ‘sculptures’ in front of drawings and paintings that contain figurative elements as well as marks and erasures. These sculptural objects mimic, in 3D, the hue and form articulated in the drawing. Manipulation of the light source and shadows further a process of refinement and integration, particularly when the result has been photographed as the final “artifact” of the process. Objects, like a careful drawing, become democratized when considered within my photos where other materials are placed alongside the drawing. I celebrate the studio through the use of detritus, whatever is at hand, waiting to be repurposed in the photograph. The imagery becomes a melding of abstraction and representation, always considering gravity, air and light.”

Investigate the links, share the images, and send some of your own to contact.mmpa@gmail.com.

Meet the artists of MFT’s Bicentennial show ‘200 Years of Farming’ at virtual artist talk

“Why Buy the Cow,” by James Southard.

To mark Maine’s Bicentennial year, this show focuses on some of the history, practices, triumphs, and challenges of farming in Maine over the last 200 years — from homesteading to dairy, potatoes, blueberries, the local food movement, and present-day changes and challenges.

This exhibit encompasses a wide range of media to depict just some of the rich history of farming in Maine. Maine Farmland Trust is proud to partner with the Penobscot Marine Museum to exhibit seven glass-plate photographic prints on loan from the Eastern Collection of oxen, draft horse teams, and scenes of the harvests of corn and potatoes. Also on display are six black and white photographs from PMM’s new collection by Kosti Ruohomaa, courtesy of Black Star Publishing Company, depicting crisp, clear images of hard working farmers in their daily lives.

Join a few of the artists featured in the show, along with Kevin Johnson, curator and collections manager from the Penobscot Marine Museum, and others to talk about some of the history of Maine farming and the inspiration of its people and landscape during a virtual artist talk from 5 to 6 p.m. Aug. 21.

Learn more about the artists and their work at https://www.mainefarmlandtrust.org/200-years-of-farming-a-bicentennial-celebration. View the full exhibit at https://artcld.com/show/maine-farmland-trust-gallery-200-years-of-farming-a-bicentennial-celebration.

RSVP for Virtual Artist Talks at https://donate-now.mainefarmlandtrust.org/event/200-years-of-farming-a-bicentennial-celebration-artist-talks/e292839.

Join visual arts resident James Southard, academic writing resident Sophie Kelmenson, and several guests for a chance to learn more about their work during a virtual open studio from 6 to 7 p.m. Aug. 25.

Join Margot Kelley, the literary arts resident for September, and several guests to learn more about her work during the September Virtual Open Studio from 6 to 7 p.m. Sept. 30.

Maine Farmland Trust is a statewide, member-powered nonprofit working to protect farmland, support farmers, and advance the future of farming.

Maine artists donate to Maine Medical in new online exhibition ‘Sheltered in Place’

“Isolation,” by Nora Tryon.

Maine artists donate to Maine Medical in new online exhibition

Although the Union of Visual Artists (UMVA) Gallery, inside the Portland Media Center at 516 Congress St. in Portland, is not open yet, UMVA artists produced the online exhibition “Sheltered in Place.” The show’s work reflects artists’ thoughts and feelings on both the coronavirus pandemic and the pandemic of racism. A portion of any art sale from this show will be donated to Maine Medical Center for COVID-19 protective measures.

“The images and words of UMVA artists in this online exhibition surface from the isolation and compression of life in the pandemic,” said John Ripton, UMVA-Portland co-chairperson. “The works express personal and universal struggles. There are abstract and figurative pieces and a variety of media from painting and mixed media to photography and digital work. We hope you will plumb the depth of these highly personal interpretations and that one or more of the pieces will touch your spirit. Last, we believe community and society is the source of great art and we dedicate this work to first-responders everywhere.”

View the show at https://umvaportlandgallery.blogspot.com/2020/07/sheltered-in-place-pandemic-art-show.html.